As Hobby Lobby decision reverberates, confidence in Supreme Court drops to record low

Washington : DC : USA | Jun 30, 2014 at 10:03 AM PDT
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A demonstrator in support of abortion and contraceptive rights chants in support of their cause after the Hobby Lobby ruling outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington
A demonstrator in support of abortion and contraceptive rights chants in support of their cause after the Hobby Lobby ruling outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington
 
Social Issues Breaking News: It's Complicated: Lots to Sort Out on Gay Marriage

On the same day the US Supreme Court issued a 5-4 ruling effectively expanding the concept of corporate personhood by allowing Hobby Lobby, Conestoga Wood and other closely held corporations to opt out of the Affordable Care Act’s contraception coverage mandate, a Gallup poll found Americans have less confidence in the high court than at any other time since the polling organization first began taking surveys on the topic. Gallup first measured confidence in the Supreme Court in 1973.

The Gallup poll was conducted June 5-8, well in advance of the announcement of the court’s ruling on the ACA’s contraception coverage mandate, but it stays in line with a trend of Americans having less confidence in all branches of governments: executive, legislative and judicial. Only 30 percent of Americans now have confidence in the Supreme Court, Gallup found, down from 37 percent in 2012 and an all-time high 56 percent in the mid-1980s.

The high court’s ruling came in response to Hobby Lobby and Conestoga using the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993 to challenge the requirement to provide certain contraception coverage under the ACA.

In writing for the conservative majority, Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr., said the 1993 law applied to for-profit corporations controlled by religious families, the New York Times reported. Alito wrote that the requirement for these companies to provide contraception coverage imposed a substantial burden on the companies’ religious liberty and said the government could provide the coverage in other ways.

Alito was joined by justices Antonin ScaliaClarence ThomasAnthony Kennedy and Chief Justice John Roberts.

In her dissent, Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote: “The court’s expansive notion of corporate personhood invites for-profit entities to seek religion-based exemptions from regulations they deem offensive to their faiths.”

Ginsburg was joined in her dissent by justices Elena Kagan, Sonia Sotomayor andStephen Breyer.

The decision applies only to closely held corporations, defined as a privately held company that has a limited number of shareholders with stock that is only traded on occasion. But both Ginsburg and Sotomayor said that the ruling “is bound to have untoward effects” in other areas.

Gallup noted that from 1973 to 2006, when President George W. Bush nominated Alito, “the Supreme Court maintained confidence ratings in the 40s and 50s in all but one poll.” But by 2007, a year after Alito was confirmed, the Supreme Court's confidence rating dropped sharply to 34 percent and has not reached 40 percent since that time.

Congress also hit a record confidence rating in the Gallup poll, dropping to just 7 percent, down from 13 percent in 2012. Confidence in the presidency fell to 29 percent, its lowest rating of Barack Obama’s presidency and the lowest since it stood at 26 percent in 2008 under Bush. The all-time low confidence rating in the presidency was 25 percent in 2007.

Punditty is based in Santa Cruz, California, United States of America, and is an Anchor on Allvoices.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"I'm just trying to make a way out of no way, for my people" -Modejeska Monteith Simpkins

 

AFRICAN AMERICA IS AT WAR

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON AFRICAN AMERICA

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON AFRICAN AMERICANS

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON BLACK PEOPLE IN AMERICA

AMERICA'S RACISTS HAVE INFILTRATED AMERICAN POLICE FORCES TO WAGE A RACE WAR AGAINST BLACK PEOPLE IN AMERICA

THE BLACK RACE IS AT WAR

FIRST WORLD WAR:  THE APPROXIMATELY 6,000 YEAR WORLD WAR ON AFRICA AND THE BLACK RACE

Original Post
Originally Posted by sunnubian:

As Hobby Lobby decision reverberates, confidence in Supreme Court drops to record low

Washington : DC : USA | Jun 30, 2014 at 10:03 AM PDT
BY  send a private message
 
 
 
50
VIEWS: 6,228
 
 
1 of 5
Next
A demonstrator in support of abortion and contraceptive rights chants in support of their cause after the Hobby Lobby ruling outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington
A demonstrator in support of abortion and contraceptive rights chants in support of their cause after the Hobby Lobby ruling outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington
 
Social Issues Breaking News: It's Complicated: Lots to Sort Out on Gay Marriage

On the same day the US Supreme Court issued a 5-4 ruling effectively expanding the concept of corporate personhood by allowing Hobby Lobby, Conestoga Wood and other closely held corporations to opt out of the Affordable Care Act’s contraception coverage mandate, a Gallup poll found Americans have less confidence in the high court than at any other time since the polling organization first began taking surveys on the topic. Gallup first measured confidence in the Supreme Court in 1973.

The Gallup poll was conducted June 5-8, well in advance of the announcement of the court’s ruling on the ACA’s contraception coverage mandate, but it stays in line with a trend of Americans having less confidence in all branches of governments: executive, legislative and judicial. Only 30 percent of Americans now have confidence in the Supreme Court, Gallup found, down from 37 percent in 2012 and an all-time high 56 percent in the mid-1980s.

The high court’s ruling came in response to Hobby Lobby and Conestoga using the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993 to challenge the requirement to provide certain contraception coverage under the ACA.

In writing for the conservative majority, Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr., said the 1993 law applied to for-profit corporations controlled by religious families, the New York Times reported. Alito wrote that the requirement for these companies to provide contraception coverage imposed a substantial burden on the companies’ religious liberty and said the government could provide the coverage in other ways.

Alito was joined by justices Antonin ScaliaClarence ThomasAnthony Kennedy and Chief Justice John Roberts.

In her dissent, Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote: “The court’s expansive notion of corporate personhood invites for-profit entities to seek religion-based exemptions from regulations they deem offensive to their faiths.”

Ginsburg was joined in her dissent by justices Elena Kagan, Sonia Sotomayor andStephen Breyer.

The decision applies only to closely held corporations, defined as a privately held company that has a limited number of shareholders with stock that is only traded on occasion. But both Ginsburg and Sotomayor said that the ruling “is bound to have untoward effects” in other areas.

Gallup noted that from 1973 to 2006, when President George W. Bush nominated Alito, “the Supreme Court maintained confidence ratings in the 40s and 50s in all but one poll.” But by 2007, a year after Alito was confirmed, the Supreme Court's confidence rating dropped sharply to 34 percent and has not reached 40 percent since that time.

Congress also hit a record confidence rating in the Gallup poll, dropping to just 7 percent, down from 13 percent in 2012. Confidence in the presidency fell to 29 percent, its lowest rating of Barack Obama’s presidency and the lowest since it stood at 26 percent in 2008 under Bush. The all-time low confidence rating in the presidency was 25 percent in 2007.

Punditty is based in Santa Cruz, California, United States of America, and is an Anchor on Allvoices.

 

Originally Posted by DennisKalita:

The GOP's court is a "legal" farce

United States Supreme Court can being controlled and manipulated like a puppet on a string for only one specific group, political party or demographic, turns American Democracy into a dictatorship.  

Originally Posted by DennisKalita:

The GOP's court is a "legal" farce

United States Supreme Court can being controlled and manipulated like a puppet on a string for only one specific group, political party or demographic, turns American Democracy into a dictatorship.

Now if that is not sexism I don't know what is.  

 

This "decision" is actually legislating religious beliefs, i.e., "Mixing Church and State", which is Unconstitutional. The United States Supreme Court has just may a heavily right-winged religiously biased decision in this ruling. Frankly, any discussion, procedure, prescription or discussion between you and your doctor is not your employer's business.  Not only does this ruling violate your "Right To Privacy" and Doctor-Patient Confidentiality, [and not how our "New media" is steering clear of these talking points/points of inquiry], but it also favors one (religious) viewpoint while ignoring all others. 

 

They do things like this to "test" the waters or to slowly-but-surely "condition" the public, bit-by-bit, to accept violations of the United States Constitution, Civil Rights and deliberate misinterpretation of Laws as perfectly constitutional, legal or right.  

 

But there was an angry mob, which included women, toting hateful signs and sticks at a bus load of children in San Francisco today.

 

Only in The United States of Clowns America.   

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