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Hypothetical of course. Has anyone heard of, or seen this film? The premise sounds interesting, but troubling.
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IN THEATERS FEBRUARY 3, 2006

The second film in Lars von Trier's American trilogy, picking up where DOGVILLE left off, is another technically audacious, gleefully brash condemnation of American society, this time focusing on the horrific legacy of slavery. in MANDERLAY, Grace (Bryce Dallas Howard, replacing Nicole Kidman) and her father (Willem Dafoe, replacing James Caan) have arrived at the gates of a plantation in Alabama. When an elderly black woman knocks on the car door asking for help, Grace sees an opportunity to become a heroic woman of action. Sending her father away, Grace settles in Manderlay, where she tries to get the African-American workers to embrace their freedom once and for all. But for some reason, it appears that everyone--from the wise Wilhelm (Danny Glover) to the stubborn Thomas (Michael Abiteboul) to the strong Timothy (Isaach de Bankole)--is content to live a life of subservience. Her futile attempt to instill pride in the group takes its toll, rendering Grace exhausted, defeated, and hopeless. Like DOGVILLE, von Trier's film is shot on a soundstage in a theatrically stylized manner that will confound many viewers, but the committed performances humanize the film and give it its cold, bitter heart.

This film screened as part of Lincoln Center's 2005 New York Film Festival.

MPAA Rating: Not Rated
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quote:
Originally posted by HonestBrother:
Nayo, have you seen any of von Trier's previous films? "Breaking Waves", "Dancer In The Dark", but especially "Dogville"? They're ALL - in different ways - very troubling.

I really enjoyed Dogville. No I haven't heard about the new film but I'd love to see it now that I have.



Yes, I have seen Dogville, Nicole Kidman was very good in this. Von triers attempt to twist
the hegelian 'slave-master; dynamic is weirdly entertaining. His use of 'rape' as the methodology for the transformation of an independent consciousness, into a(n) dependent/interdependent consciousness is, different, But is'nt that what happened to the African, the rape of one people, powerfully and completely by another?

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