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With the advent of the throwback craze and young folk sillily spending three to four hundred dollars on a damn shirt, I think this satirical article speaks volumes. Enjoy and respond.

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Just because I happen to live with my four brothers and sisters in my mom's two-bedroom South Side apartment, work at Taco Bell, and don't have a car, some ignorant types assume that I don't have much money. But, as you can clearly see from my $220 Fubu jacket and $95 Tommy Hilfiger sweatshirt, I could not possibly be poor.

The kind of name-brand clothing I wear is very expensive. See these Karl Kani jeans? Eighty-eight dollars. Would I spend that kind of money on a pair of jeans if I were poor? Of course not. If I were poor, I'd think $88 was way too much to spend on a pair of jeans that, with the exception of a tiny Karl Kani logo embroidered on the front right pocket, are practically indistinguishable from a plain old pair of $25 Levi's. But I don't think that's too much to spend because, for a well-off person like myself, money is no object.

Sure, I make $5.90 an hour at Taco Bell, but that couldn't possibly be my only source of income, could it? If my total weekly take-home pay were only $175, why in the world would I spend practically that much on a Nautica sweater and pair of Timberlands? That would mean I'd have spent 40 hours slinging Chalupas just for that one shopping trip to the mall. That'd just be plain stupid. So, obviously, I must be rolling in dough. And I am. You can tell by my special non-poor-people clothing.

Yes, it's obvious that I'm not like all those other losers who are working at Taco Bell and living with their moms. No, I'm a player. Take, for example, my socks. If I didn't have money to burn, I certainly wouldn't spend $22 for a pair of basic white athletic socks with a teeny-tiny Calvin Klein "CK" on them, would I? Of course not. I'd need to save my cash to get my telephone reconnected, or to pay off my loitering fine, or to help out my mom with the grocery bill. But, luckily, I'm not in that situation, and everyone knows it just by looking at my clothes.

I'll admit it: A lot of people here on the South Side are poor. In fact, most of my relatives are poor, including my mother and all my siblings. Knowing that, you might assume that I don't have that much money, either. But just look at these Lugz boots. And look at this Sean John baseball cap. They prove that I'm in an entirely different social class from my relatives, as well as from all those suckers who ride the bus with me every day.

Except for Angela, that is. I met her Monday on the C-route. She clearly belongs to a higher class of people like myself. I could tell because she was decked out from head to toe in expensive gear: Fubu jersey, Pepe jeans, and Fila shoes, not to mention a big gold chain around her neck. Angela was holding her two-year-old son, but he obviously isn't placing much of a financial strain on her, as he was wearing a complete matching Abercrombie & Fitch outfit, which must have cost around $140. Recognizing how much Angela and I had in common, I asked her out on the spot. We went to dinner at Denny's that very same night

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"We got to organize ourselves, We got to mobilize and there can't be no confusion in our collective solution, If not for ourselves, then for our kids, because we know who our enemy is!"

DPZ "for the hood"

More to come later!

Your Brother Faheem

[This message was edited by Faheem on January 05, 2004 at 11:42 AM.]
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There are Negroes who will never fight for freedom. There are Negroes who will seek profit for themselves from the struggle. There are even some Negroes who will cooperate with the oppressors. The hammer blows of discrimination, poverty, and segregation must warp and corrupt some. No one can pretend that because a people may be oppressed, every individual member is virtuous and worthy. Martin Luther King

More to come later! Your Brother Faheem
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Did anyone catch "Real Sports w/ Bryant Gumble" where he had the guy on who first started selling the throw-back jerseys? He is this middle age white guy who was on the verge of bankruptcy marketing his jerseys to middle-aged white men, until a young black guy gave him the idea to market it to the urban market. This guy became a multi-millionaire overnight from the black dollar.

This is one of those things that makes me go hmmm, what if these millions of dollars were focused on something more beneficial?
Obvious_1, I did see that and it was telling. This dude company went from making two million a year in 2000, to twenty five million a year in 2003 and expects to make close to forty million this year. It is insane to see a Black man on TV saying he spent fifty thousand dollars on jerseys and only have one hundred and fifty of them. A few months ago I went into our local mall with a close friend and we went to one of the urban stores called Mr.Lee's owned by a Chinese dude. When I looked at the price of one of the throw back jerseys and the tag said four hundred and fifty dollars, I asked my friend who I was with were they serious. I had no idea those shirts cost that much. I see young Marines walking around in those jerseys and one of their paychecks barely cover the cost of it.


Isistah a throwback is a sports jersey made like the jerseys worn by teams of old and players who no longer play their respective sports. Like this.



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"We got to organize ourselves, We got to mobilize and there can't be no confusion in our collective solution, If not for ourselves, then for our kids, because we know who our enemy is!"

DPZ "for the hood"

More to come later!

Your Brother Faheem
Its amazing that people will complain about hard economic times and then go out and spend the majority of their paycheck on something as silly as a throwback jersey.

I read somewhere once where young upwardly urban black professionals were getting over their head into debt trying to make a good impression. Buying the latest expensive cars and living in the highest priced locations. However you go in their nice place and open the fridge and its empty because they can't afford food Big Grin
Charlotte, N.C. - Ja Rule's "Clap Back" blares inside club H20, where Jolae Smith sips champagne near the dance floor.

Smith, 22, takes several sips before noticing her champagne bottle has an orange label. She looks confused. The bottle, given to her by a guy in the club, clearly is not her favorite champagne, which has a white or black label. She turns to her friend.

"This ain't even Moet," she says.

They place their unfinished glasses on a table next to the half-full bottle and walk away. The champagne, Veuve Clicquot, which costs about $100 a bottle in clubs, isn't exactly tap water.

The two women are part of the growing number of young African-Americans who drink champagne, which is a symbol of status among hip-hop celebrities. If Smith and her friend are any indication, though, these new champagne drinkers know brands, not grapes.

The biggest stars, from Jay-Z to the late Notorious B.I.G., rap about Cristal, Moet & Chandon and Dom Perignon. No one gives shout-outs to Veuve Clicquot - yet. But when they do, it will be the next hot drink among impressionable hip-hop fans who flock from one brand to the next - Courvoisier, Burberry, Mercedes - as they imitate their favorite rappers.

Bubbles are tops in hip-hop
Moet is a staple in clubs, but Cristal is the most popular, because only a limited number of bottles are released each year. Both have been mentioned in top hip-hop songs for more than a decade.

"Cristal became the hip-hop champagne of choice because it was perceived to be the most expensive," said Lucian James, who created American Brandstand, which tracks brand mentions in music.

Aspiring Atlanta rapper Arma G. exemplifies this attitude. At H20, he and his entourage pose for photographs and parade around with bottles of Moet. He actually drinks Hennessey and Hypnotiq, two other popular beverages touted by celebrities.

"This right here was three or four years ago," he says, holding up the Moet. "We're on to Cristal, Louis XIII. It's all about balla' status."

A baller is someone who has money to waste on luxury items. That spells profits for alcohol companies from hip-hop stars and the fans who mimic them. In the last year, sales of cognac have shot up thanks to endorsements by artists such as Busta Rhymes. Champagne and sparkling wine sales among African-Americans have been quietly increasing for nearly a decade.

Spike in sales
In 2002, more than 20% of African-American wine consumers drank champagne and sparkling wine, up from 16.2% in 1994, according to a survey by Adams Beverage Group, a trade publication based in Connecticut. In that same period, white wine consumers drinking sparkling wines steadily hovered at 18%.

Another survey by Scarborough Research confirmed that more blacks are drinking champagne and sparkling wine, and found they tend to be between ages 21 and 34. Scarborough also found that wine consumers who have been to an R&B or hip-hop concert in the past year are more than twice as likely to have bought champagne or sparkling wine in the past three months.

(Champagne is sparkling wine made in the Champagne region of France; sparkling wine made elsewhere isn't called champagne.)

The changing demographic of champagne drinkers from older white male baby boomers to young African-Americans has gone largely unnoticed by the wine industry. The reason for this is that the industry focuses its marketing on people who already drink wine. The younger, hipper champagne drinkers aren't necessarily regular wine consumers.

"They're not reaching out to emerging markets," said Alisa Joseph, vice president of advertiser marketing services for Scarborough, based in New York.

Moet as mating call
The industry also ignores women and Hispanics, said wine consultant John Stallcup of Napa, Calif.

They're missing potential customers. Champagne is the latest mating call for young men trying to impress women. In Charlotte-area hip-hop clubs, for example, Moet is as common on the dance floor as Heineken. Club Champagne and H20 sell at least two cases, 12 bottles per case, of Moet a week.

It's champagne night at H20. The first 92 women get a free small bottle of Verdi, a sparkling wine. Then comes the good stuff. Young men dressed in throwback jerseys are swigging Moet straight from the bottle. It usually costs $75 a pop. Tonight, it's on sale: $60 for one, $100 for two.

Jolae Smith finally finds some Moet. She talks with Chris Belk, who's celebrating his 25th birthday with a bottle in hand. Belk, like Smith, also prefers champagne when he's partying, even when it's not his birthday.

"I love Moet, Cristal, anything I want to drink. You've got to live life," he says. "A girl looks at you, you got a bottle in your hand, they think you're about something."
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HAHA... You mean if you have a bottle in your hand some woman will think you are about something? You gotta be kiddin me.

-------------------------
"We got to organize ourselves, We got to mobilize and there can't be no confusion in our collective solution, If not for ourselves, then for our kids, because we know who our enemy is!"

DPZ "for the hood"

More to come later!

Your Brother Faheem
The sad part is if you replaced it with some "night train", "MD 20/20", "Boones Farm" or other , the jacka$$es wouldn't even know the difference.

I usually eliminate any bs from the get go if I'm in a club. If they can answer 3 questions
1. What is the difference between brandy and cognac
2. What category do they fall in?
3. What does VSOP mean

If they can answer, I'll buy them a drink
if not its a six pack of schaffer light

catch
The funny thing is that I can remember back in the day (late 70's) that MD 20/20 was the drink that everybody was knocking back. That and Nighttrain, Boones Farm, Wild Irish Rose and awhole lot of other stuff that I wouldn't dare to drink today Big Grin

If these liquer companies had any brains they would distance themselves from the image of young urban wanna be's in sports jersey drinking their product right out of the bottle in the club like it was kool ale.
quote:
Originally posted by obvious_1:
Did anyone catch "Real Sports w/ Bryant Gumble" where he had the guy on who first started selling the throw-back jerseys? He is this middle age white guy who was on the verge of bankruptcy marketing his jerseys to middle-aged white men, until a young black guy gave him the idea to market it to the urban market. This guy became a multi-millionaire overnight from the black dollar.

This is one of those things that makes me go hmmm, what if these millions of dollars were focused on something more beneficial?



...such as supporting the lebron james fund?
[/QUOTE] If she can answer all three, maybe she's a drunk![/QUOTE]

Or very popular with the men folk..........

From my experiences you can usually tell the ones trying to live above their means and keep up with the Jonses. Around military bases we call that "applying for a green card" (military dependent ID)

The teens and adults that spend all their money on themselves doesn't bother me as much as when I see parents dressing their newborns up in the latest fashion knowing that it will be outgrown in a matter of days.
I knew one mother who spent big bucks as she claims her child would never be caught in any K-mart or Walmart brand childrens clothes. How in the hell can a child less than 2 really care about what they have on?
Totally stupid........


catch
This spending-way-too-much-for-something-just-because-it's-the-latest-thing-even-though-you-can't-pay-the-rent thing, is not just limited to the youth.

Many years ago, I worked as a manager in a club that catered primarily to an older set. I watched these older Black men roll up in caddies and lincolns; even though they couldn't pay their car note and rent (not mortgage) in the same month.

They'd have Fedoras on their heads, Cubana Glorias in their mouths, and pockets full of cash, even though their lights were one day from getting cut off.

They'd sit at the bar making faces as they sipped their double doubles of Remy. They'd order Remy, not because they liked it more than Courv. or Martel, or Henny, but because it was the most expensive cognac we sold.

And then they'd joke at me because I drove a 5 year old Honda, bought my clothes at Ross', and frequently told them I'd rather pay $600/month on a note, than $400 in rent.

I guess it's a matter of perspective.
We all do what we can to make ourselves feel good/better about ourselves. If you're Bill Gates, you give hundreds of millions of dollars away to causes that you care about. If you're Donald Trump, you build buildings/monuments to yourself. If you're Bob Johnson, you buy a professional sports franchise.

If you're doing OK - you buy a nice home, cars, clothes, vacations, etc. You keep up with the Jones! brosmile

On the other hand, if you're struggling - you probably have even more of a need to build your sense of self-esteem because the world beats up on you more than others. Brands are an easy way to do that. You may live in poverty - but if you sport the "right" brands when you're out - you _feel_ good about yourself.

BTW - self-esteem/feeling good about yourself - is a socially driven phenomenon. Therefore, we do things that will make us appear certain ways in front of others. Wearing the hottest brand feels good when you're alone. It feels great when you're around others though! That's what drives folks to consume in such great quantity - yet be burdened with consumer debt. Others don't see your personal balance sheet, but they do see what you wear/drive etc.

BTW - as a people - if we could make it "cooler" to have degrees and assets - then that would solve a lot of our problems! brosmile


There is no passion to be found playing small, in settling for a life
that is less than the one you are capable of living. - Mandela
ya know...I've been around for a minute or two...and I specifically remember when we (men and women) used to get ragged up to go to the club. Well...now we dress in the latest sports fashions, jeans, sneakers, and ball caps? Wassup with the ball caps? Where are the nice Brims? Women that put class in a dress once were considered fine...now they're considered stuck up? Women are beautiful one in all and being a bit older myself, I wish I could see them in the fall fashions puttin' it down with a cashmere skirt (at least knee length) and matching ensemble. When a woman is puttin twists in in fall fashions...tight jeans and micro-skirts will fall away

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