OSHUN AUSET

When I created this section it was done so, in part, with the idea of exposing a bit more of members exactly like Oshun Auset. She is one of our most passionate and committed warriors for justice and liberation. I couldn't have more respect and admiration for who she is and how she does her thing here. appl

Here's her 20Q:




Finish the sentence:

1) I get personal inspiration from . . . the ancestors.

2) The thing that really makes me most happy in life now is . . . music, it's always been the thing that makes me the most happy.

3) Five years from now I am going to . . .
be living in Africa.

4) If I could have anyone to a dinner party, I would invite . . . Hugo Chavez, and then I would tell him to drop Marisabel and get with this 'negra'.

5) My favorite book is . . . Yurugu

Word Association:

6) Black Feminism - an oxymoron.

7) Ancient Egypt - KMT, the beginning.

8) Hip Hop - Look what they did to us!

9) Bill Cosby - The playboy mansion exploits.

10) Socialism - The political manifestation of the answer to global capitalist oppression and exploitation.

Choices:

11) Marcus Garvey or Malcolm X?

Marcus, because Malcolm's parents were UNIA-ACL/Garveryite members and Elijah Muhammad structured the NOI after the UNIA by his own admission. If there were no Marcus, there wouldn't be a Malcolm.

12) Kwame Nkrumah or Kwame Toure?

Ideologically they were the same so that isn't a choice.

13) Samuel L. Jackson or Laurence Fishburne?

Samuel L Jackson because he can curse someone out better.

14) A night out on the town or a quiet evening at home?

A night out on the town, I am single and always looking to recruit people and get contacts(politically speaking of course).

15) A good book or a good movie?

A good book. I've learned more from books than movies.

General Questions

16) What is your first memory in life?

People watching on Venice Beach from the point of view of a stroller.

17) How many generations can you go back in your family?

I don't know the exact #, but I was lucky enough to have an aunt who researched the family tree back to Haiti.

18) What do you think has to occur for your vision for African America to be realized?

African America doesn't exist. If you meant my vision for Africans in Amerikkka, Pan Africanism would have to be realized.

19) If you can eliminate one form of oppression today, what would it be?

That's a hard one. My knee jerk reaction is to say race based oppression, but I have an inkling that all forms of oppression are derived from the oppression of the devine feminine by patriarchial societies.

20) What would have to happen for the oppressed all over the world to unite against their oppressors?

Several things, initially, the oppression must become much worse. Finally, a globally organized vanguard(critical mass) would have to initiate revolution. The masses will follow when they see it serves their interests.


© MBM

Original Post
quote:
Originally posted by MBM:
OSHUN AUSET

When I created this section it was done so, in part, with the idea of exposing a bit more of members exactly like Oshun Auset. She is one of our most passionate and committed warriors for justice and liberation. I couldn't have more respect and admiration for who she is and how she does her thing here. appl

Here's her 20Q:




Finish the sentence:

1) I get personal inspiration from . . . the ancestors.

2) The thing that really makes me most happy in life now is . . . music, it's always been the thing that makes me the most happy.

3) Five years from now I am going to . . .
be living in Africa.

4) If I could have anyone to a dinner party, I would invite . . . Hugo Chavez, and then I would tell him to drop Marisabel and get with this 'negra'.

5) My favorite book is . . . Yurugu

Word Association:

6) Black Feminism - an oxymoron.

7) Ancient Egypt - KMT, the beginning.

8) Hip Hop - Look what they did to us!

9) Bill Cosby - The playboy mansion exploits.

10) Socialism - The political manifestation of the answer to global capitalist oppression and exploitation.

Choices:

11) Marcus Garvey or Malcolm X?

Marcus, because Malcolm's parents were UNIA-ACL/Garveryite members and Elijah Muhammad structured the NOI after the UNIA by his own admission. If there were no Marcus, there wouldn't be a Malcolm.

12) Kwame Nkrumah or Kwame Toure?

Ideologically they were the same so that isn't a choice.

13) Samuel L. Jackson or Laurence Fishburne?

Samuel L Jackson because he can curse someone out better.

14) A night out on the town or a quiet evening at home?

A night out on the town, I am single and always looking to recruit people and get contacts(politically speaking of course).

15) A good book or a good movie?

A good book. I've learned more from books than movies.

General Questions

16) What is your first memory in life?

People watching on Venice Beach from the point of view of a stroller.

17) How many generations can you go back in your family?

I don't know the exact #, but I was lucky enough to have an aunt who researched the family tree back to Haiti.

18) What do you think has to occur for your vision for African America to be realized?

African America doesn't exist. If you meant my vision for Africans in Amerikkka, Pan Africanism would have to be realized.

19) If you can eliminate one form of oppression today, what would it be?

That's a hard one. My knee jerk reaction is to say race based oppression, but I have an inkling that all forms of oppression are derived from the oppression of the devine feminine by patriarchial societies.

20) What would have to happen for the oppressed all over the world to unite against their oppressors?

Several things, initially, the oppression must become much worse. Finally, a globally organized vanguard(critical mass) would have to initiate revolution. The masses will follow when they see it serves their interests.




appl appl appl appl

First let me say -- you, Oshun Auset, are absolutely BEAUTIFUL!!! Smile

I don't know why, but I've always pictured you as an older woman. . .hmmmmmm. 19 Talk about way off base. LOL.

Anyway, I have a question to the following Q & A:

2) The thing that really makes me most happy in life now is . . . music, it's always been the thing that makes me the most happy.

Fab: What type of music do you listen to? Smile
quote:
Originally posted by Fabulous:
appl appl appl appl

First let me say -- you, Oshun Auset, are absolutely BEAUTIFUL!!! Smile

I don't know why, but I've always pictured you as an older woman. . .hmmmmmm.

Anyway, I have a question to the following Q & A:

2) The thing that really makes me most happy in life now is . . . music, it's always been the thing that makes me the most happy.

What type of music do you listen to? Smile


Ahhh, thanks.

I'm older than I look though.

Mainly Roots and Lovers Rock Reggae make me the happiest, but I also like some R&B/Soul, conscious Hip-Hop, and a lot of other diasporan and continental African music(Lingala, Samba, Highlife, Soca ect.)
First off, thank you Oshun Auset, for sharing a little more of yourself and your view. And thanks to MBM for the interview.

quote:
6) Black Feminism - an oxymoron.



Oshun, may I ask you to expand a little on your answer... why do you see Black Feminism as an oxymoron?

OK... if that's opening a can of worms, just say Pass! Big Grin but I am curious. Thanks. Smile
quote:
Originally posted by FireFly:
First off, thank you Oshun Auset, for sharing a little more of yourself and your view. And thanks to MBM for the interview.

quote:
6) Black Feminism - an oxymoron.



Oshun, may I ask you to expand a little on your answer... why do you see Black Feminism as an oxymoron?

OK... if that's opening a can of worms, just say Pass! Big Grin but I am curious. Thanks. Smile


It is a can of worms but here it goes...

"The women's liberation movement of the late 1960s and 1970s, the largest and most influential movement in U.S. history, was born from the civil rights movement. Despite these origins, black feminists often felt disrespected and excluded by white feminists and established independent black feminist organizations. This racial alienation weakened the movement and continues to this day, but has rarely been explored by scholars.

This article is also eye opening on why I said that...

http://race.eserver.org/sisters-of-the-yam.html

I personally have experienced the race class assumptions/ommissions from the White feminist movement and erks the hell ot of me.

My favorite is that old addage that "Women were fighting to work outside of the home, and that wasn't accomplished until the feminist movement." Like Black women haven't ALWAYS worked(hard labout I might add) in this country since we were brought here forcibly.

An end to gender oppression, yes. Identification with the White run feminist movement to attain this, no.
your answer is much appreciated. I've read the link, and other links on the website, thank you.
I'm a huge fan of bell hooks - I 'discovered' her via her book Reel to Real on race and identity in the media, and am currently dipping in and out of Outlaw Culture. hooks is the most erudite and heartfelt AA woman writer I've come across.
quote:
Originally posted by Oshun Auset:
quote:
Originally posted by Fabulous:
appl appl appl appl

First let me say -- you, Oshun Auset, are absolutely BEAUTIFUL!!! Smile

I don't know why, but I've always pictured you as an older woman. . .hmmmmmm.

Anyway, I have a question to the following Q & A:

2) The thing that really makes me most happy in life now is . . . music, it's always been the thing that makes me the most happy.

What type of music do you listen to? Smile


Ahhh, thanks.

I'm older than I look though.

Mainly Roots and Lovers Rock Reggae make me the happiest, but I also like some R&B/Soul, conscious Hip-Hop, and a lot of other diasporan and continental African music(Lingala, Samba, Highlife, Soca ect.)


Thank you for your answer. Smile You have great taste in music. tfro
I loved reading this intereview!!!!!!! appl bow This was actually one of the interviews to which I was most looking forward. And I can't believe that you and I Sister Oshun share the same favorite book. Yurugu: An African-Centered Critique of European Cultural Thought and Behavior (1994) by Marimba Ani is my favorite book as well. I came to life, consciously, after reading this book. When you have time, I'd love for you to briefly describe how this book influenced you. Smile
I love this interview, and I strongly admire everything I've come to learn about you, Oshun!

You are destined to do great things. I'm proud to "know" you, to the extent that I do. It would make me pleased as punch to one day be able to confidently claim to have touch you in some way, however small, through some post at some point. You're clearly headed for big things, which will benefit a great many of us. Thanks for being such a voice of intelligence, uplift, and love.

That's my trademark long-winded way of saying, you go girl!!! rock

OH YEAH... I'm sure AudioGuy might have eventually asked you this, but on the subject of music, did you ever end up checking out Fertile Ground?
quote:
Originally posted by Rowe:
I loved reading this intereview!!!!!!! appl bow This was actually one of the interviews to which I was most looking forward. And I can't believe that you and I Sister Oshun share the same favorite book. Yurugu: An African-Centered Critique of European Cultural Thought and Behavior (1994) by Marimba Ani is my favorite book as well. I came to life, consciously, after reading that book. When you have time, I'd love for you to briefly describe how this book influenced you. Smile


Coming from you Rowe, this is a huge compliment.

Briefly describe yurugu's infuence? That's impossible, revalations from that book keep on coming.

But I'll do a brief post on 'it' in the near future.
quote:
Originally posted by Vox:
I love this interview, and I strongly admire everything I've come to learn about you, Oshun!

You are destined to do great things. I'm proud to "know" you, to the extent that I do. It would make me pleased as punch to one day be able to confidently claim to have touch you in some way, however small, through some post at some point. You're clearly headed for big things, which will benefit a great many of us. Thanks for being such a voice of intelligence, uplift, and love.

That's my trademark long-winded way of saying, you go girl!!! rock

OH YEAH... I'm sure AudioGuy might have eventually asked you this, but on the subject of music, did you ever end up checking out Fertile Ground?


Thanks Vox,

I always read your posts. Between you, Rowe, and a few other posters, I can't post half the time because I would just be repeating what was already said. You in particular open me up to a point or point of view I wasn't thinking about often. I learn a lot on this site.

-My long winded way of saying, yes, you have 'touched me'.

I was just listenning to Fertile Ground last night. music
Your picture is surprising.

I too expected an older 'looking' woman...and I would never try to guess.

It's never been an issue

Your responses were consistent with your posts. I would have been astonished if they weren't.

I have archived your posts for quite a while as I have told you several times.

I've always liked the way youl process information.

You are a plus for us as a people.

Stay strong.

PEACE

Jim Chester
Yah, yah, yah, I'm a youngun'. Thta's why I try to respect my elders when we are debating!(lol).---Oshun Auset

I often think one of the worse things I have done on the board is responding on the 'birthday' thread.

While the 'respect thing' is appreciated,...and I understand the intent of your statement, ideas and opinions should be the focus of exchange.

None of us should except (oops. expect) it, and certainly never demand it.

We should 'sink or float' on the merit of what we say.


PEACE

Jim Chester
Oshun,

I too enjoy and respect reading your post. I have a unique interest in your thoughts mainly because you are my first experience of AfricanAmerica.org.

quote:
2) The thing that really makes me most happy in life now is . . . music, it's always been the thing that makes me the most happy


I share those sentiments
My sister OA!! You have been one of my favorites from day one! I remember reading one of you first posts and I thought "this siter here does not play... she hits hard and cuts deep!!" It was either about perms or sororities...

What I want to know is this: What made you the revolutionary that you are? Have you always been that way or was there a "lightbulb moment" that changed the course of your life? Were you born with a little Black glove covering your clenched fist?

I also want to know if you have read the book "Assata" and if so, what are your thoughts about Al Sharpton?
quote:
Originally posted by AudioGuy:
My sister OA!! You have been one of my favorites from day one! I remember reading one of you first posts and I thought "this sister here does not play... she hits hard and cuts deep!!" It was either about perms or sororities...


Thanks AG.

quote:
What I want to know is this: What made you the revolutionary that you are? Have you always been that way or was there a "lightbulb moment" that changed the course of your life? Were you born with a little Black glove covering your clenched fist?


I was always political, my parents were older and were highly anti-Zionist, and I grew up with a whole bunch of racist ass white folks!(conditions create consciousness) I remember playing 'Spot the Zionist propoganda' when I was young. Basically, my parents would give me accolades if I could point out people on TV, either actual Zionists themselves or people that were spitting 'Zionist rhetoric'(I'm serious). They also insisted I watch 'Tony Brown's Journal' EVERY Saturday, and the 'McLaughlin Group' every Sunday. I was surrounded by history books, maps, and other things like that. Both sides of my family were extremely political. My paternal grandparents were very active in the civil rights movement and I have a maternal uncle who is 'associated' with Sinn Féin(the military wing of the IRA) So I guess I couldn't help but come out this way. I can't claim to have had propper 'revolutionary ideology' until I was trained by the A-A.P.R.P. though.

quote:
I also want to know if you have read the book "Assata" and if so, what are your thoughts about Al Sharpton?


Yah, he's an agent, but he talks a good game.
quote:
I was always political, my parents were older and were highly anti-Zionist, and I grew up with a whole bunch of racist ass white folks!(circumstances create consciousness) I remember playing 'Spot the Zionist propoganda' when I was young. Basically, my parents would give me accolades if I could point out people on TV, either actual Zionists themselves or people that were spitting 'Zionist rhetoric'(I'm serious). They also insisted I watch 'Tony Brown's Journal' EVERY Saturday, and the 'McLaughlin Group' every Sunday. I was surrounded by history books, maps, and other things like that. Both sides of my family were extremely political. My paternal grandparents were very active in the civil rights movement and I have a maternal uncle who is 'associated' with Sinn Féin(the military wing of the IRA) So I guess I couldn't help but come out this way. I can't claim to have had propper 'revolutionary ideology' until I was trained by the A-A.P.R.P. though.


I must admit I do enjoy your post/responses but I do have a question and please forgive my ignorance.....

Your uncle that had the association with Sinn Fein, was the relationship more along a political ideology or religious? I always pictured Sinn Fein being motivated by religion rather than racial/political/equality issues and its hard for me to picture how the two could coincide and accomplish much.


catch
quote:
Originally posted by ocatchings:
I must admit I do enjoy your post/responses but I do have a question and please forgive my ignorance.....

Your uncle that had the association with Sinn Fein, was the relationship more along a political ideology or religious? I always pictured Sinn Fein being motivated by religion rather than racial/political/equality issues and its hard for me to picture how the two could coincide and accomplish much.


catch


He had more of a political passion from what I remember(admittedly, I spent a lot of time with him when I was yonger, and we have drifted since.) I remember him going on and on about politics and secret societies. My mother's side of the family is Catholic, but I don't remember him talking about that ad infinum as he did with politics, but that may have been because most of the people in the room were Catholic when I would be around him...
Big PROPS to MBM!!!

This is but one example of why this is the greatest message board on the planet. The vision MBM has, the will to recognize The Giants In Our Midst... as commendable as those recognized.

So I'm in full agreement:
Oshun Auset is one of our most passionate and committed warriors for justice and liberation. I couldn't have more respect and admiration for who she is and how she does her thing...


Again, Big UPS to MBM! tfro
That you are a very special person is without question, Oshun Auset, but I also wanted to say thank you... for your generosity... firstly for always taking the time to actually answer my questions - without bias - and so patiently and informatively. I've learnt a lot from you and it's heartfelt learning.

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