quote:
Originally posted by negrospiritual:
Romulus is right about this:

White students have been attending HBCU's for years when they don't want to drive 50 miles to University of Whiteville or when the onLY program in the region is at the local HBCU. They will swallow their fear and attend classes with the Dark People. They also receive sports scholarships and become star football players in the SWAC, MEAC and others.

This is old news


Well, the deal is you have white people that know they can't cut it at a white university beat a path to an HBCU and score big whether its in academics or sports. It's amazing the number of white boys that are starting to pile up on black football teams. FAMU and Alabama A&M University both have (or had) white quarterbacks and Southern has a white place kicker. I've seen white kids on scholarships throughout the collegiate athletics from tennis to basketball to track.
Goldman Sachs to Donate $2 million to Morehouse College to Endow Chair In Civil and Human Rights
By Morehouse College
Jun 5, 2007, 11:09


The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. (NYSE: GS) and Morehouse College today announced that Goldman Sachs has donated $2 million to endow The Goldman Sachs Leadership Chair in Civil and Human Rights at the College. The first academic to hold the Chair will be the new director of the Morehouse College Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection, consisting of 10,000 pieces of the late Dr. King's writings and memorabilia. King is a 1948 alumnus of Morehouse College.

"This generous donation represents yet another significant milestone in our ongoing partnership with Goldman Sachs," said Dr. Walter E. Massey, President of Morehouse College. "Thanks to this gift, we will be able to fulfill one of the most important aspects of our stewardship of the Morehouse College Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection - making the papers available to scholars and others interested in studying the works of our most prominent alumnus."

"An important element of Dr. King's teachings is a call for each individual to feel a sense of responsibility for the community as a whole," said Lloyd C. Blankfein, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Goldman Sachs. "We try to apply this lesson of leadership and accountability not only at our firm, but in the communities in which we live and work. We have enjoyed a long association with Morehouse College and appreciate the opportunity to deepen our relationship with this important institution in such a meaningful way."

Goldman Sachs will work closely with the holder of this new Chair, as well as with the faculty and administration of Morehouse, to develop programs both on campus and at the Firm around the theme of leadership as exemplified by the life of Dr. King.

There is a connection between Goldman Sachs and Morehouse dating back nearly 100 years. John Hope, the first black president of Morehouse and Walter Sachs, the son of one of the founders of Goldman Sachs, played significant leadership roles in founding of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). In 1906, Hope joined W. E. B. Du Bois and others in the Niagara movement. He was the only college president to participate in the protest meeting, which culminated with the founding of the NAACP. He later served on the advisory board for the group. In 1909, Walter Sachs served as the first treasurer and chairman of the finance committee for the NAACP. He was an early figure in the civil rights movement and helped the organization establish special funds to promote an anti-lynching crusade and take legal action against discrimination.

Goldman Sachs has actively recruited at Morehouse for a number of years and today there are 39 Morehouse alumni on its professional staff.

About Morehouse College
Ranked three times as the number one college in the nation for educating African American students by Black Enterprise magazine, and recognized by The Wall Street Journal as one of the top feeder schools for the 15 most prominent graduate and professional schools in the country, Morehouse College is the nation's largest, private liberal arts college for men. Founded in 1867, the College enrolls approximately 3,000 students. The College offers 26 majors in three academic divisions: Humanities and Social Sciences, Science and Mathematics, and Business and Economics. Morehouse offers a number of programs and activities to enhance its challenging liberal arts curriculum through the Leadership Center at Morehouse College, Morehouse Research Institute, and Andrew Young Center for International Affairs. Morehouse is one of only two Historically Black Colleges or Universities (HBCU) to produce three Rhodes Scholars.

Prominent alumni include Martin Luther King Jr., Nobel Peace Prize laureate and civil rights leader; Dr. David Satcher, former U.S. Surgeon General and director of the National Center for Primary Care at the Morehouse School of Medicine; Shelton "Spike" Lee, filmmaker and president of 40 Acres & A Mule Productions; Samuel L. Jackson, Academy Award nominated actor; Maynard H. Jackson, founder of Jackson Securities and the first African-American mayor of Atlanta; and Nima A. Warfield, the first African American Rhodes Scholar from a HBCU.
Okay, so Sachs donated 2 million dollars to Morehouse. Great. Millions of dollars have also been rolling into Miles College and they've aquired enough land to build another whole campus in addition to the one they already have. Bill Cosby has donated as well as raised millions more dollars for various HBCU's, so what's your point? We're still talking about one of the fabulous four: Morehouse, Spelman, Howard, and Hampton. There's still 110 other HBCU's on the list. So I'm brain dead - tell me what I'm supposed to be missing here, which is supposed to be the point of your creating this thread. Are we supposed to be up in arms because some HBCU's have been actively recruiting white students (and recently actively recruiting hispanic students) when some predominately white institutions have already been actively recruiting black students to their campuses?
quote:
Originally posted by ZAKAR:
The same ole lame arguements about black colleges not being up to standard and incompetent is a bunch of bull the stats show other wise. Out of all the black students who go on to earn graduate and post graduate degrees, over 50% come from black colleges. These black colleges only enroll 17% of of black college students. Does those numbers show incompetence?? I dont think so, and secondly, if you look at a list of the 100 most influential African Americans in The US, 98 went to HBCU's. Of course we have problems with our black schools, the most prevelant problem is simply underfunding and lack of research grants. People always want belittle our great black institutions but I refuse to sit by and accept lies as facts. If for example the University of Virginia, gets 500 million dollars annually from the State even though is generates over a billion dollars on its on and often have more money than they can possibly deal with, vs, lets Say Virginia State University who gets 50 million which school will perform better? Finally the reason why most black schools are in the Ghetto, and many white institutions i might add is because during reconstruction these land grants were given by the government and they were usually concentrated in areas with high black populations.


Funding IS a big issue, but also, ALUMNI support. some colleges get big bucks, in the millions just from the alumni. Also technology.

But as for quality, I think HBCU's need a little positive PR. My school back in the day was widely known for its computer science and business departments. We had black, white, middle eastern, african, caribbean and all kinds of students except not many hispanics.

Incidentally, I went to a summer research program at a highly favored predom. white school and got TA DA! a 4.0 for work that really wasn't that difficult at all and certainly wasn't more complex than what I was doing at my own HBCU.

some of us are brainwashed to think that Mr. Charlie's ice is colder...
quote:
Originally posted by negrospiritual:
some of us are brainwashed to think that Mr. Charlie's ice is colder...
*DING DING DING!!!* We have a winner!!!
I think too may times throughtout life, some of us forget that our ancestors paved the way for us. The African American kids who are fortunate enough to attend white universities are able to do so because of the struggles of men and women who fought bled and some even died so they would have that choice.

The vast majority of them were on HBCU campuses learning everything they could so that they could arm themselves to beat Mr. Charlie at his own game. It is a fact that some not all of the HBCU's have corrupt administrative employees.

We must not overlook the fact that one of the reasons that some of the HBCU's are in low income neighborhoods today, is due to the fact that a large portion of us have moved to the suburbs. When we were segregated these schools were on the "black" side of town. At one point in time the vast majority of those communities were once thriving and full of positive activity.

As all of you know, we had all income levels of African Americans living together so it stands to reason that the more affluent of us insured that the neighborhood wasn't a victim of blight. As a matter of fact there are predominately white schools that are in low income and or black neighborhoods.

The University of Houston is in a lower income area. Yale is in a less than desirable neighborhood. USC is in Downtown L.A. which is not a very safe area to be. Drake is on the black side of town in Des Moines IA. Just to name a few.

Some of the HBCU's that are having funding issues are state schools. Somehow their funding always seems to get delayed or never shows up. That was a problem Southern had for quite some time. LSU always managed to get the monies needed for whatever. Southern had to fight like hell just to get books in the bookstore for the students. Same thing happens in Texas with Prairie View A&M.

As someone on this thread so aptly mentioned it's all political. We as a people must stand behind one another. Our HBCU's need us. We can't let them divide and conquer us once again.

One reason our kids don't know more about the HBCU's is because no one is informing them. The counselors at their high schools are doing a terrible job. Thank God for the Black College expo. They are getting the word out through an annual multi-city tour.
Last edited {1}
quote:
Originally posted by negrospiritual:
quote:
Originally posted by ZAKAR:
The same ole lame arguements about black colleges not being up to standard and incompetent is a bunch of bull the stats show other wise. Out of all the black students who go on to earn graduate and post graduate degrees, over 50% come from black colleges. These black colleges only enroll 17% of of black college students. Does those numbers show incompetence?? I dont think so, and secondly, if you look at a list of the 100 most influential African Americans in The US, 98 went to HBCU's. Of course we have problems with our black schools, the most prevelant problem is simply underfunding and lack of research grants. People always want belittle our great black institutions but I refuse to sit by and accept lies as facts. If for example the University of Virginia, gets 500 million dollars annually from the State even though is generates over a billion dollars on its on and often have more money than they can possibly deal with, vs, lets Say Virginia State University who gets 50 million which school will perform better? Finally the reason why most black schools are in the Ghetto, and many white institutions i might add is because during reconstruction these land grants were given by the government and they were usually concentrated in areas with high black populations.


Funding IS a big issue, but also, ALUMNI support. some colleges get big bucks, in the millions just from the alumni. Also technology.

But as for quality, I think HBCU's need a little positive PR. My school back in the day was widely known for its computer science and business departments. We had black, white, middle eastern, african, caribbean and all kinds of students except not many hispanics.

Incidentally, I went to a summer research program at a highly favored predom. white school and got TA DA! a 4.0 for work that really wasn't that difficult at all and certainly wasn't more complex than what I was doing at my own HBCU.

some of us are brainwashed to think that Mr. Charlie's ice is colder...


Yes, yes. You're right. All black students that go to predominately white colleges and universities are Uncle Tom sell-outs, house n!ggers, brainwashed wannabee whites. All black students that choose to do the right thing and attend HBCU's are honorable, law-abiding, TRUE BLACK people that know their roots!!

Whoever has a mentality like the one mentioned above you're a damned closed-minded, uninformed idiot.

No, none of the HBCU's engage in corrupt acts. They're all legitimate, honest, hard-working institutions that only want the best for their students and faculty. It's whitey that's holding us back. It's Mr. Charlie that won't let us have anything. All us HBCU's need is a few dollars and the sky's the limit.

Some of y'all so-called pro blacks truly scare me and at the same time make me sick to my stomach. You're so eager to spread any kind of information that's considered good news but if there's anything out there that's considered bad news you ignore it, deny it, dismiss it as being Mr. Charlie's fault.

If I hadn't had the experience of matriculating at two different predominately white institutions and two different HBCU's I'd probably be dumb and naive enough to follow right along with you and say it's whitey's fault. But that simply isn't the case.
It's really humorous how people use the terms "most" and "many" with out offering any true facts... fully expecting others to just take their word for it... just on the basis of their credentials...

People of that mindset usually have an over-inflated ego and very high self-image, regardless of what the true picture appears to be...

I happen to think that it is dangerous to make sweeping generalizations... especially when you offer no proof to back up your claims... but hey, that's just the way I think...

INTELLIGENT.BLACK.COMMUNITY
Yeah, you're right. Sweeping generalizations without facts doesn't present a strong case. This is why I created the thread a long time ago about lack of black pride.

Even with a professors testimony to the wrongdoings of students at Stillman the testimony was dismissed by one AudioGuy. So if there's any evidence that surfaces anything negative that's going on at an HBCU it's lies and exaggerations. But if anything good surfaces about HBCU's it's 100% unquestionable, undeniable fact. If anyone is brainwashed it's you. How many HBCU's have you matriculated through? How many predominately white colleges and universities have you matriculated through?
quote:
Originally posted by Romulus Burnett:
Yeah, you're right. Sweeping generalizations without facts doesn't present a strong case. This is why I created the thread a long time ago about lack of black pride.

Even with a professors testimony to the wrongdoings of students at Stillman the testimony was dismissed by one AudioGuy. So if there's any evidence that surfaces anything negative that's going on at an HBCU it's lies and exaggerations. But if anything good surfaces about HBCU's it's 100% unquestionable, undeniable fact. If anyone is brainwashed it's you. How many HBCU's have you matriculated through? How many predominately white colleges and universities have you matriculated through?
The fact that you assumed that it was "about you" proves my point...
These are all lies:

Grade-changing scandal rocks Southern University: former assistant registrar's illegal actions date back to 1995
Black Issues in Higher Education, April 22, 2004 by Scott Dyer
BATON ROUGE, LA.

A massive grade-changing scandal is rocking Southern University's campus, and may wind up in the revocation of some undergraduate and graduate degrees.

In all, 541 students and former students have been implicated in an illegal grade-changing scandal masterminded by a former assistant registrar.

Southern University Chancellor Edward Jackson said the former assistant registrar, who was fired last year, apparently charged students up to hundreds of dollars to illegally change each grade. The university is still trying to determine if the prime suspect had some help.

"We've heard talk about him having runners to solicit business," Jackson said.

Jackson declined to name the grade-changing assistant registrar, but sources close to the investigation have identified him as Cleo Carroll. Southern University records show that Carroll held that position for years until he was terminated in 2003.

"Everybody knows who he is--one of the local television stations even ran his picture on the news," Jackson said.

The Registrar's Office had internal controls to prevent such abuse, according to Jackson, but they weren't followed because other employees trusted the assistant registrar.

"You should never have anyone in position that powerful," Jackson said.

The former registrar in charge of overseeing Carroll has been reassigned, Jackson said, and a national search is under way to fill the position. In the meantime, Jackson said he has permanently assigned an auditor from his office to oversee the registrar's operations.

The scandal first came to light in March of 2003, when a student who had enrolled in a Southern graduate program presented credentials showing that she had earned a bachelor's degree from that department. The department had no record that the woman had ever received such a degree, and concerned faculty members alerted the university's auditors, Jackson said.

By tracing the code that Carroll used to change grades in the university computer system, the auditors discovered 541 students who benefited from unauthorized grade changes dating back to 1995, Jackson said.

In all, the university auditors have identified about 2,500 unauthorized transactions that Carroll made during that period, Jackson said. Many involved multiple changes to the same grade that were made last year in an apparent cover-up attempt, the chancellor said.

Southern University officials have already released a full report to the local district attorney, who has vowed to prosecute everyone involved in the scandal as vigorously as the evidence will allow.

East Baton Rouge Parish District Attorney Doug Moreau said it's important to clean up the scandal for the sake of the Southern graduates who hold legitimate degrees.

"There are going to be Southern graduates who are concerned if there are people who are not really graduates but have degrees," Moreau said. While Moreau is pursing criminal charges, Jackson said federal officials are already looking to see if any of the illegal grade changes were used to obtain financial aid.

"The feds will want to know if any of those grade changes affected any of the students' ability to receive financial aid--and if they did, those students have some more problems," Jackson said.

A federal investigator was on campus within 48 hours after news broke about the scandal. In addition, Jackson noted that the Louisiana Department of Education has requested a list of the 541 so that it can take action against any of the students that might currently hold a teaching certificate.

Before the university can revoke any of the illegally changed grades or improperly awarded degrees, it must follow a legal process aimed at giving the 541 students a chance to defend themselves.

Winston DeCuir Jr., an attorney representing the university, outlined the process that calls for an initial hearing before a panel of faculty and department heads, followed by a more formal hearing before a board of administrators.

If the grade change involved the improper awarding of a degree, then the board of supervisors will ultimately take action to revoke it at a public hearing--and the student's name will become public at that point, DeCuir said.

Faculty Senate President Sudhir Trivedi said his organization is eager to help with the review process, which will likely take much of the summer.

"This is not the end of the world for Southern University--we have a problem, but we are going to fix it," Trivedi said.
quote:
Originally posted by AudioGuy:
quote:
Originally posted by Romulus Burnett:
Yeah, you're right. Sweeping generalizations without facts doesn't present a strong case. This is why I created the thread a long time ago about lack of black pride.

Even with a professors testimony to the wrongdoings of students at Stillman the testimony was dismissed by one AudioGuy. So if there's any evidence that surfaces anything negative that's going on at an HBCU it's lies and exaggerations. But if anything good surfaces about HBCU's it's 100% unquestionable, undeniable fact. If anyone is brainwashed it's you. How many HBCU's have you matriculated through? How many predominately white colleges and universities have you matriculated through?
The fact that you assumed that it was "about you" proves my point...


False accusations. And you're....

off
Article published May 26, 2007

A&T audit finds financial abuse

By Lanita Withers
Staff Writer

GREENSBORO "” Misuse of funds. Forgery. Nepotism. Widespread overspending and poor oversight.

These were among the findings of internal auditors called in to investigate financial irregularities at N.C. A&T, according to a report obtained by the News & Record on Friday.

About $2 million has been misappropriated, overspent, illegally solicited or misused in recent years, auditors allege. Among the report's recommendations: an investigation into possible criminal conduct.

Velma Speight-Buford, the chairwoman of the A&T Board of Trustees, said some of the report's findings reflect on former Chancellor James Renick's "management and leadership style," but the board ultimately is responsible for the problems.

"I personally take responsibility for the board not doing its job," she said Friday. "The board was not asking questions."

Among the audit's key findings:

* Employees in the Division of Information Technology and Telecommunications (ITT) misappropriated $87,514 between May 2004 and February 2006 by diverting IBM rebates into an account at the A&T Foundation.

* The report alleges that Rodney Harrigan, the former vice chancellor for the division, misused rebate funds and approved spending on "highly questionable purchases," including a beach cottage rental, holiday celebrations, tickets to athletic events and theater memberships for him and his wife.

Harrigan was arrested in December and charged with obtaining property by false pretense and embezzlement of state property.

* The mother of Harrigan's executive assistant received a vendor contract after the vice chancellor "assisted the Bid Committee with evaluating the vendors." The committee originally ranked the woman third for the job, but after the vice chancellor's input, the assistant's mother was bumped to the top spot and selected.

The mother was later prepaid $18,000 for work that she hadn't performed, a claim supported by falsified documents, the report says.

* Employees in the ITT Division solicited and accepted money from vendors in violation of state law and university policy, the report alleges, with nine vendors giving $1,750 over an eight-month period.

* The former program manager of a naval research grant for the College of Engineering misused as much as $500,000, approving large stipends for tuition, travel and fees that benefited herself and family members.

The manager paid a $66,733 stipend to her husband for the 2005-06 academic year "” triple the highest stipend paid prior to his entry in the program.

She told auditors her husband's costs were higher, in part, because "he found the housing arranged by the Navy to be inadequate."

He instead stayed in a Courtyard by Marriott for $5,500 a month, "almost three times more than the amount of the next highest fellow's lodging," the report states.

The report alleges that the program manager, who was fired, also forged the signatures of the dean and assistant dean of the College of Engineering and used grant money for one or both of her daughters to attend conferences in Jamaica and California.

And, according to the report, the manager overspent the grant's budget for a symposium by $17,000, including buying 200 laptop bags, 192 embroidered golf shirts, 500 Aster pens, 150 duffel bags and other items. Some of the items were recovered from her home after she was terminated.

Computer equipment and other electronics bought with grant money, worth $11,583, remain missing.

The university has started a criminal investigation into the manager's actions.

* Throughout the university, numerous grant funds were overspent or not spent for their designated purpose. A large number of A&T's 500 grant funds had incorrect balances.

"During our review we observed the deterioration of sound operating process and the lack of sufficient management oversight and review necessary for strong institutional research compliance," the report says.

* A sample review of 12 state operating funds found $896,588 in excess expenditures in 49 accounts.

* Employees allegedly used procurement cards to charge a variety of prohibited items, including Phil Chang Golf Tournament clothing for $1,053.

* $240,000 in proceeds from a Pepsi contract were improperly deposited into the Chancellor's Discretionary Fund in 2003 and 2004.

* $55,142 in pay increases were given to five administrators near the end of Renick's tenure at the university. One employee received a $17,250 raise in violation of UNC system policy.

The News & Record obtained the report, dated May 18, from the UNC system after A&T officials refused to release it to the newspaper.

The university, in a response to the audit report, said it has already taken steps to correct some of the failings, including:

* Requiring all signatures be made in writing, not with a signature stamp.

* Providing comprehensive training for staff members who work with grants and contracts.

* Putting policies in place to ensure that no one person has control over all aspects of a financial transaction.

* Providing regular updates on polices regarding conflicts of interest, the use of procurement cards and the acceptance of gifts and favors.

The A&T Foundation also has developed new policy guidelines and documentation for the use of unrestricted funds.

And the Board of Trustees plans to "place a considerable amount of attention on governance, board ethics and fiduciary effectiveness" during its retreat in August.

The university's response to the report acknowledges that the breadth and magnitude of the findings "threatens its viability."

"Early on, we realized that we had a serious problem of ethical behavior...," the response states. "It is abundantly clear that the condition we are trying to rectify here developed over time and reflects failures at several specific levels."

Attempts to contact Renick and interim Chancellor Lloyd V. Hackley on Friday were unsuccessful.

Transparency and clean audits will be key to regaining any trust that has been lost among A&T's constituencies, said Jeff Davies, the chief of staff for UNC General Administration.

"Clearly there are some serious things noted in the audit that needed to be addressed," Davies said Friday.

"The important thing here in my mind is that people have come forward and identified the problems, and once they are identified they can be fixed."

Speight-Buford said she hopes the university can get back on track.

"There are some things in there that shouldn't have happened," she said. "Well, none of it should have happened."

Article source.
quote:
Originally posted by Romulus Burnett:
So I'm brain dead - tell me what I'm supposed to be missing here, which is supposed to be the point of your creating this thread. Are we supposed to be up in arms because some HBCU's have been actively recruiting white students (and recently actively recruiting hispanic students) when some predominately white institutions have already been actively recruiting black students to their campuses?


Dude ... you really need to get a grip!! Eek Who says you're "missing" something or that I had a specific point?

I posted what I thought was a story of interest. You're the one that jumped in with all the "I did this ... I am that ... I went here ... and that happened there" tirade!! I'm sorry ... but, am I really supposed to give a .. er .. care about who sent you where or what happened when you got there? If so, maybe that's what you're missing! Eek

If I have made any "point" during this discussion, it would be my displeasure at HBCUs being sued by White folks for discrimination and having them be forced into actively recruiting and giving away scholarships to entice enrollment to people who have never been excluded from enrolling in the first place. And if you want to be "up in arms" about that ... or not ... that's really your business!! I'm not asking you to care one way or the other. You could have just read the story and moved on!

I don't know why you think everything has to revolve around you (well, yeah, I do! Roll Eyes ), but I don't see where anybody has actually disagreed that many HBCUs have administrative problems, but, you can't seem to agree with anybody but yourself ... and seem to refuse to acknowledge that inadequate funding also plays a role in why so many HBCUs struggle!

The Univ. of Florida, Florida A&M, Morehouse & Morris Brown all pretty much share the same piece of land ... but only two are actually financially solvent? Why? Because 2 out of the 4 have a steady infusion of millions of dollars in donations! And, as I'm sure you know, the Univ. of FL is predominantly White!

Now ... you can take that and ... um .. believe it or not! Eek I don't think anybody really much cares. But, this is not about you nor whether or not you matriculated yourself out of a paper bag!! Eek You need to put your ego down ... and back away slowly .. and then, if you find you still have anything substantial to add to the conversation, share it!! If not, then perhaps you go find somewhere else to play. Grown folks are talking, here. Roll Eyes
Last edited {1}
Getting FAMU Back on firm footing: series of alleged financial mismanagement, negative press shake up longtime emblem of Black college success

The courtyard outside the state Capitol building was a sea of gold and maroon as chanting students from Florida State University passed out popcorn to passers-by. Inside the building, however, on the 22nd floor, a tasteful sounds of piano and flute playing songs from "Porgy and Bess" were a sharp counterpoint to the blaring band music below.

This was "FAMU at the State Capitol Day," a day for Florida A&M University administrators, faculty and students wearing green and orange business attire to mingle with and say their thank-yous to legislators, stall" and aides. And while the unwelcome appearance of Florida State Seminole boosters on the scene occasioned no little bitterness among the FAMU Rattlers, the intended audience for both displays didn't appear to have been fooled.

Matters were felt to be at so critical a pass in November that the state's chief financial officer, Tom Gallagher, took the almost unheard-of step of cutting off pay to the FAMU president and 18 top administrators until they turned over crucial financial records that were six weeks late.

The missing millions were later declared "found," and the allegations of mismanagement have mostly faded from public view. But only seven years after FAMU emerged as an emblem for Black college success with front-page coverage in Black Issues In Higher Education, and College of the Year honors from Time magazine and the Princeton Review, an impression of turmoil lingers, fed by:

* An attempt by the Student Government Association to impeach its president, Larry Rivers Ill, in fall 2003--despite the fact that he won the election by a margin of more that 400 votes. The battle became so contentious that Student Affairs Vice President Dr. Patricia Green-Powell had to intervene.

* The university's flip-flopping on a decision to abandon the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference and become an NCAA Division I-A school. A divided board of trustees voted 7-5 in February to delay the move and return to Division I-AA.

* A contentious review process, from which President Dr. Fred Gainous emerged in April with an "OK" rating from the board of trustees.

* A legal battle whose latest twist is that the former National Alumni Association president, Carolyn Collins got the results of the election that defeated her thrown out.

WHO'S TO BLAME?

Longtime FAMU observers, most of whom would not speak on the record for this story, are divided as to who bears ultimate responsibility for the contentious atmosphere that's enveloped the campus and its board since the fall of 2003.

Some lay blame squarely at the door of the new president, Dr. Fred Gainous, a FAMU graduate whose lifelong dream was to become president of the university. Twenty months, they say, is long enough to get the institution on a firm footing, and they grumble at Gainous' failure to live up to the high standard set by Dr. Frederick Humphries, who led the campus for 16 years before taking the helm at the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education (NAFEO)--a position from which, it must be noted, Humphries was recently asked to step down (see Black Issues, May 20).

Others express qualms about the board, a relatively new body, established in June 2001 and then reconstituted in January 2003. They complain that the board is "micromanaging" the university and Gainous, for example, by holding monthly meetings rather than the quarterly ones more common in higher education--or they express suspicions of the strong ties some board members have to Florida Gov. Jeb Bush.

Board Chairman James Corbin did not respond to repeated requests for an interview, while other board members contacted for this story either did not respond or said they preferred to let Corbin speak for the body.

"The bottom line is you have a new president and a new board, and both are trying to find their way," says Roosevelt Wilson, publisher and president of Tallahassee's Capitol Outlook and a "friend" of FAMU. He's been on the faculty and served as athletic director from 1980-85. "'Anyway you look at it, that's a recipe for chaos," he adds.

But if "chaos" it is, Dr. Castell Bryant, president of the Miami Dade College Medical Campus, a former FAMU trustee and current member of the board of governors that oversees Florida's 11 public campuses, is past the point of being able to listen to any more excuses.
quote:
Originally posted by Romulus Burnett:
Yeah, you're right. Sweeping generalizations without facts doesn't present a strong case. This is why I created the thread a long time ago about lack of black pride.
I am glad that you brought that thread up... As it is a perfect example of how sweeping generalizations are made...

quote:
Even with a professors testimony to the wrongdoings of students at Stillman the testimony was dismissed by one AudioGuy. So if there's any evidence that surfaces anything negative that's going on at an HBCU it's lies and exaggerations. But if anything good surfaces about HBCU's it's 100% unquestionable, undeniable fact.
No one has made that argument but you...

quote:
If anyone is brainwashed it's you.
Because I chose not to take the view of one college professor, who was only a professor for a period of two years, at a college whose total enrollment is 1000 students and then apply that to "many" or "most" HBCU's, hardly makes me someone who is brainwashed...

quote:
How many HBCU's have you matriculated through? How many predominately white colleges and universities have you matriculated through?
I have matriculated through one of each... The college of growing up around white people, which in of itself is a real education... and Howard University...

You, on the other hand, matriculated through four colleges/universities and not one of them taught you how to critically analyze anything, debate or spell...

You are an still an idiot... regardless of what you call yourself...
Last edited {1}
quote:
You are an still an idiot... regardless of what you call yourself...


Now, now. Let's not resort to calling names because you're wrong and I'm right - because you choose to live in a fantasy world of self indulgent blackness instead of seeing reality. I graduated from an HBCU just like you did but I'm not going to sit here and ignore all of the problems that's going on with HBCU's and blame it on "whitey" or "Mr. Charlie" or the poverty-stricken neighborhoods many HBCU's are nestled in when the source of many of the problems on these black campuses stems from the administration. All those other articles I posted about Southern University, N.C. A&T, and FAMU engaging in everything from grade changing, misuse of funds, Forgery, Nepotism, to widespread overspending and poor oversight are all lies too right?
Last edited {1}
Ouster Sought of Howard President
Faculty Panel Accuses Swygert Of 'Incompetence'

By Susan Kinzie and Keith L. Alexander
Washington Post Staff Writers
Saturday, March 10, 2007; Page B01

The head of the faculty senate called for the ouster of Howard University President H. Patrick Swygert, saying that the school is in a state of crisis and that it's time to end "an intolerable condition of incompetence and dysfunction at the highest level."

In a letter to the board of trustees this week that was obtained by The Washington Post, Theodore Bremner, chairman of the senate, complained on behalf of the leadership council that Swygert has jeopardized the financial health of Howard and left academic programs in disarray. The letter cited a recent National Science Foundation (NSF) audit that criticized Howard's management of grant money; the private university's largest source of revenue is the federal government.

The letter ended with a recommendation to begin the search for a new president immediately. The faculty senate, which represents more than 1,000 full-time professors, has often had a contentious relationship with the administration, with some complaints about insufficient funding. The letter carries symbolic weight but no authority; the board has ultimate say on the president's fate.

Swygert, who led the university's Charter Day ceremonies yesterday and has been president of one of the country's most prestigious historically black universities since 1995, said he has seen the letter. "I think it clearly demonstrates how democratic and how open the university is and how free the faculty is to express opinions."

He said he is not going to resign.

Addison Barry Rand, the chairman of the board, said that the members take all complaints seriously but that "we don't really know enough" about why the letter was sent. He said that Swygert suggested a dialogue with faculty leaders, and that one is being scheduled. "Then we will understand what is behind this," said Rand, who yesterday attended the ceremonies marking the university's founding 140 years ago.

At a reception tonight, the university will honor alumni, including D.C. Mayor Adrian M. Fenty, and celebrate a successful fundraising campaign. Earlier this week, school officials announced that they had met their $250 million goal nearly a year early.

In a March 6 meeting, the council of the faculty senate voted 16 to 2, with one abstention, to send a letter of concern to the board. Two professors noted that the council barely got a quorum to vote on the issue; there are about 50 members.

The letter lists concerns, including frustration with "a culture of administrative indifference and disregard" for the faculty senate's role -- a complaint at many universities. It states that the president failed to keep financial problems at the university hospital from spilling over into academic budgets. Academic programs are in disarray, the letter states, with substandard equipment and facilities. "The president has failed in many instances to implement funded programs when such funds have been awarded . . . has failed to provide effective administration of research grants . . . has failed to identify alternative financial sources given that the federal appropriation has remained flat."

Both Rand and Swygert pointed to the successful fundraising campaign to counter that last complaint; the fundraising goal was exceeded by $10 million.

Several other trustees declined to comment yesterday.

But some faculty members and others described the school as deeply troubled. "The place is in a state of chaos," Bremner said. "It's just managed crisis right now. So many things are not working."

He said, "Things are falling apart -- fairly rapidly."

In the past few years, there have been protests by students at the lack of leadership at the Divinity School, worries about the nursing and pharmacy programs, questions from accrediting agencies and intense debate over hospital plans. A proposal by the city and Howard to jointly build a $400 million medical center collapsed after two years of planning. Public scrutiny of the project, which Swygert pushed with university trustees, raised serious questions about the health of Howard's existing hospital and its university oversight.

An NSF audit found concerns with the way the university administered and tracked federal research grant money, including documenting the millions of dollars in projects with other universities and in subcontracts. "I think they showed clear evidence of not having the internal controls required," Tim Cross, the deputy inspector general for the NSF, said yesterday. "On the other hand, they showed the proper attention and took the steps to correct that."

It has been a tumultuous couple of years for Washington universities, as the presidents of two major schools stepped down under pressure.
Howard Still Struggling With Complaints About Services
By Toynett N. Hall
Black College Wire



Today's Howard University is quiet compared with the '60s. The protests and demonstrations of the late 1960s and early 1970s on the Howard University campus captured the social and political unrest of that time. Students held sit-ins, sent out petitions and organized protests to get their voices heard and demands met.

"Students Fired Up," an article in a 1975 edition of The Hilltop reported. Students took over the administration building in an attempt to upgrade the quality of student services, which they called "grossly inadequate."

Three decades have passed, and the problem of deficient customer and student services still distresses the Howard student body.

Dominique Askew, a sophomore biology major, maintains that "the student is not the priority. There is no one-to-one connection, and you are treated as if you are a number and a dollar amount."

Many students share Askew's sentiments, but others feel that if you accept less, you'll receive less. According to James Hogue, a sophomore marketing major, "People accept the way things are. They accept a lower standard instead of trying to make things better."

Jeffrey Stone, a junior physical therapy major, said, "Students do a whole lot of complaining and don't take much action."

The students of the '60s era were galvanized to cause change within their society. Some view the students of today as apathetic and lazy. According to Vincent Sherry, a sophomore print journalism major, "We're growing up in a more conservative time; the problems are different. I think the nature of the country back then caused people to be more proactive on campus about the issues dealing with the personnel."

Howard University's administration and personnel say they recognize that improvements within the system can provide competent customer and student services.

President Patrick Swygert created "the Strategic Framework for Action," adopted by the Board of Trustees, on Sept. 28, 1996. The plan is a major focal point of the Howard University Professional Development and Leadership Academy. The academy "was designed to assist our faculty, staff and administrations to acquire and refine professional and personal skills to increase competence and accountability," according to its Web page on the Howard University Intranet.

The administration has acknowledged problems within the system and says it has attempted to correct them.

Some students are still unsatisfied, but at least one views the hardship at Howard as an invaluable experience.

"Howard trains people for the inconsistency in life," said Afolabi Adeleke-Adedoyin, a first year graduate student in the School of Computer Science and Engineering.

Toynett N. Hall is a student at Howard University who writes for The Hilltop.

Posted Feb. 14, 2005
Only One Cheer for the Howard University School of Law
Karen Alexander
The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, No. 21 (Autumn, 1998), pp. 114-116
doi:10.2307/2999020
This article consists of 3 page(s).

Angered by below average bar passage rates and what they see as a badly deteriorating faculty, students at Howard University School of Law have issued their dean an ultimatum: Fix the problems or we take our complaints to Congress, which provided more than half the university's funding last year.

See entire article.
As much as I would love to debate about the virtues of Howard U., I am not going to... I will say this though... Howard University is a great university... that does not mean it is not without problems, but in reality, there are no colleges or universities that do not have them...

I will always speak of my univesity with pride, as do many others speak about theirs... I will also have love for all HBCU's, just because they are HBCU's... without which many great scholars, thinkers, athletes and people in general would not have had an opportunity...

ironhorse/corinthian/romulus (or whatever you come back as when you get banned again), HBCU pride is something that you apparently will never understand... Maybe it was the brainwashing you received from the white institutions you attended...

I will end my contributions to this thread with this:
Wink

Howard University: Mecca of Black education

Kevin Chappell

It is the richest Black educational institution in America, and one of the country's top research schools. Armed with a $312 million general endowment and a successful recruiting strategy that has attracted students who can hold their own with counterparts at prestigious White institutions, Howard University is experiencing one of the most successful periods in its 136-year history.

Having bounced back from a tight budget and low student and faculty morale, Howard has made strides in the last few years that, by many standards, have propelled it into ranks of the nation's elite schools. Top students from across the country and the world are now flocking to the university to major in one of the more than 120 areas of studies leading to undergraduate, graduate and professional degrees. The result has been unprecedented recognition for the Washington, D.C., university, which has produced two Rhodes Scholars, a Truman Scholar, six Fulbright Scholars, nine Pickering Fellows, one Miss USA, and a Nobel Peace Prize contender--and that's just in the last five years.

Long considered the Mecca of Black education, having produced leaders in virtually every area imaginable, Howard, on some lists, now ranks as one of the top 100 schools in the country, and the university's hospital as one of the 50 best nationwide. CEOs of Fortune 500 companies now line up to visit the campus, talk to students, teach classes and perhaps get first dibs on graduates.

One of 48 private universities (the only African-American university) supported mostly by funds from the U.S. Congress, the school now ranks as the 131st richest school (tops among Black institutions).

Howard has awarded more than 95,000 degrees. In fact, Howard produces more African-American Ph.D.s and MDs than any other university in the world. And with more than 3,000 faculty members, it has the largest concentration of African-American scholars in the world.

This year, Howard has 10,500 students enrolled in 12 schools and colleges, which include arts and sciences, business, communications, medicine, dentistry, divinity, pharmacy, nursing and allied health, social work, graduate school, education, engineering, architecture and computer sciences, and law.

For administrators, faculty, students and alumni, the national and international recognition being bestowed on their school only confirms what they have known all along: Howard produces graduates who not only have a high sense of cultural awareness and pride, but who are ready for cutting-edge careers in competitive areas of expertise.

Leading this push to higher ground is the university's president H. Patrick Swygert. For Swygert, who left his president post at the State University of New York (Albany) in 1995 to come to Howard, his mission is two-fold: Never forget Howard's steep history, but also never get so caught up in it that he doesn't adequately prepare the school for the ever-changing future. "I feel a tremendous sense of responsibility to those who come before me, and an even greater responsibility to those who come after me," he says. "One challenge is to continue to convince our community that if you attend Howard University or an HBCU, your child has a full opportunity to be successful, both in terms of human growth and potential, and professional growth and potential in this society."

Swygert points to such notable Howard alumni as Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison, Emmy Award-winning actress Phylicia Rashad, singer Jessye Norman, actress-producer Debbie Allen, Dr. LaSalle Leffall, Jr., Thurgood Marshall, L. Douglas Wilder, and former United Nations Ambassador Andrew Young.

Wayman Smith, chairman emeritus of the Board of Trustees, says he's very pleased with Howard's progress. "The school is on a track where it is competing with some of the top schools in the country," he says. "We are in a competitive environment. Howard has always been the pinnacle, the capstone of education in the African-American community. What has not been quite as self-evident is how well Howard University is competing against all other universities. When our students graduate, they can compete with anybody who graduated from any other school. We must continue that growth."

Award-winning actor, activist and Howard alumnus Ossie Davis says the school is an "outstanding university. It's a first-class university, one of the premiere educational institutions in the country," he says. "Howard is one of those bastions that define us, articulate our point of view, defend our interest."

In addition to educating its students, Howard has always had roots in civic-minded activism. That continues today with highly public stands taken recently by students on such issues as affirmative action and the crisis at historic Morris Brown College. "We are committed to the agenda of the African-American community nationally and worldwide," Swygert says. "For us, it's not simply about our doing well. But it's doing well with a purpose. It's a very old vision, but one that I want to build upon. It's not just about bricks and mortar. It's about purpose. I'd like to think that it's a live vision. It's not a static one."

The Howard vision began in November 1866, shortly after the end of the Civil War when a group of ministers and abolitionists, Black and White, persuaded Congress to address the needs and aspirations of the freedmen. The institution was named for General Oliver O. Howard, the commissioner of the Freedmen's Bureau. The first class of four students graduated in 1870. The first Black president was the legendary Mordecai Johnson, who was inaugurated in 1926.

It wasn't until 1928 that Congress authorized an annual federal appropriation to Howard for construction, development, improvement and maintenance. Today, 35 percent of Howard's annual budget comes from the Federal Government, which still leaves a great need for additional funds. In recent years, President Swygert has instituted several cost-cutting measures at the university and initiated a $250 million campaign. President Swygert says that although "Howard is a national university chartered by the U.S. Congress," federal support "does not meet all our needs as the only HCBU designated in the highest research category. We must call upon our alumni and friends for the additional resources needed to finance scholarships, fellowships and endowed chairs for our students and faculty."

University officials say African-Americans are increasingly responsive to their appeals. At the last Charter Day Celebration, 10 African-Americans gave $1 million apiece. Eight, including Chairman Frank Savage and President Swygert, were alumni.

The university received a tremendous boost recently when Johnson Publishing Company Publisher and Founder John H. Johnson donated $4 million to the university for the building of a new School of Communications. Founded 31 years ago, the School of Communications is one of the largest at Howard, and graduates the largest number of Black communications majors in the country. The new high-tech building, scheduled to break ground next year, will be named in honor of Johnson, a journalism pioneer who started his first magazine, Negro Digest, 61 years ago, and published the first issue of EBONY magazine 58 years ago.

"I have been a big admirer of Howard ever since I attended the first NAACP meeting in Baltimore when Thurgood Marshall was named assistant counsel," Johnson says. "I knew that he was a Howard graduate, and I have been so inspired by the marks that he and so many other alumni have made on this nation. I am honored to make a contribution that will help to continue the great journalism tradition to which I have dedicated my life."

Jannette Dates, the dean of the School of Communications, says Johnson's gift will permit the school to move forward at a much faster pace than expected. "We are so excited to be able to break ground," she says. "We've worked about four years on curriculum, and deciding what we wanted in the new building. We want students to be prepared," she continued, "to be competitive when they get out of here."

Another area of study Howard takes pride in is its School of Business. One of the first accredited business schools in Washington, D.C., it trains students to go out and make a place for themselves in the world of business. In addition to strenuous academic courses, the school hosts executives from more than 200 companies each year.

Many Fortune 500 companies, such as General Electric, J.C. Penney, Goldman Sachs and Chase Manhattan, have adopted the business school, agreeing to hire interns and recruit graduates. A dozen or so companies also give the business school $100,000 each year. Striving to be one of the best business schools in the country, the school only admits about 100 students each year. "We have the cream of the crop," says School of Business Dean Barton Harvey. "We want to be known for being tough and innovative."

Howard recruits more National Achievement Scholars than any school in the country. "Howard continues to fulfill its historic mission," Elijah Cummings, chair of the Congressional Black Caucus and Howard alumni, said while making the keynote speech at Howard's spring convocation. "I commend Howard University for the values of social justice and inclusion that are the center of [the school's] charter. These aspirations are the true vocation of America."

President Swygert says it will take a team effort to continue the progress. "It takes alumni: They have to feel good about their experience and tell others, and they have to be successful," he says. "It takes the faculty We have outstanding faculty who are competitive in their disciplines with other faculty located elsewhere. It takes students who are here today. They have to feel that they are fully engaged."

Cornell R. Williamson, president of the Howard University Student Association, says he will always treasure his time at Howard. "I love Howard University; specifically I love the students," says the graduating senior. "We are very passionate people. We're here to seek an education and utilize that education, not so much to fit in and have the luxury, items, but to utilize that to help those who come behind us. Just the aura you feel when you step on the campus is so much different than anywhere else you go. As an African-American student, you feel accepted, you feel welcomed, you feel at home. It's a family atmosphere."

Williamson says it's no accident that the university has consistently produced leaders in every field. "When you go to Howard University, you are automatically filled with that spirit that you can accomplish anything. It's because you see African-Americans in every capacity," he says. "It fills you with the motivation. Once you have that inspiration and knowledge that you can do it, there's nothing left but to achieve it."

University officials tout the school as a major research university where faculty and students seek answers to major problems affecting the Black community. The school recently established the National Human Genome Center, the only center of its kind at an African-American university. School administrators hope the center will produce cutting-edge research in the areas of DNA and genetics. The high-tech push by the university even extends to the School of Medicine, where future doctors are getting experience in procedures that promise to shape the future of health care. "We're modernizing the curriculum, the way we teach," says Dr. Floyd Malveaux, dean of the School of Medicine. "We see in the future physicians who will become more independent learners. We want to be on the forefront in technology."

Two of the university's newest buildings--the Louis Stokes Health Sciences Library and the School of Law Library--deliver on that research theme. Both are digital and conducive to labor-intensive study. Much of the university is connected to a wireless infrastructure, allowing students more mobility and flexibility in their learning. The school dormitories are now wired for the Internet and cable television.

"Howard has all of the attributes of a major research university in terms of facilities, equipment, faculty support, student support. This isn't a second-rate institution. You're not going to be impaired or sacrifice your career if you come to Howard," says Swygert, who, during his first years in office, directed the installation of computers in all dormitories and for all full-time faculty members. "If a student comes here, he or she will be with like-minded people, supportive people, and get a great education. At Howard, we recruit some of the best and brightest African-American students and faculty in the country. They are going to expect not to be disadvantaged in terms of resources and facilities. So we have to deliver."

COPYRIGHT 2003 Johnson Publishing Co.
COPYRIGHT 2003 Gale Group
HA HA HA HA HA HA!!!! Yes, yes, yes. I know about Howard University's rich history from its noteable alumni to Howard being the birthplace of all black greek fraternities and sororities (except Alpha Phi Alpha), all the way back to the university's founding father:


Oliver Otis Howard

It's a good thing ole' whitey, Mr. Charlie, povided a place for y'all poor and down trodden KNEEgrows to git some edumacashun. God sholl is good ain't he? Thank tha LAWD fo' Mista Charlie!!! You could have made a post that shouts accolades about Howard as long as the novel Moby Dick - that doesn't have a damn thing to do with how that school is experiencing unecessary hardships, which the student body is ultimately paying for. And you can talk about history and tradition all you want - unless you can sit there and prove to me the modern history facts I presented are lies you have no argument. Therefore, you cannot debate the issue even if you wanted to.
Last edited {1}
quote:
I know about Howard University's rich history from its noteable alumni to Howard being the birthplace of all black greek fraternities and sororities (except Alpha Phi Alpha) ...


Note to Romulus: If you wish to be taken seriously in this or any community that values intellectual integrity, one must avoid saying what they know, when what they say they know is incorrect.


[Just an observation for you to consider.]
quote:
Originally posted by Kweli4Real:
quote:
I know about Howard University's rich history from its noteable alumni to Howard being the birthplace of all black greek fraternities and sororities (except Alpha Phi Alpha) ...


Note to Romulus: If you wish to be taken seriously in this or any community that values intellectual integrity, one must avoid saying what they know, when what they say they know is incorrect.


[Just an observation for you to consider.]


Oh blessed assurance - please show me the error of my ways, grand master Kweli, sir. I must be wrong about the first chapters of Alpha Kappa Alpha, Zeta Phi Beta, Delta Sigma Theta, Omega Psi Phi, and Phi Beta Sigma originating on the campus of Howard University. Oops, damn, I almost forgot......Kappa Alpha Psi. That's why you're about to cry right? Because I left out Kappa Alpha Psi - the disgruntled founders that ran all the way to Indiana to start up their own black greek letter organization because they were rejected by Alpha Phi Alpha. Would I be correct? NO? Oh, I believe I made a mistake. The original name was Kappa Alpha Nu but they got tired of being called "Kappa Alpha N!$@ers" so they dropped the Nu and added Psi. Oh wait. I must have been wrong about Alpha Phi Alpha right? Your attention to detail is to be admired oh great Kweli. Yes, Alpha Phi Alpha was there on the campus of Howard but I think (and please don't quote me on this because I could be wrong) the first chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha originated at Cornell University. Oh, and I shouldn't be so rude - Sigma Gamma Rho and Iota Phi Theta (Altogether better known as the divine nine I think) weren't founded at Howard but they are still just as viable as the others.



....Now back to our regularly scheduled programming....
...Speaking of whites being recruited to HBCU's...



Black colleges recruit Hispanics
Updated 8/5/2006 9:43 AM ET
By Dorie Turner, Associated Press


ATLANTA "” Squeezed by stiff competition for their traditional students, historically black colleges are making a push to recruit Hispanics.
While the country's Hispanic population is booming, the number of blacks is growing at a much slower rate and other colleges are doing more to attract them. Black colleges that want to shore up enrollment numbers are revising recruitment strategies to include more members of the nation's largest and fastest-growing minority.

The campuses are hiring Hispanic recruiters, distributing brochures featuring Hispanic students, and establishing special scholarships for Hispanics. At the historically black Texas Southern University in Houston, the school has started five Hispanic student organizations, including fraternities and sororities, to help make the campus more inviting.

"I tell them 'There's a place for you and a need for Latinos to be present on (historically black) campuses," said Nelcon Santiago, a recruiter for the historically black Howard University in Washington, D.C. A native of Puerto Rico, Santiago talks to students about his experiences as a student at Howard, where he graduated in 2001.

Recruiters like Santiago and from other schools including the all-male Morehouse College in Atlanta are visiting predominantly Hispanic high schools and setting up booths at college fairs geared toward Hispanic students. Morehouse sends recruiters to high schools in south Florida, New York, east Texas and Los Angeles "” areas with large Hispanic populations.

"Considering Latinos and African-Americans share a lot of history together that they don't realize, I think it's a good idea," said John Miranda, of Silver Spring, Md., one of 15 Hispanics enrolled at the 2,800-student Morehouse.

Miranda, the 21-year-old son of Brazilian immigrants, said he picked Morehouse because he was offered a full-ride scholarship funded by an Atlanta foundation that promotes the education of Hispanics.

Morehouse's goal is for at least 5% of its student body to be made up of Hispanics within five years. If its current overall enrollment holds steady, the school will need 125 more Hispanic students by 2011 to reach that goal.

While the idea has been greeted with open arms by the college's administrators, some students and alumni said they are mixed about actively recruiting Hispanics to historically black colleges.

"I do have concerns," said Earl Nero, a retired Adlanta businessman who graduated from Morehouse in 1974. "Since the college has determined they want to stay the same size they are, that would take away space from qualified African-American students."

But having other minorities attending a historically black college will help them get "a real life view about what black people are all about," Nero added.

Student James Travis, who is black, said having other students of other races on a historically black campus bothers him "a little bit" because it challenges the college's mission.

"It's supposed to maintain the historically black tradition," said the 21-year-old student from the Atlanta suburb of College Park. "I'll have to see how it goes before I see if I want to change the situation or not."

Still, educators say the nation's two largest minority groups are a natural fit on a college campus.

"They are both underserved communities when it comes to higher education," said Michael Lomax, president and CEO of the United Nugro College Fund. "We have got to educate them so that we can have a competitive workforce in the 21st century."

The number of Hispanic students attending historically black colleges increased more than 60% from 1994 to 2004, while the number of black students grew by 35%, according to the U.S. Department of Education.

In the 1990s, Hispanics surpassed blacks as the nation's largest minority. The number of Hispanics in the United States grew by nearly 60% that decade, while the number of blacks only grew by about 15%.

At the same time, the competition for black students has increased as public colleges nationwide try to improve diversity by recruiting more minorities. Some state higher education systems, especially in the South, also have been forced by federal courts to meet specific black recruitment goals under desegregation lawsuits still lingering from the 1960s.

"All colleges want to have a presence of African-American male students on their campus. It makes the competition very tough," said Sterling Hudson, dean of admissions and records at Morehouse.

Five years ago, Texas Southern hired a Hispanic recruiter and began producing recruitment materials targeting Hispanics. Since then, Hispanic student enrollment has grown from 316 to almost 550. Right now, Hispanics make up about 5% of the 11,000-student body.

"We have the advantage as a HBCU to cater to the minority "” small classroom, small family-type environment," said Hasan Jamil, assistant vice president for enrollment services.

Howard has about 170 Hispanic out of 11,500 students after several years of focused recruiting. Interim admissions director Linda Sanders-Hawkins said with the country's growing Hispanic population, recruiting is not as tough as it once was.

Miranda, one of only 15 Hispanics at Morehouse, said it has not bothered him being on a majority black campus.

"Since I've been at Morehouse, I've gotten a different perspective on a lot of things," Miranda said, referring to black history. "I learned a lot that was left out of the schooling I got."

Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast,
Well, yes ... I was referring to Kappa Alpha Psi, Sigma Gamma Rho and Iota Phi Theta. But come to think of it you are also correct about Alpha Phi Alpha.

Oh, was I suppose to take your mocking corrections as evidence of your intellect/wit, or whatever? ... and not, as proof of the false and supportable generalizations that others have taken you to task for? Sorry ... I missed that.

And, oh yeah ... Are you saying that the Founders of Kappa Alpha Psi were Alpha rejects that left cornell, traveled to Indiana U., to start their own organization? Or, is this further evidence of your being full of shit?
quote:
Originally posted by Kweli4Real:
Well, yes ... I was referring to Kappa Alpha Psi, Sigma Gamma Rho and Iota Phi Theta. But come to think of it you are also correct about Alpha Phi Alpha.

Oh, was I suppose to take your mocking corrections as evidence of your intellect/wit, or whatever? ... and not, as proof of the false and supportable generalizations that others have taken you to task for? Sorry ... I missed that.

And, oh yeah ... Are you saying that the Founders of Kappa Alpha Psi were Alpha rejects that left cornell, traveled to Indiana U., to start their own organization? Or, is this further evidence of your being full of shit?


Lord have mercy. Just stop it dude. You're following me around every thread where you see me post. You're looking suspect.
quote:
Originally posted by Dell Gines:
I like foxes. I heard you were fox Smile.

I understand what you are saying though. I just wonder how talented the actual leaders of some of these organizations are.


Are you giving that same scrutiny to White policy-makers and White students coming to Black colleges? I don't see you questioning the competency of White students or White organizations that you want to donate money.
No, I read most of the posts in most of the forums ... your's seem to be the posts that most often present opinion as fact, and then when called on it [and unable to defend the BS statement], you get all defensive.

quote:
Just stop it dude. You're following me around every thread where you see me post. You're looking suspect.


If history is any guide, this will likely be the first shot in Ironhorse's fixation with projecting homosexuality on others. Roll Eyes
quote:
Are you giving that same scrutiny to White policy-makers and White students coming to Black colleges? I don't see you questioning the competency of White students or White organizations that you want to donate money.


Actually, speaking for myself, I give all institutions of higher learning equal scrutiny no matter whether they're black, white or otherwise, which is why I think it's counterproductive and hypocritical to consider HBCU's to be sacred and exclusive to blacks when many blacks have been running to white institutions for decades. It has also been true that many white institutions have recieved state pressure to increase their black enrollment, which is why I fail to see why HBCU's recruiting whites is such a big deal, particularly, when blacks aren't making a massive movement to keep their own institutions of higher learning in the - black.

Black students at HBCU's have been known to outperform their white counterparts at ivy league colleges. While the news is spectacular it doesn't mean one should be arrogant and full of pride gained from riding off of the backs of noteworthy people that matriculated from various HBCU's yet turn a blind eye to the blatant problems that threaten the integrity of HBCU's.

When a few HBCU's are caught in a scandal it's bad for all of the HBCU's. People would be hesitant to donate funds to HBCU's when they here about the administration at other HBCU's embezzling money and misappropriating funds like it's going out of style. Eliminating corruption should be the focus instead of being worried about how many white people are attending these black colleges and universities.
Last edited {1}
quote:
Originally posted by Romulus Burnett:
Actually, speaking for myself, I give all institutions of higher learning equal scrutiny no matter whether they're black, white or otherwise, which is why I think it's counterproductive and hypocritical to consider HBCU's to be sacred and exclusive to blacks when many blacks have been running to white institutions for decades.


And what about the couple of centuries when NO blacks could "run to white institutions"? Confused Could that perhaps be the reason why HBCUs were sacred and exclusive to Blacks? You sound like the White man who tried to justify his reasoning for suing his way into a Black school! In fact, that wasn't you, was it?? Confused

Counterproductive and hypocritical? Towards Black people ... yeah, that would be you!
quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:
quote:
Originally posted by Romulus Burnett:
Actually, speaking for myself, I give all institutions of higher learning equal scrutiny no matter whether they're black, white or otherwise, which is why I think it's counterproductive and hypocritical to consider HBCU's to be sacred and exclusive to blacks when many blacks have been running to white institutions for decades.


And what about the couple of centuries when NO blacks could "run to white institutions"? Confused Could that perhaps be the reason why HBCUs were sacred and exclusive to Blacks? You sound like the White man who tried to justify his reasoning for suing his way into a Black school! In fact, that wasn't you, was it?? Confused

Counterproductive and hypocritical? Towards Black people ... yeah, that would be you!


No. I sound like a black man that knows what the hell is going on. Many of the HBCU's some of you are so defensive and prideful about were founded by white people, so how sacred and exclusive can an HBCU be when its founders and supporters are white?

The Tradition of White Presidents at Black Colleges.
quote:
Originally posted by Romulus Burnett:
No. I sound like a black man that knows what the hell is going on. Many of the HBCU's some of you are so defensive and prideful about were founded by white people, so how sacred and exclusive can an HBCU be when its founders and supporters are white?


Do you even know what "exclusive" means?? Confused

"Exclusive" means, if you're Black you cannot attend an institution of higher learning with White students ... go get your education somewhere else!! Eek Who founded or built the school is besides the point ... who was able to/had to attend it?? Who couldn't go to any other school but an HBCU??? Do you know the answer Romulus? Or are you gonna run away to another thread like you usually do?

If you started from/at the beginning to the point where HBCUs were even necessary, why they were established in the first place, and who the primary beneficiaries of these schools were ... it would make sense as to why they are a source of pride for Black people!! At the time they were established, White people refused to believe that Black men & women were even capable of intelligent thought!

But you know what? This is not my week to enlighten morons! Eek I'll let that be somebody else's job! You think/do/feel and masturbate yourself ... er ... your ego ... all you want! You are simply not worth the time and effort anymore.
Last edited {1}
quote:
Originally posted by Romulus Burnett:

I think it's counterproductive and hypocritical to consider HBCU's to be sacred and exclusive to blacks when many blacks have been running to white institutions for decades. It has also been true that many white institutions have recieved state pressure to increase their black enrollment, which is why I fail to see why HBCU's recruiting whites is such a big deal, particularly, when blacks aren't making a massive movement to keep their own institutions of higher learning in the - black.


I disagree with this statement. HBCU's are sacred. And the purpose of HBCU's was not designed to educate all children of all people. But to specifically educate Black people who were deliberately barred from attending any institution of higher learning. What some people fail to comprehend is one of Black America's greatest setbacks has been the erosion of it's historical Black colleges following the civil rights movement. So today we have so-called intergration and people want scrap HBCU's. The architects of HBU's would turn over in their graves.

Mainstream colleges want to overhelm HBU's with non-Black students. This allows the state boards of regents to close down Black colleges or force Black colleges to merge with white colleges. Presently HBCU's are now instructed to justify their continued existence by converting their curriculum programs to be similiar to offerings of white colleges. Once HBU's change their mission and convert their programs into miniature white colleges, the power structure or state board of regents then argues HBU's ought to be closed or merge with white colleges because states didn't want the double expense of two colleges offering the same educational opportunities. This is why HBCU's are now forced to intergrate into mainstream white institutions. Not because Blacks have been "running to white insitiutions" as you claim.
BTW, I would like to give a shout out to my niece who recently graduated from Howard University as a member of the One Hundred and Thirty-Ninth Convocation. She is the fourth relative in my family to graduate from a stellar HBCU.

Go Dana!!!

beer
quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:
And what about the couple of centuries when NO blacks could "run to white institutions"? Confused Could that perhaps be the reason why HBCUs were sacred and exclusive to Blacks? ..............!


Ebony,

A colleague and I were recently discussing what appears to be a series of anti-FAMU articles in the Tallahassee Democrat. Every week or so, a writer attempts to spin happenings at FAMU as if the 12,000 student HBCU is failing. The school does indeed have its problems, but conspicuously, there are no full page expose's regarding Florida State University, a 40,000 student predominantly white university in the same town, situated less than 5 miles away from FAMU, in tallahassee. This despite FAMU being the largest or one of the largest contributors of degreed black people in the nation. Despite it's recent opening of a law school and attainment of ABA approval. Despite being named as one of the best deals in education by Time (or was it Newsweek). Despite the million dollar contributions of notable alumni like Willie Gary.

It's worth noting that the writers at the Tallahassee Democrat are all white and all profusely laudatory toward FSU. None of the student body issues, lack of student housing, security, parking, scholarship irregularities, or faculty issues have been hashed out in the paper.

In the 60's FAMU's law school and veterinary medicine programs were folded into FSU's who were supposed to have "slots" for black students in these programs. Guess who lost out? Only recently, through the florida legislature were additional law schools and medical schools funded again. Why? There is a dirth of minority lawyers and doctors in the state of Florida.

One needs to look carefully at articles which scrutinize HBCU's at every nook and cranny and fail to take Predominantly white schools to task.

Why no expose on the lack of security or mental health protocol on Virginia Tech campus?

Interesting that some of us are so gullible.
Indeed, Negrospiritual ...

FAMU was one of the schools I took my niece to tour when she was shopping for colleges to go to. FSU is somewhat of the "face" of that college complex with it being visible from the main roadway and looking quite regal when you approach it ... and then FAMU, tucked behind and almost walking distance behind this big grand campus shows all the signs of being old and somewhat neglected ... though the inside of the campus is rather beautiful! Maybe it was seeing all those young, talented Black youth on their way to be about the business of learning! Smile

At that time, they had no nursing program that my niece could enroll in, but said they were hoping to get one started in the near future. They did, however, have a business school that my niece's best friend was interested in ... and they had combined with FSU's school of business and FSU's students were coming to FAMU for their classes!! Eek Which did explain why I was seeing so many White children on the grounds!

Also, I have a friend that works as staff there, and he tells me the difference between what I read and what's really going on there! There have been forces at work there for a long time to get FAMU "brought down to size" because they keep getting stronger and better at turning out excellent highly successful graduates. Every year they have more and more corporations seeking out their students and donating money to their schools and colleges to turn out even more bigger and brighter young Black professionals out into the world.

So, I don't listen to the "puppets." They're doing the only thing they know how to do. Roll Eyes
As a HBC alum (Morehouse), I think it is fair to celebrate the unique learning & social atmosphere provided and acknowledge things that should be done better.

When you have impressive endowments and tuition between $20-30K/year, depending on whether you live on campus, you should reasonably expect:

  • Consistent hot water

  • A/C

  • In-room Internet Access

  • Extending learning via Internet

  • A quick, intuitive method to register for courses and housing

    Tradition is important, but excusing the delay in the basics of 21st century college education is unacceptable. My friends & associates from other HBCU's recount similar issues.

    Unfortunately, the impetus for making these improvements have more to do with attracting non-African American students.
  • Last edited {1}

    Add Reply

    Post
    ×
    ×
    ×
    ×
    Link copied to your clipboard.
    ×