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Atlanta Mayor candidate Mary Norwood

You'd expect Atlanta's leading mayoral candidate, Mary Norwood, to employ Barack Obama's campaign themes of 'hope and change' to sway a largely democratic electorate. It appears to be working as polls show Norwood's lead is solid.

But the fact that Mary Norwood is white, running as an independent and still leading, has brought national attention to this race. Norwood's numbers reflect that a city once abandoned by affluent whites, has undergone a demographic shift. And the way this race is playing out has some members of Atlanta's black democratic party political establishment feeling marginalized.

In a race testing racial harmony in Georgia's largest city, some veteran black power brokers say their hold on power is being undercut by their past successes running the city.

"We haven't always gotten the credit for that, no," said former Atlanta Mayor Andrew Young, who oversaw the early days of the city's rebirth during the 1980s. "I brought in 1,100 companies from around the world - $70 billion in private investment - and generated more than a million new jobs. "But most people think that's automatic, that that would have happened anyway," he said with a laugh.

Black mayors have occupied City Hall since 1973, but this year, a white City Council member is leading in the polls, even though two black civic leaders urged black voters to unite against her. Source: White candidate scrambles vote, attitudes in Atlanta race - Washington Times

But how much of a factor is race in this Mayoral contest? No polls have pinned it down yet. But it would be naive to suppose that race is not a factor at all.

The Survey USA poll found Mrs. Norwood leading by a 6-to-1 margin among whites, Republicans and independents. Mr. (Kasim) Reed, who has been endorsed by Mr. (Andrew)Young, leads among blacks, who made up 59 percent of the electorate in Survey USA's turnout model.

And in a major break with past elections, a separate Insider Advantage poll on Oct. 16 reported that Mrs. Norwood was even leading among the city's black voters, with nearly one-third supporting her. Source: Washington Times

According to Atlanta political insiders, no one is sure about tomorrow's outcome.

http://www.bvblackspin.com/200...r-in-36-years-polls/
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So does the fact that she's White mean that she is not the best/better candidate or the best person for the job? Confused

I've read a couple of these stories ... but I have yet to read one that focuses on anything other than the fact that she's White and leading in the polls! Eek

I mean ... are they saying that there's more White people in Atlanta now and that they are the ones that are going to put her in office? Has there been a redistricting of some sort?? Has she been/done more (politically) than the other candidates?? Confused

Are those running against her less competent ... but Black?? More competent ... and Black?? I mean ... what's the deal here? Are they trying to say that the Black voters of Atlanta are not politically astute enough to vote for their best interests and instead should not/do not think beyond voting to support members of their own race? 19

There's got to be a reason, other than that the woman is White, for her to be the front-runner in this election.
One of the issues I heard on the news about Mary Norwood is that althought he is an Independent and she voted for Obama, John Kerry and Bill Clinton in the last 3 Presidential elections, that she is a moderate conservative (code for closet Republican).

Plus many are concerned thar since she lives in a very White affluent subdivision of Atlanta that she will play to the special interest, her ilk and not be concerned about problems of African Americans and urban inner city Atlanta.

She currently leads becuase she probably has the best campaign and she is said to have more money to spend that the other candidates.

Also, current Mayor Shirley Franklin has a dog in the hunt. Ga. State Senator Kasim Reed,

Lisa Borders, Norwood & Ga. State Sen. Reed.

who was Mayor Franklin's campaign manager in her two mayorial victories and she also voiced concern about Ms. Norwood and her lack of political work inside the inner city of Atlanta.

But then again, she just might be hated upon and I agree with you, maybe she is the best peroson for the job.

Election is hours away, We'll see. fro
------------------------------------------------

But I will add this, these state levels elections that are now being voted upon (and Tuesday will tell a lot) will give the Repubs the ammunition, motivation and advantages that they are seeking prior to the 2010 Federal Congressional and Senate races. Republican wins at the state/local levels only fatten them up for the big kill come next year at Congress & Senate.

Dems need not be asleep at the switch, sittin' back fat & happy just because Obama is in the White House and both houses are democratic controlled.

Local/state govt is where the rubber meets the road, real change happens and Dems (especially African Americans) need to get just as motivated & involved as they did during the Presidential Geneal elections and keep/put Dems in political control in their towns & cities. fro
Last edited {1}
I hope a person of unknown African ancestry wins Atlanta's vote for mayor.

I do not believe 26 years of an African American occupying the Office of the Mayor in Atlanta is any reason to vote against an African American candidate any more than voting against a European American was a reason in 1973 ('...the town was incorporated as Atlanta on December 29, 1847.').

The town had a European American as its 'chief executive from its inception...186 years.

Soooo....

Is the message here: 'Thirty-six years is enough?'

PEACE

Jim Cheser
quote:
Originally posted by Cholly:

But I will add this, these state levels elections that are now being voted upon (and Tuesday will tell a lot) will give the Repubs the ammunition, motivation and advantages that they are seeking prior to the 2010 Federal Congressional and Senate races. Republican wins at the state/local levels only fatten them up for the big kill come next year at Congress & Senate.

Dems need not be asleep at the switch, sittin' back fat & happy just because Obama is in the White House and both houses are democratic controlled.

Local/state govt is where the rubber meets the road, real change happens and Dems (especially African Americans) need to get just as motivated & involved as they did during the Presidential Geneal elections and keep/put Dems in political control in their towns & cities. fro


Yep! You got that right, Cholly! tfro

Something I'm finding VERY interesting about a lot of these state/local elections is the fact that the Repubs are (unashamedly) turning their backs on many of the *moderate* Republican candidates in these races and giving them little to no support against their opponents!

They don't want them because they are not 'good enough' Republicans! Eek The Party is looking to shore up the CONSERVATIVE branch of their ranks ... better known as those crazy-a$$ 'birthers' and 'tea partyers' and those psychos that converged on the town hall meetings!

At first glance, that would seem like a recipe for the sure death of the Republican Party considering that the country if full of enough *moderates* thinking people (Dems, Repubs, & Independents) to have put our President into office!

But ... on the other side of that coin ... after watching the what has happened since the election and the sheer number of crazies (Conservative Republicans) that have come out of the woodwork and shown their face to the world .... hmmmm ... 19 ... now I'm not so sure! ek

I said all during the election campaign that America was not ready to elect a Black president ... then they did ... and I thought, 'Okay, I guess I was wrong!" But, no ... I think I was right. A whole lot of 'Americans' were/are not ready yet! And this election cycle is proving that they are trying to get (re)locked and (re)loaded for a battle that they already lost.

And that's probably not a good thing. For any of us. Roll Eyes
quote:
Originally posted by James Wesley Chester:
I hope a person of unknown African ancestry wins Atlanta's vote for mayor.

I do not believe 26 years of an African American occupying the Office of the Mayor in Atlanta is any reason to vote against an African American candidate any more than voting against a European American was a reason in 1973 ('...the town was incorporated as Atlanta on December 29, 1847.').

The town had a European American as its 'chief executive from its inception...186 years.

Soooo....

Is the message here: 'Thirty-six years is enough?'

PEACE

Jim Cheser


But ... don't we want for Atlanta for it to be governed by somebody who's going to do what is good and best for the city and its residents .. regardless of who that person may be?? Confused

And that's not to say that this White woman is that person! Nor that one of the African American candidates is either! I mean, I don't really know from personal experience, which is why I was asking the questions!

But ... having visited the city a few times and experiencing that type of environment with successful Black businesses and colleges and history kind of conglomerated together in a "Chocolate City"-type fashion ... my wish is for the health and wealth of city to continue to prosper for the residents there.

Of course, I would love to see an effective African American mayor at the helm ... but, I'll take an effective whoever can do the job, if one isn't available.
I thought this story was kind of interesting 19



November 3, 2009

Rubio hopes Crist-Obama picture speaks volumes

Posted: November 3rd, 2009 12:37 PM ET
From CNN Ticker Producer Alexander Mooney




Rubio wants this image to resonate with conservative voters.


(CNN) - Pictures can speak a thousand words.

At least that's what former Florida House Speaker Marco Rubio hopes.

The conservative Republican battling Gov. Charlie Crist for the GOP Senate nomination in that state has unveiled a new Web site showing a single full-page image of Crist with President Obama at a rally for the president's stimulus package last February.

"Get the picture?" text under the image reads. "Donate now to stand up for conservative principles."

Crist was one of only a handful of Republican governors to extend some support to the president's $787 billion stimulus package - a move that rankled some conservatives in his home state and across the country.

Since the Senate primary race began last May, Rubio has become the favorite of conservative Republicans while national party leaders are openly supporting Crist. Recent polls suggest Crist holds a 15 point lead over Rubio, a margin that is down from more than 30 points last summer.

The picture of Crist and Obama could resonate with conservatives in a similar way an image of Connecticut Sen. Joe Lieberman embracing President Bush resonated with liberal Democrats in 2006. Lieberman lost his Democratic primary to a liberal challenger that year, though won the general election as an independent.
quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:
quote:
Originally posted by James Wesley Chester:
I hope a person of unknown African ancestry wins Atlanta's vote for mayor.

I do not believe 26 years of an African American occupying the Office of the Mayor in Atlanta is any reason to vote against an African American candidate any more than voting against a European American was a reason in 1973 ('...the town was incorporated as Atlanta on December 29, 1847.').

The town had a European American as its 'chief executive from its inception...186 years.

Soooo....

Is the message here: 'Thirty-six years is enough?'

PEACE

Jim Cheser


But ... don't we want for Atlanta for it to be governed by somebody who's going to do what is good and best for the city and its residents .. regardless of who that person may be?? Confused---EbonyRose

I'm in that 'regardless who' camp.

This argument is ALSO typical of the argument used to suppress our lifting ourselves.

Ex.: BUT, CEPHUS, SHOULDN'T YOU SIMPLY WANT THE MOST QUALIFIED PERSON??'

This rationale is NEVER applied to positions being denied to African Americas e.g. quarterbacks, and of course Presidents of the United States.


And that's not to say that this White woman is that person! Nor that one of the African American candidates is either! I mean, I don't really know from personal experience, which is why I was asking the questions!--EbonyRose

Yet...we all have personal experience with this.

We are taught to IGNORE what we know to be true.

We are taught to 'be fair' is applying 'the rules' to European Americans...particularly when an African American is competing for the same position.

We are taught to deny ourselves at the same time we are affirming the value of a competing European American.

AND WE DO IT WITH DEFIANCE!!!


But ... having visited the city a few times and experiencing that type of environment with successful Black businesses and colleges and history kind of conglomerated together in a "Chocolate City"-type fashion ... my wish is for the health and wealth of city to continue to prosper for the residents there.

Of course, I would love to see an effective African American mayor at the helm ... but, I'll take an effective whoever can do the job, if one isn't available.
---EbonyRose

I've hired hundreds of people.

When I was hiring on behalf of an employer, I was never instructed to hire the best.

I was required to hire one of those who scored 'in the top three'.

Those were the rules.

If there was an African American in that .top three'...that's who I would hire.

If there was a woman in the 'top three'...that who I would hire.

I never had the luxury of an African American woman being in the preferred group.

We apply pragmatism to ourselves until we are no longer able to compete.

I REFUSE TO DO IT!!!!!!


PEACE

Jim Chester
quote:
Originally posted by Huey:
Does anyone know who won the election?

------------------------------------------------
Atlanta Mayor Race Heads for Runoff Between Norwood and Reed.


Reed




Nov. 3 (Bloomberg) -- Atlanta Councilwoman Mary Norwood and state Senator Kasim Reed were headed for a Dec. 1 runoff after neither received more than half the votes cast for six candidates vying for mayor of Georgia’s largest city.

Norwood collected 46 percent of the votes with 69 percent of precincts reporting and Reed had 37 percent, according to the Associated Press’s election Web site. Lisa Borders, president of the city council, was third with 14 percent.

Both leaders said they want to restore Atlanta’s police and fire departments, where the previous mayor, Shirley Franklin, eliminated jobs to close a $140 million deficit projected for fiscal 2010. Norwood and Reed also said they want to avoid new taxes after Franklin boosted property rates to add $55 million in the $541 million budget for the year that began July 1.

Norwood, citing a 13 percent rise in burglaries last year and the closing of fire stations, said she would make job cuts in other departments to expand emergency services.

She proposes tighter accounting to make money available for public safety, citing a report by the Atlanta Journal Constitution that the city paid a $1.6 million fine for mishandling pension funds.

“How can we expect to have money to pay our public safety personnel reliably when we waste a million dollars here and a million dollars there?” Norwood said on her Web site.

Reed would use money from this year’s property tax increase and from about $20 million a year in fines and fees he says the city isn’t collecting to pay for more police. He said he wants to hire 750 officers at what city officials said would cost at least $64 million, the Journal Constitution reported.

Adding Police

Adding police “will cut down on the need for overtime and patrols that are simply stretched too thin right now,” Reed said on his Web site.

Atlanta’s general-obligation bond rating was cut two levels to A from AA- by Standard & Poor’s in March, as the city’s 2009 budget shortfall grew to as much as $80 million from a projected $50 million to $60 million.

“Although the Atlanta area had experienced economic growth over the previous four years, management was not able to reign in its expenditures and adjust revenues to achieve balanced operations,” said S&P, whose A rating is its sixth-highest.

Other candidates in the mayoral election were Jesse Spikes, a lawyer, who received 2.4 percent of the vote; Kyle Keyser, a community activist, with 0.8 percent, and Peter Brownelowe, a former policeman, who got 0.2 percent.


http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/...103&sid=a1XRFlmDs.QY
quote:
Originally posted by Cholly:
quote:
Originally posted by Huey:
Does anyone know who won the election?

------------------------------------------------
Atlanta Mayor Race Heads for Runoff Between Norwood and Reed.


Reed




Nov. 3 (Bloomberg) -- Atlanta Councilwoman Mary Norwood and state Senator Kasim Reed were headed for a Dec. 1 runoff after neither received more than half the votes cast for six candidates vying for mayor of Georgia’s largest city.

Norwood collected 46 percent of the votes with 69 percent of precincts reporting and Reed had 37 percent, according to the Associated Press’s election Web site. Lisa Borders, president of the city council, was third with 14 percent.

Both leaders said they want to restore Atlanta’s police and fire departments, where the previous mayor, Shirley Franklin, eliminated jobs to close a $140 million deficit projected for fiscal 2010. Norwood and Reed also said they want to avoid new taxes after Franklin boosted property rates to add $55 million in the $541 million budget for the year that began July 1.

Norwood, citing a 13 percent rise in burglaries last year and the closing of fire stations, said she would make job cuts in other departments to expand emergency services.

She proposes tighter accounting to make money available for public safety, citing a report by the Atlanta Journal Constitution that the city paid a $1.6 million fine for mishandling pension funds.

“How can we expect to have money to pay our public safety personnel reliably when we waste a million dollars here and a million dollars there?” Norwood said on her Web site.

Reed would use money from this year’s property tax increase and from about $20 million a year in fines and fees he says the city isn’t collecting to pay for more police. He said he wants to hire 750 officers at what city officials said would cost at least $64 million, the Journal Constitution reported.

Adding Police

Adding police “will cut down on the need for overtime and patrols that are simply stretched too thin right now,” Reed said on his Web site.

Atlanta’s general-obligation bond rating was cut two levels to A from AA- by Standard & Poor’s in March, as the city’s 2009 budget shortfall grew to as much as $80 million from a projected $50 million to $60 million.

“Although the Atlanta area had experienced economic growth over the previous four years, management was not able to reign in its expenditures and adjust revenues to achieve balanced operations,” said S&P, whose A rating is its sixth-highest.

Other candidates in the mayoral election were Jesse Spikes, a lawyer, who received 2.4 percent of the vote; Kyle Keyser, a community activist, with 0.8 percent, and Peter Brownelowe, a former policeman, who got 0.2 percent.


http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/...103&sid=a1XRFlmDs.QY


tfro thanks
quote:
Originally posted by Cholly:
quote:
Originally posted by Huey:
Does anyone know who won the election?

------------------------------------------------
Atlanta Mayor Race Heads for Runoff Between Norwood and Reed.


Reed




Nov. 3 (Bloomberg) -- Atlanta Councilwoman Mary Norwood and state Senator Kasim Reed were headed for a Dec. 1 runoff after neither received more than half the votes cast for six candidates vying for mayor of Georgia’s largest city.

Norwood collected 46 percent of the votes with 69 percent of precincts reporting and Reed had 37 percent, according to the Associated Press’s election Web site. Lisa Borders, president of the city council, was third with 14 percent.

Both leaders said they want to restore Atlanta’s police and fire departments, where the previous mayor, Shirley Franklin, eliminated jobs to close a $140 million deficit projected for fiscal 2010. Norwood and Reed also said they want to avoid new taxes after Franklin boosted property rates to add $55 million in the $541 million budget for the year that began July 1.

Norwood, citing a 13 percent rise in burglaries last year and the closing of fire stations, said she would make job cuts in other departments to expand emergency services.

She proposes tighter accounting to make money available for public safety, citing a report by the Atlanta Journal Constitution that the city paid a $1.6 million fine for mishandling pension funds.

“How can we expect to have money to pay our public safety personnel reliably when we waste a million dollars here and a million dollars there?” Norwood said on her Web site.

Reed would use money from this year’s property tax increase and from about $20 million a year in fines and fees he says the city isn’t collecting to pay for more police. He said he wants to hire 750 officers at what city officials said would cost at least $64 million, the Journal Constitution reported.

Adding Police

Adding police “will cut down on the need for overtime and patrols that are simply stretched too thin right now,” Reed said on his Web site.

Atlanta’s general-obligation bond rating was cut two levels to A from AA- by Standard & Poor’s in March, as the city’s 2009 budget shortfall grew to as much as $80 million from a projected $50 million to $60 million.

“Although the Atlanta area had experienced economic growth over the previous four years, management was not able to reign in its expenditures and adjust revenues to achieve balanced operations,” said S&P, whose A rating is its sixth-highest.

Other candidates in the mayoral election were Jesse Spikes, a lawyer, who received 2.4 percent of the vote; Kyle Keyser, a community activist, with 0.8 percent, and Peter Brownelowe, a former policeman, who got 0.2 percent.


http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/...103&sid=a1XRFlmDs.QY


That's a good article, Cholly! tfro

It would seem that both candidate's objectives ... and platforms are pretty much the same! I suppose she considers herself a Democrat - though I haven't been able to find anything to which she claims an affiliation with any Party!

I suppose, in a runoff ... you have to give the Brotha his 'Black points' which would put him over the edge! It will be very interesting to see how this eventually turns out.
More Blacks in Atlanta Voted in Run-Off Election

Date: Friday, December 04, 2009, 6:06 am
By: Denise Stewart, BlackAmericaWeb.com



Three days after an extremely close race for mayor of Atlanta, details from the election are starting to emerge.

More voters turned out at the polls for the Dec. 1 run-off election than in the general election in November. Less than 800 votes separate winner Kasim Reed and Mary Norwood. And Norwood has not conceded defeat.

In the unofficial count, 83,564 voters or 32.7 percent of those eligible voted on Tuesday. In November, only 78,792 or 30.2 percent of the city’s eligible voters went to the polls.

Norwood, a City Council member from Buckhead, led in the general election with 45.8 percent. Reed, a former state senator, trailed with 36.3 percent in November, but finished Tuesday with 50.4 percent, enough to claim the title of mayor-elect of Atlanta.

Andra Gillespie, an Emory University political science professor, said the increase in voters between the general election and the runoff is unusual.

“We’re not socialized into voting twice at this time of year,” Gillespie told BlackAmericaWeb.com.  The turnout of almost one-third of the city’s voters is not considered bad for a municipal runoff, she said.

“You’re not going to see the same numbers as you do in a presidential or congressional election,” she said.

Still, large numbers of voters in some pockets of the city stayed at home this election, according to a BlackAmericaWeb.com analysis of polling data.

Blacks comprise 98.1 percent of the voters at the Thomasville Recreation Center in southeast Atlanta, and only 15 percent of the eligible voters at that polling site went to the polls.

In southwest Atlanta at the Dunbar Neighborhood Center, blacks account for 67 percent of the voting population, but only 13.5 percent of those eligible voters went to the polls.

“The turnout is not unusual,” Spelman College sociology professor Bruce Wade told BlackAmericaWeb.com. “We’re in the midst of a bad economy. Some people have just given up on politicians."

In some areas, there was a surge in the number of voters that probably came as a response to the last minutes of campaigning, especially with some advertisements from Norwood viewed as negative, Wade said.

Voting overall followed some well-defined racial patterns, with Norwood running strongest in the North Atlanta communities and Reed carrying the central areas of the city and the southwest section.

“Reed crossed over in the eastern part of the city because the area is more diverse,” Gillespie said. “We call them our urban pioneers. They have more in common with Reed in education and profession.”

Norwood made inroads in the inner city with two years of steady campaigning, Gillespie said. “She won a lot of respect, showing that she was a white woman from Buckhead who did not shy away from southwest Atlanta."

Prior to the general election, polls showed Norwood would pull about 30 percent of the black vote, and that’s about what she did, Gillespie said.

The voting analysis is not complete from Tuesday’s election, but Gillespie said she doubts if Norwood received 30 percent this time.

The issue at hand now is the recount. Only 715 votes separate the two candidates unofficially with the provisional ballots included.

Because there were no large numbers of problems reported with the electronic voting machines, observers said it is unlikely that there will be enough changes with a recount to reverse the outcome of the election.

“If it were 10 years ago, there might be a chance,” Gillespie said. “But given the technology used in the elections, I don’t anticipate a change.”

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