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I was watching CNN this morning......and was amazed, when hearing about this.

This shows that we as a people 'still' hate ourselves.......


A Girl Like Me

7:08 min
Youth Documentary
Kiri Davis, Director, Reel Works Teen Filmmaking, Producer

Winner of the Diversity Award
Sponsored by Third Millennium Foundation
ABOUT THE FILM
More About A Girl Like Me from Director Kiri Davis

For my high-school literature class I was constructing an anthology with a wide range of different stories that I believed reflected the black girl's experience. For the different chapters, I conducted interviews with a variety of black girls in my high school, and a number of issues surfaced concerning the standards of beauty imposed on today's black girls and how this affects their self-image. I thought this topic would make an interesting film and so when I was accepted into the Reel Works Teen Filmmaking program, I set out to explore these issues. I also decided to would reconduct the "doll test" initially conducted by Dr. Kenneth Clark, which was used in the historic desegregation case, Brown vs. Board of Education. I thought that by including this experiment in my film, I would shed new light on how society affects black children today and how little has actually changed.

With help from my mentor, Shola Lynch, and thanks to the honesty and openness of the girls I interviewed, I was able to complete my first documentary in the fall of 2005. I learned that giving the girls an opportunity to talk about these issues and their experiences helped us all to look deeper and examine the many things in society that affect us and shape who we are.


http://www.uthtv.com/umedia/collection/2052/
```````````````````````` "Dipped in chocolate, bronzed with elegance, enameled with grace, toasted with beauty. "My Lord, she is a Black woman!" -Yosef Ben-Jochannan
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Every doll my daughter owns is black except one...and that was given to her by her mother (who is black so why buy your child a white doll is completely beyond me. Confused) when I was in Iraq. I look at that doll everyday and get sick to my stomach but don't have the heart to get rid of it since it's one of the few things my daughter has recieved from the ex wife. So I swallow my feelings and bear with it. But I won't front; when I got back home and saw that doll in my daughters arms, I damn near broke down and cried.
My mother didnt allow me or my sister to play with white dolls. She mentioned that when she was little, there were no black dolls to play with, and she found the white doll, with its beautiful hair.....and fair skin to be beautiful.

It didnt matter to me one way or another.

But as i was watching this video.......i was sad.

There is a little girl, that picked the white doll as 'good'.........and the black doll as 'bad'. When asked which doll did 'she' look like.........she pushed the black doll forward. You could see the shame on her face.

I dont get it.......what are 'we' as a community doing to ourselves???
thanks

I saw the CNN story, and was looking for this, but had trouble finding it on the web.

15 out of 21 girls prefered the white doll. Of those who prefeerred the black doll, most were immigrant children.

She also recounted on CNN the extreme difficulty that she had even finding a black doll to use for the test. Toy stores simply didn't have any in stock.
This was an interesting documentary, and there were parts of the documentary that I enjoyed. However, many of questions asked by the interviewer were suggestive. Instead of asking the children which doll is good, and which doll is bad, the interviewer should've asked if the children if they had ever thought of a doll as being good or bad. Now that the interviewer has asked these questions, some children may go home wondering if they should assign "good" and "bad" labels to the colors of dolls, or even to the colors of people. In my view, the interviewer used poor judgement in deciding to ask small children questions like these.
Last edited {1}
quote:
Originally posted by Rowe:
This was an interesting documentary, and there were parts of the documentary that I really enjoyed viewing. However, many of questions the interviewer had for the children participating in the study were suggestive. So that the interviewer could not be charged with trying to impose her opinions on the participants, the interviewer should have asked if any of participants had ever thought of a doll as being good or bad, instead of asking, "Which doll is 'good' and which doll is 'bad'?" (which gives participants very few choices to make, other than the ones she already has in her mind). A good interviewer, however, always asks open-ended questions, and assume nothing.

Some children may not have even thought of a doll as being "good" or "bad." But now that the interviewer has asked these questions, which are loaded with implied messages, some children will go home wondering if they should assign "good" and "bad" labels to the colors of dolls, or even to the colors of people. Consequently, this line of questioning could, in fact, be described as a form of racial socialization and/or brainwashing, which jeopardizes the credibility of this study. The interviewer had no right to ask small children questions like these or to fill these children's heads up with implied messages.


^^excellent points...
quote:
Originally posted by virtue/Khalliqa:
quote:
Originally posted by Rowe:
This was an interesting documentary, and there were parts of the documentary that I really enjoyed viewing. However, many of questions the interviewer had for the children participating in the study were suggestive. So that the interviewer could not be charged with trying to impose her opinions on the participants, the interviewer should have asked if any of participants had ever thought of a doll as being good or bad, instead of asking, "Which doll is 'good' and which doll is 'bad'?" (which gives participants very few choices to make, other than the ones she already has in her mind). A good interviewer, however, always asks open-ended questions, and assume nothing.

Some children may not have even thought of a doll as being "good" or "bad." But now that the interviewer has asked these questions, which are loaded with implied messages, some children will go home wondering if they should assign "good" and "bad" labels to the colors of dolls, or even to the colors of people. Consequently, this line of questioning could, in fact, be described as a form of racial socialization and/or brainwashing, which jeopardizes the credibility of this study. The interviewer had no right to ask small children questions like these or to fill these children's heads up with implied messages.


^^excellent points...


I wish one of these children were inquistive enough to ask the interviewer "What do you mean which doll is good or bad? It's just a doll, how is it going to be good or bad?

Most children, even at this age, are very good at picking up on implied messages. But because children instinctively want to please adults and other authority figures in order to get what they want (e.g., treats, praise, and guidance), children will typically give (correct) answers that are sure to win an adult's approval. And I could tell by the body language, self-expression, and the tone of the childrens' voices, when answering the interviewer's questions, that many of them were just saying things they knew the interviewer wanted to hear. I didn't like this interview at all. The only part of the documentary that I thought was legit was the segment interviewing teenagers who discussed their feelings about media images and Western standards of beauty.
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quote:
Originally posted by virtue/Khalliqa:
Rowe do you personally identify with any of this??



What do you mean? If what you're asking is why why am I personally offended by the interviewer's questions, then I'll you that it is because I don't like it when small children, who are unable to verbally defend themselves, are being manipulated. These interviewers knew exactly what they were doing when they drew up these questions. In an effort to get a message across to viewers ("Blacks are negatively impacted by media images"), these interviewers compromised the credibility of this study by possibly negatively influencing these children.
Last edited {1}
quote:
Originally posted by HonestBrother:
I guess I wanted opinions on the picture ... It's one of mine ... I thought it relevant to the topic ... anyway... I thought Rowe, especially, would like it ... sorry to bother you ...


^^You didn't have to delete it..

just give a little explanation of what type of response you're looking for...
I appreciate the pictures... they made me think of something...

The two women could pass for sisters were it not for their coloring.... they have the same jaw structure...

These pictures are helpful in discussing colorism, and what images our young girls see..

The picture of the first woman though she may be walking with the second, would get noticed first by men..... if they existed in my world circa (*cough* erm 70's/80's Atlanta)

young girls notice these subtleties and internalize them.... being noticed.. passed over, ignored, the overt rejection usually comes early in the form of relatives pointing out characteristics they feel are negative.... and later boys/men.....

they may not pick a doll on the basis of "good" or "bad" they may simply pick the one that they feel is most "pleasing to the eye"
quote:
Originally posted by msprettygirl:
Rowe- since the interviewer was emulating a past experiement she may have simply asked the questions as they were asked in the first experiment and not thought to change them or how they were delievered.


sigh...

back on topic,

that's a good point Ms.PrettyGirl... but don't you think Rowe's point about the question's inherent pressure on the children would still be valid..?

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