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Never seen it, never heard about it...

I wonder how 2 people from Baltimore can consider themselves "African". Being "African" is more than dark skin, dashikis and kente cloth....

I don't have any negative thoughts about it, but I don't think that it's "needed". It's not like Blacks (i mean "African-Americans") have been desirous of a flag to identify with....
quote:
I don't have any negative thoughts about it, but I don't think that it's "needed". It's not like Blacks (i mean "African-Americans") have been desirous of a flag to identify with....

Why don't you quit faking!

If your Rush Limbaugh word "desirous" was absent then why is the RED, the BLACK and the GREEN seen with these other flags from around the world?

http://www.keeling-puri-peaceplaza.com/flagcourt.htm
quote:
Originally posted by isistah:
http://www.nbccongress.org/black-catholics/african-american-flag.asp

Have you seen this flag?

I have not seen the flag.

I heard about it the first time last week when when an irate white guy complained about it hanging in an African-American exhibit in the main library here in Baltimore.

[b]I'll bet he was irate. But I'll bet he didn't offer a reason for being irate. Each time I have encountered such a person the answer has ranged from "just because" to "You got your's. I got mine." alluding to the Confederate Flag.[/B}

What do you think about it? Is it needed?


[B]I think African America definitley needs a banner to call its own. That's why I designed one in 1996. You see it on every post I make on the board.

It is not only needed, it is critical that there be such a flag. If African American is an ethnicity, if African America is an ancestral nationality, there has to a banner for that identity. It is true for African American just as it is true for every other ethnicity, and ancestral nationality in the world.

The discussion of the flag is available on the website of The Institute for African American National Heritage at: http://www.iaanh2.org]

PEACE

Jim Chester

You are who you say you are. Your children are who you say you are.

[This message was edited by James Wesley Chester on November 05, 2003 at 07:56 PM.]
Sorry, not feeling that flag. Jim Chesters avatar is actually more representative of an "African American" flag, IMO.

I'm not one to buy little 'things' when I go to fairs, parades, etc... but one day at the African American day parade, I saw what I felt was a excellent representation of an African American flag, it had the traditional (red, black, and green thick panels,) but in the center of the flag was the outline of Africa. I bought it and still have it today.

Allow me to describe the absolute nicest representation of an African American flag that I have seen: a traditional American flag, superimpose the outline of Africa such that the top left quadrant of Africa has the stars, and the rest has the stripes, then take that shape of africa with a portion of the American flag over it the apply a gold perimiter, finally place that in the center of the traditional red, black, and green stripped flag, vola.


Here is why:

1) First we are Black people, we our Blackness is represented by the traditional red, black and green, that is the majority of the flag.

2) In the heart of our Blackness is the Motherland (notice that it is bacially in the heart of earth, and that the human heart is shaped like it as well).

3) The thin vain of gold around the perimiter signifies our rich culture and our abundance of resources (if only we would use them).

and

4) That portion of the US flag, represents only a fraction of our representation in America, but yet we proudly display it across our heart.

>

... its time for Prosperity


> >  >



An African American Board Game Of Wealth & Success.


[This message was edited by Our Empowerment on November 06, 2003 at 08:21 PM.]
Flags of ancestral nationality are important. Flags of any declaration national or otherwise are important. If you don't understand the significance of a flag, you don't understand the significance of what, or who, the flag represents.

Every person's selection of a flag to represent themselves is clearly important. Typically, people, of commonality, see the same flag as being representative of them as a group. That hasn't happened for African Americans, yet. It will.

Most African Americans look on the "Red, Black, and Green" of the flag coming out of Marcus Garvey's "Back-to-Africa" movement as belonging to/representing them. I did. But, strangely, I never, ever, saw the flag in any display by organizations, including churches, or by people on their homes, or even in community orgainzation. But then I live in a very small African American population.

But that has not always been true. The same phenomenon was observed then as well. Something prevents us from publicly claiming a group identity, except that of color, of course. If color is your color is your identity, there is little urgency for a flag. You are your flag. You are your banner.

There seems to be a "peevishness" about other minorities having a flag. A certain disdain. A "so what" attitude. I suppose there are a lot of characterizations that fit.

I think African America deserves a flag. But first one has to realise and accept the fact that African America is real. A lot of people who say, "I am an African American." don't accept/recognize that African America is real.

When that happens, we will demand a flag.

I already picked one.

Please note above left.

PEACE

Jim Chester

You are who you say you are. Your children are who you say you are.
Just to correct, my earlier post saying I had not seen or heard of the flag referenced by isistah.

While at breakfast, I was mulling over this thread. I remembered I had seen this flag before. It was in the area of '97 or '98. Maybe earlier, but I don't think so. I remember being encouraged that others like me were realizing the need for a banner specific to us, as African Americans.

PEACE

Jim Chester

You are who you say you are. Your children are who you say you are.
The link I posted above leads to more African-American flags. I'm leaning towards the Unity Flag, if we have to have one. I don't think it's necessary at this time, because, like Jim Chester says, we seem to have a problem with publicly displaying a group identity. I can't see a flag being a rallying point for us at this time.

Yes, the Confederate Flag was brought into the local arguement. I don't have a problem with any of these flags being displayed, but flying them is another story.
I'm not feeling the flag either. The traditional colors of black nationalism (red, black and green) are totally minimized in the flag. I have to applaud their effort, but there are several African and Diasporic flags out there already to choose from. Although, my favorite, besides Jim's Smile, is the confederate flag done in the red, black and green. That was an artists depiction of the flag that was shown at the Met Museum of Art here in NYC. It was really interesting.
quote:
Originally posted by Yssys:
I'm not feeling the flag either. The traditional colors of black nationalism (red, black and green) are totally minimized in the flag. I have to applaud their effort, but there are several African and Diasporic flags out there already to choose from. Although, my favorite, besides Jim's Smile, is the confederate flag done in the red, black and green. That was an artists depiction of the flag that was shown at the Met Museum of Art here in NYC. It was really interesting.


Yssys:

I am truly complimented that my flag is on your list of favorites. Naturally, I hope it makes No. 1.

The rendition of the Confederate flag you mentioned evoked two thoughts.

1. Artist free expression.

2. Why compliment such an insulting symbol
with the colors of ancestors? I do see
the "in your face" statement of the piece.

While the artist certainly has the right to do this, as artistic ecpression, I can feel volumes welling to say, "Don't do it!!

I suppose I'm very possessive about something so close to me and who I am.

I'm trying to grow to be better/bigger.

PEACE

Jim Chester

You are who you say you are. Your children are who you say you are.

[This message was edited by James Wesley Chester on November 07, 2003 at 01:00 PM.]
That's the reason I like the artist's rendition of the confederate flag because it does smack of that sarcasm and in your face attitude. Nothing makes me happier than to make a red-neck turn red! LOL
This artist also did the Israeli Flag with Palestinian colors, and other flags with their opposing colors. This was on Africana quite a while ago.

Our people have made the mistake of confusing the methods with the objectives. As long as we agree on objectives, we should never fall out with each other just because we believe in different methods, or tactics, or strategy. We have to keep in mind at all times that we are not fighting for separation. We are fighting for recognition as free humans in this society
Malcolm X, 1965
isistah:

Thanks for that link.

I noticed one of the flag designs had been patented. There may have been more.

When I designed my offering of a flag for African America, I considered making it proprietary by either patent for manufacturing or copyright for design. The initial issue of the flag carried a claim of copyright.

It became clear to me that if the flag is to be the flag for African America it has to belong to the people of African America. Then there is the issue of recognition. Well, no one is going to remember me anyway. And besides, my kids know who designed and made the flag in their homes. Anything beyond that is just "extras."

The issue is possession.

The flag of a nation belongs to the nation.

P.S. After looking at all the flags I found on the link, I like mine better. I truly, truly think it is the statement of our heritage from 1509 when the Spanish left the first 100 of us in South Carolina.

PEACE

Jim Chester

You are who you say you are. Your children are who you say you are.
quote:
Originally posted by James Wesley Chester:

It became clear to me that if the flag is to be the flag for African America it has to belong to the people of African America. Then there is the issue of recognition. Well, no one is going to remember me anyway. And besides, my kids know who designed and made the flag in their homes. Anything beyond that is just "extras."




I don't know about that, Jim. Who in America doesn't know the name, Betsey Ross. You might want to look into that copyright. I think you're more on target than the Harveys.
isistah:

Good advice, and seriously taken. I have some experience if fighting copyright. I have lawyers looking in current status. The flag has been in public use by me, and my company, and with public acknowledgement for about seven years. I also have manufacturing constraints in place.

I plan to be very open with any needed licensing, or usage arrangements, should such a demand occur.

PEACE

Jim Chester

You are who you say you are. Your children are who you say you are.

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