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Tagged With "VIOLENT SADISTIC WESTERN HISTORY"

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Re: Heaven & Hell Before Christ

Oshun Auset ·
Arguing over a name is pointless and stupid. Debating the concepts we hold is important because it is the concepts we have of 'God' that frames our whole world view and determines how we respond to each other, nature and the universe. IMO the dominant world 'response' of Western man is extremely destructive to say the least.
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Re: Aborigines target sudanese refugees

FireFly ·
thanks for this... I haven't been reading newspapers the past week so it's news to me. One thing though, Toowoomba is in Queensland and Balga is in Western Australia. If you look at a map of Australia you'll see we are a h-u-g-e continent and these places are very far apart. And very different. On a positive note, most people feel this way: "Ms Maasakker said the Sudanese had added another dimension to Toowoomba, and made the town more cosmopolitan." and also this way... "Mr Farrell said the...
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Re: Why do souls come to Earth?

MBM ·
I'm asking the question - not making a statement. Your insight is what I'm looking for here. Where do souls come from? They go to Heaven but are conjured from . . .? God is in Heaven. Wouldn't it seem reasonable to think that He creates new souls there? In thinking about it, I guess the question in and of itself is probably contrary to Christianity - since reincarnation is probably not embraced in the Christian tradition (is it?). Your thoughts? P.S. The concept of souls coming down to Earth...
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Re: Reparations and Poor Whites

James Wesley Chester ·
My first reaction remains, 'No.' The Colonies never established a viable economy without slavery. The forced labor created by slavery enabled the creation and maintenance of the cash crops of the agrarian economy that sustained 'The Colonies'. You will recall the economy of The Colonies, from the early 1500s to early 1600s, was hunting and trapping. Furs of various kinds was the cash crop. Slavery enabled all of the European Colonies in the Western Hemisphere. All the 'poor 'whites' you pose...
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Re: Afrocentric versus Eurocentric

Fine ·
Yes. ------------------- Dusty Elbow: We "can" very well talk about Americas slavery and there is alot to talk about: Connecticut Military Law, 1784--forbade blacks from serving in military First Naturalization Law, 1790--congress declared US a white nation Federal Militia Law, 1792--only whites could enlists in peacetime militia Fugitive Slave Law, 1793--protected slaveholders rights, discouraged blacks from running away Virginia Migration Law, 1793--forbade free blacks from entering that...
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Re: Why do souls come to Earth?

Melesi ·
The "second death" is a phrase in the Revelation of John describing spiritual death and one's choice of and consignment to hell. It's not considered a good thing. The western Church for a long time took the Stoic/Neoplatonist idea that the flesh is "bad" and evil, but ever since the Reformation that has not been a serious concept. Now ansd then someone would revive the idea, but it never found much currency. When the Bible became cheap and readily available, the description of the world...
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Re: Panjea live - HOT!

FireFly ·
What others say...and another pic... not great quality but hey I was busy dancing. "What a strange confluence of forces this Californian is. He seems to be a Western white man channelling music from deep in the heart of Africa and the Caribbean diaspora. Unlike most Western people who borrow from African traditions, such as Paul Simon, Mick Fleetwood and Ginger Baker, Berry didn't go on a snatch-and-grab mission. He went to southern Africa in 1990, stayed for more than a decade, married a...
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Re: Question for Kresge?

Rowe ·
This topic is of great interest to me as well. However, because of the diversity of African cultures, and its widespread aspects, I reject the simplistic use of attributive terms such as "ancestor worship," "fetishism," and "animism" as definitions of African religion. Even among converts to Islam or Christianity, you will find elements of traditional African spirituality. In the Hebrew Bible, for example, animal sacrifices are common, rituals are performed, polygamy is an acceptable form of...
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Re: French President Chirac Threatens Genocide

Black Viking ·
Is this typical French double-speak, or have we evolved into an entirely new form? Say, triple-speak?
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Re: What makes caucasians white?

Empty Purnata ·
Actually, "Caucasoid" is a broad geographico-ethnic category that includes many people (not just Whites). The original Caucasoids were Central Asians, Semites and Eastern Europeans near Central Asia. Typical "Caucasoid" features include tan-to-light brown skin, wavy-to-curly hair, big jutting noses, rounded eyes and the ability to grow thick beards. Western Europeans are just barely "Caucasoid" (they are only in that group due to their relation to Eastern Europeans and South Russians), and...
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Re: What makes caucasians white?

Black Viking ·
Yes. That is the birth of Anglo-Saxon. I think it's funny that they don't know that.
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Re: What makes caucasians white?

Empty Purnata ·
On racial categories, one case-in-point on how broad "racial" categories are is Central Asians. Central Asians (peoples from Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Afghanistan, Kahazakstan, Turkey, Iran, etc.)are Caucasoid, yet they don't resemble Western Europeans very much. Central Asians have rounded (actually, semi-Monogoloidic eyes), big noses, fullish lips, wavy and/or curly hair, and brown skin. About 100,000 years ago, some Central Asians traveled eastward into Asia (which...
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Re: The name of our moon?

Empty Purnata ·
Well, Westerners call the Moon "Luna", "Serena" or "Artemis" (personally, "Artemis" is my favorite Western name for the Moon). I'd like to hear what various Africans, Aboriginees, Egyptians, Mesoamericans and Asians called it. The Western name for the Sun is "Sol" (that's the root word in "solar").
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Re: Kola Boof Speaks: Race & Beauty In America

Rowe ·
Sister Marimba Ani (1994), speaking on the collective hypocrisy exhibited by Europeans in Chapter one of her book Yurugu: An African-Centered Critique of European Thought and Behavior believes hypocrisy is a "way of life" for Europeans. She would undoubtedly agree with the explanations you and Brother Nayo have provided. Hypocrisy as a Way of Life Marimba Ani Within the nature of European culture there exists a statement of value or of "moral" behavior that has no meaning for the members of...
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Re: NUBIAN Queen Ti Unearthed

sunnubian ·
What's equally amazing is the fact that the Euro-Western racist historical revisionist did not get a chance to manipulate her obviously African features or had to chance to FIRST publish/distribute whitenized photos of her throughout the world to add to the mythology that those that are the predominate race in Egypt now are the same ones that Built and ruled Egypt thousand of years ago, etc., etc.
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Re: The name of our moon?

FireFly ·
WOW... there are lots of indigenous Australian names for the moon, depending on the region and the concept of 'moon' - whether it's a moon, or a symbol of a crescent shape, or the symbol of a month. I know this is an African American site, but I thought you might be interested. Indigenous Australians developed star navigation systems way back - probably before anyone else on the planet... so I guess that explains it. I could have just posted a short list, but what the heck... here are all...
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Re: A Narrow View of Black Women

FireFly ·
I don't buy women's magazines anymore, but I was flicking through the Australian edition of marie claire at work and noticed, among other women's pics, a picture of Alek Wek in a feature called "Women of the World ... what has changed?" So I thought ok, what does she, or an african woman have to say? I flicked through the pages to see a Bio pic of a woman (supposedly) representing each 'world region' and a brief comment. Not seeing any black faces, disappointed, I realised the only entry for...
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Re: A Narrow View of Black Women

Rowe ·
The public has launched attacks against the fashion industry's narrow standard of beauty for quite some time. In the 80's, for example, there was a great concern for White teenage girls who suffered from anorexia nervosa and bulemia as a result of them trying to look like the super models being featured in popular fashion magazines. Feminists, parents, and other concerned members of the community criticized fashion editors harshly for not featuring "normal-sized" women in their magazines,...
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Re: A Narrow View of Black Women

Frenchy ·
That behavior/mindset extends world-wide. Anna Wintour says straight out that she won't even hire women who aren't pin thin to work in any of her offices because she doesn't want that look associated with Vogue. Karl Lagerfeld was highly pissed that H&M decided to make his stuff in plus sizes because he only "makes clothing for slender women." Europe is the number one champion of Euro beauty. And everyone else follows suit. I don't know if I can really appreciate what Suzy Brokensha has...
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Re: I'm proud to be an American, where at least I know I'm free.

HonestBrother ·
Maybe a better question is "Do we have freedoms that people in other countries don't have?" Comparing ourselves to other industrialized Western nations (Sweden, The Netherlands, England, etc.) one can put forth a good argument that we don't.
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Re: Danish Newspaper And Mohammed Cartoon

Empty Purnata ·
I have no sympathy for that kind of bullshit. I can't stand the fucking anti-PC crowd that tries to hide racism and bigotry behind "freedom of speech". "Oh, we have freedom of speech to say what we want! That's what makes Western society great! Freedom of expression and exchange. And after all, sometimes the truth is ugly." OH FUCK YOU!! These same "anti-PC" c*nts would scream for censorship if I drew a cartoon depicting Adolph Hitler baking Jews, or if I drew a cartoon depicting White...
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Re: Danish Newspaper And Mohammed Cartoon

kresge ·
Like Black Viking, I am not anti-PC, but I am anti-censorship. Whether or not I find the comic offensive, I think that a publication has the right to print it and I believe that individuals have the right to protest against it non-violently. I support their right to censure (express harsh criticism of the picture) but not to censor (control the press, speech, artistic expression). Free expression to my mind is integral to democratic society. Personal anecdote: I was a chaplain in NYC when...
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Re: Danish Newspaper And Mohammed Cartoon

Faheem ·
This is one of the problems with Western Media and its Johnny come lately reporting and its refusal to state truth when it is widely known. Most men and women in America and some of you on this forum believe that these protest just started a few weeks ago, and started off violently. These cartoons as most articles have noted were first published in September, the protest against these cartoons began then. The protest were all peaceful, the Danish Muslim community wrote letters, Muslim...
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Re: Danish Newspaper And Mohammed Cartoon

HonestBrother ·
This reminds of the Republican/corporate media response to Joseph Lowery's comments about Bush yesterday. They're not saying anything about "free speech" there. Instead he's accused of using Mrs. King's death for political purposes. It's only "free speech" when it expresses a pro-white/pro-USA/pro-corporate-power point of view.
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Re: Danish Newspaper And Mohammed Cartoon

UppityNegress ·
The cartoons were originally commisioned to test the boundaries of free speech in Denmark. An ethnically Danish author who was writing a pro-Muslim children's book on Islam, couldn't find anyone to illustrate it for fear of violence and persecution from the Muslims in Denmark. He questioned whether political correctness in regards to Muslims was hindering free speech in the country. The newspaper drawings were meant as a test--granted, a rather childish one. The smarter option would have...
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Re: Danish Newspaper And Mohammed Cartoon

Nmaginate ·
BUT you did not answer me question and "I stand by my view" that the Christ and Christian images are not comparably "sacred" in Christendom. Symbols of Christ, no matter what the lay or particular Christians feel about them [read: Christians angry enough over 'The Last Tempation of Christ' to call in bomb threats] , just aren't as sacred. It just doesn't translate. It's not the same language or the same word. There's a deeper, different meaning because of the very different tradition in...
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Re: Another Danish? Noah's "I wonder what?"

UppityNegress ·
In this day in age, yes I do think American Christians would be more "civil" about it, and considering how secular western Europe has become I'd question whether it would even make a dent outside of religious circles. Will they [Christians, esp. white] raise a fuss? Of course. Will they be super pissed? That goes without saying. Protest? Sure. Threats to actually kill other people, burn down the newspaper facility, and encourage others into suicide missions? You'll be hard pressed to find...
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Re: Danish Newspaper And Mohammed Cartoon

kresge ·
Yes, democracy means problems and conflicts without an ultimate resolution. This does mean that some situations might reach an amicable conclusion, but as soon as one problem is solved, many more would arise. I do not believe that democracy is a state of affairs. It is a process, dynamic, dialogical, agonistic, and messy. Does that answer your question?
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Re: Feminist, Masculinist, or Other

FireFly ·
i really like this question... but I'm not sure how to approach it. My understanding is that African society is/was matriachal, whereas western culture is patriarchal. I don't see why societies can't be pamatriarchal?? For real, I can't understand why men and women can't work in unison as a partnership. My relationships have been that way and people cannot relate at all. Why the heck not? Why does it have to me male vs. female? Why can't there be balance? Are people afraid of that? I don't...
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Re: New Black Conservative Website

Noah The African ·
Toussaint, you seem to be a less intellectually worthy opponent than in the past, unless I am confusing you with someone else. First, do not put words in my mouth. I never made a pro or con argument in regards to free trade, my argument was against your denial of zero sums. The first thing that you need to note about Hong Kong is that it was a City-state, like Singapore. These small populations are easily turned around by direct foreign investment from large wealthy nations, pumping in...
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Re: Changing 'black' studies for the times

Oshun Auset ·
I don't want to be rude to an elder, but the posts that I read from you as of late JWC show a level of ignorance and self hate I didn't know you had. You really have displayed a repulsive us/them mentality when it comes to the African diaspora. Divide and conquor goes beyond the plantation. Are you even concerned about our liberation? I'm one of those Africans born in Amerikkka that also fits the description of the 'they' you referred to... I hope you aren't suggesting that because I don't...
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Re: New Black Conservative Website

toussaint ·
It really takes a true spin artist to take an unprecedented decrease in poverty and turn it into a bad thing. Unbelievable. It's sad that folks who sit here with all kinds of comforts are opposed to others striving for those same things. And suggesting that these folks would be better off with less choices... in a barter society? lol... now I remember why I got bored with this board a while back. Every rich nation started off poor like the nations I mentioned. They all had to develop and go...
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Re: College "Education" Is BS

toussaint ·
That's actually correct for the most part. We have state capitalism thanks to the regulations that are implemented by politicians under the guise of "protecting [u]name your cause[/u]". People see the problems caused by our state capitlism, and blame the free market, when it is by definition not a free market. You mean the US and EU bullying other countries with trade barriers and farm subsidies? You're pretty much correct again. All the "free trade" agreements aren't really free trade. Just...
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Re: The Spiritual Problem With Modernist Art

FireFly ·
Lots to respond to in your previous response to me. I'd prefer to break it down into chunks so I can get through it, and also not be overwhelmed by a wall of words. OK? while 'logical' minds could shake their heads in agreement with the above statement, I disagree. [I'll have to go back and study where I may have categorized you - aside from your being christian?] IF we toss the labels aside, them maybe 'we' begin to understand things. Labels and cliches become faded and jaded and not so...
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Re: New Black Conservative Website

Empty Purnata ·
What do you mean by "freer" economies? Back that rhetoric up with substance. By "Free" do you mean deregulated? (Trickle Down/Voodoo Economics) How many people in other countries have been miraculously "lifted out of poverty" by this allegedly "free" market? According to THE FACTS, free market Western economies have huge GDPs and GNPs, but low average GNIs and HDIs. Market socialist economies have smaller GNPs but larger average GNIs and HDIs. Developing countries that are part of the "free...
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Re: Changing 'black' studies for the times

James Wesley Chester ·
I don't think your reference of 'Africans in America' is the same as my reference of 'African Americans', but without belaboring that, I'm sure we will each know where our respective references are applicable. You may be right. That 'fear' may indeed be a consequence of experience in American society. African Americans are not the center of the African world, agreed. Educational programs, and systems, can reflect that African America in not the center of the African of the African World.
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Re: Feminism vs. Womanism

kresge ·
The wiki piece really should be treated as a stub because it gives a rather poor understanding of womanism as it relates to feminism, particularly in the context of Walker's text. For Walker, womanism includes feminism. She says that womanism is to feminism as purple is to lavender. Purple is the larger category to which lavender belongs. The piece also does not address the argument put forth by Patricia Hill Collins in Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of...
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Re: Puberty Rites.....

ma'am ·
Ha. I was going to post this topic this morning. I don't know any unwritten rites in Western society. I haven't had any formal ones from my family. My sister-in-law tried to pressure my mother into throwing me a quinceanera, but my mother didn't see the point of one until I turned 20. Then it was a beautiful and wonderous idea. . .Five years too late. I didn't want a sweet sixteen. I would have rathered a quince. But I didn't know that people threw real sweet sixteen parties--Not until I saw...
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Re: The Five Major African Initiation Rites

Rowe ·
The five initiation rites discusesd in this synopsis, desparately, need to be restored in our communities. Thanks for posting! I truly enjoyed reading this.
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Re: The Five Major African Initiation Rites

Rowe ·
Some points that are especially poignant: This transition to adulthood is exceedingly difficult in Western societies because there are no systems of adulthood rites to systematically guide and direct the young person through this important stage in his or her life cycle. Unfortunately, in Western societies there is no fundamental guidance or transformation from a child to an adult that is required or expected. This "leave it for chance" approach to adulthood development is the root of most...
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Re: CARNIVAL IS THE ANCIENT 'AFRICAN-KHEMET NEW YEAR"

Oshun Auset ·
Melesi, Aristotle was educated in the Egyptian mystery system. The Greek 'greats' all gave credit in their own works to where and from whom they attained their knowledge from. In fact they legitimized themslelves by associating themselves with the Egyptians. White supremacist re-writes/editing of history likes to leave that part out of what they teach in the mis-education system. They have to leave out the African origins to justify exploiting oppressing the very people they learned...
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Re: You can't help who you love

HeruStar ·
Virtue, I'll try African thought. The english language does love no justice. love 1. A deep, tender, ineffable feeling of affection and solicitude toward a person, such as that arising from kinship, recognition of attractive qualities, or a sense of underlying oneness. 2. A feeling of intense desire and attraction toward a person with whom one is disposed to make a pair; the emotion of sex and romance. This is the Western concept of love... a feeling. But LOVE is an unconditional,...
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Re: You can't help who you love

Khalliqa ·
Damn..... Peace, Virtue
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Re: Cognitive dissonance and the black woman

Rowe ·
Brother, I love u too, but the biggest pet peeve that I have is when people mistakingly label this kind of information as "wrongful" simply because it is information that is not commonly accepted by the medical profession or Western science, and for a good reason. This is the kind of information that keeps people from relying on medications and doctors for the rest of their lives. One point that we do agree on is that what I've offered thus far is definitely not medical advice, but...
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Re: Negroes?African

James Wesley Chester ·
Thanks for the ethnographic information. I occasionally wonder about 'what ethnic groups are where' across the African continent. Your point about 'African Negroes' is well taken. By the way, I was particularly pleased that you distinguished the difference of intent by using the term western Africa as opposed to 'West Africa'. While many consider terminology insignificant, 'West Africa' is the terminaology of conquerors as is evinced by 'West Berlin', 'West Germany', 'East Asia, 'North...
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Re: Race still an issue for farmers in Zimbabwe

ZAKAR ·
What is the African Nations and the indigenous nations of the world, refuse to import Western Goods and only trade with one another. What if they refused to allow their resources to be controlled by outsiders? I know the answer (Iraq,Iran)but when will the masses of african people get sick and tired of these tyrant puppits of the west and overthrow these clowns like whats going on in Central and South America. Its time for a new independence declaration for Indigenous nations
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Re: St. Jerome's Immaculate Error [Revised]

kresge ·
Mary is also a descendant of David. Also, what does the Immaculate Conception have to do with this.
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Re: Marcus Garvey Was A Colonialist

Empty Purnata ·
Marcus Garvey supported a Back-To-Africa movement which supported African-Americans moving to Africa and using Liberia as a home state. Of course, knowing the history of Liberia, this translated to establishing African-American settlements even against the will of the Native West Africans. African-American settlers into Liberia behaved very similarly to European colonialists. They displaced the natives against their will, and used Western backing to establish Western social order.
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Re: Marcus Garvey Was A Colonialist

Empty Purnata ·
http://www.solidarity-us.org/atc/84Lang.html
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Re: Albinism: The "Bleached" Uncolor {Revisee}

Kai ·
Peace.... Scientists Find A DNA Change That Accounts For White Skin By Rick WeissWashington Post Staff Writer Friday, December 16, 2005; Page A01 Scientists said yesterday that they have discovered a tiny genetic mutation that largely explains the first appearance of white skin in humans tens of thousands of years ago, a finding that helps solve one of biology's most enduring mysteries and illuminates one of humanity's greatest sources of strife. The work suggests that the skin-whitening...
 
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