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Tagged With "AFRICAN-BLACK DIASPORA"

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Re: Panjea live - HOT!

FireFly ·
What others say...and another pic... not great quality but hey I was busy dancing. "What a strange confluence of forces this Californian is. He seems to be a Western white man channelling music from deep in the heart of Africa and the Caribbean diaspora. Unlike most Western people who borrow from African traditions, such as Paul Simon, Mick Fleetwood and Ginger Baker, Berry didn't go on a snatch-and-grab mission. He went to southern Africa in 1990, stayed for more than a decade, married a...
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Re: What's At The End of the Rainbow?

humblelynn ·
I think what we should be striving for and what we continue to strive for is reclaiming our communities and finding ways to make sure our youths aren't statistics. I don't believe that the truth myth of the American Dream exist for most Americans, and it has never existed for African Americans. Black Millionaires still cannot conquer the sickness of white supremacy, and as long as white supremacy exist, the American Dream cannot be and has never been a reality. As opposed to chasing after...
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Re: Black Unity: Moving Beyond The RHETORIC

Nmaginate ·
I don't agree with that and the term "UNITY" gets more vague with every use. Dis-unity would seem to be a function of our situation. So, I see that idea as one suggesting False Causation. The central question is: How do African Americans create a "unity paradigm" that works for the highly stratified "black diaspora?" To merely say "We are not unified and that's what causes or allows our problems to continue" doesn't answer the important question here. Neither does it say what Unity Is and...
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Re: Black Unity: Moving Beyond The RHETORIC

James Wesley Chester ·
How do African Americans create a "unity paradigm" that works for the highly stratified "black diaspora?"---Nmaginate The group I am referencing is that group that is of unknown African ancestry. That group may be expanded to include any other person of African ancestry who a citizen of, or resident in, the United States. And I guess I should add all those involved should be speaking to the best needs for African America, as indicated in your initial phrase of the quote. Having said that...
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Re: Black Unity: Moving Beyond The RHETORIC

sunnubian ·
_____________________________________________ ______________________________________________ I couldn't agree more, but then that brings us back to that 'unity' thing, wherein the whole of African America (preferable under the umbrella of your African American Congress of sorts) has to come together (unity) to vote, build political bases, raise the funds that it would take to challange the present laws, discriminate sentencing laws, abuses of power, wrongful convictions, unconstitutional...
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Re: Reparations v. Eliminating Race Specific Claims

ricardomath ·
Well, I don't really know too much about the Law 70, except that I see references to it in various articles from time to time. It's the law that outlines Afrocolombian ancestrial territorial rights in Colombia. Of course, getting a law on the books and getting the law implimented are two different things, especially in Colombia. In my "Blacks in Colombia" thread in the "African Diaspora" folder there are several articles about Law 70. Here's a search page for the articles in that thread that...
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Re: Reparations v. Eliminating Race Specific Claims

ricardomath ·
Well, if you read the articles in my "Blacks in Colombia" thread, then you probably know about as much about it as I do. It looks like several millions of acres have been claimed under the law, but that for the most part, the law exists mainly on paper, because of the war going on. Even having collective title to land may not mean much if you find yourself displaced by paramilitaries or guerillas. Colombia has the largest number of internally displaced persons (IDPs) of any country in...
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Re: The Best Environment for the Development of Our Potential....

James Wesley Chester ·
I believe that respect will nost greatly enhanced when we recognize ourselves, we Americans of unknown African ancestry, as the ethncity we are, and the ancestral nationality we have. African America. PEACE Jim Chester
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Re: The Best Environment for the Development of Our Potential....

ZAKAR ·
No we shouldnt impose ourselves anywere, but we should begin to travel abroad study abroad , especially in Africa.I have many friends from all over the continent of Africa and the biggest problem between us is propaganda. Most brothers and sistas i know from the continent, deep down have a lot a of for africans in america and the diaspora. Once we begin to dig up our history , study who we are relate to our own the walls of ignorance will crumble. We are an african people you can hyphenate...
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Re: The Best Environment for the Development of Our Potential....

James Wesley Chester ·
I see your point. A major result of reestablishing our ancestral nationality will be parity status as a participating member in Pan-Africanism. We simply 'unclaimed orphans' participating simply because we are 'black'. That is an insult to ourselves. Reesstablishing our relationship with the nations of Africa must, not should, be as a freestanding ethnicity unique in our own right. African American. PEACE Jim Chester
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Re: African immigrants face bias from blacks

ZAKAR ·
Propaganda anyone who as actually connected to africans from the continent,I mean really extended and olive branch knows the deep affection africans have for us and visa versa, its just those self hating ignorant brothers and sistas on both sides that perpetuate this myth. Africans in America has always looked to the Continent as our homeland.Africans on the continent have always looked at Africans in the diaspora as their brothers and sistas that were taken from their homeland to the new...
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Re: Changing 'black' studies for the times

ZAKAR ·
let be real, Africans in America are but a small part of the African diaspora, until we look at it in a more globally context we will never be able to address our needs. There is nothing wrong with a Pan African approach to African Studies, just because it takes africans in america out of center stage doesnt mean we will be forgotten, no matter how you put it Africans in america play a pivital role in the over all develpment of african studies\but so does the carribean, central and sout...
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Re: The Best Environment for the Development of Our Potential....

ZAKAR ·
when i said africans in america, i was being specfic to those of us in the united state, the diaspora also includes the US , i should have said the rest of the diaspora.I dont believe we are ethnically different, we just dont know who we are.like malcom said, "a cat can have kittens in a oven, it doesnt make the m biscuits" I just think we have so much more in common that differences. I think, even in our ignorance, we are more african than we will ever be american.when we were on the...
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Re: Changing 'black' studies for the times

James Wesley Chester ·
Re: Changing 'black' studies for the times
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Re: African immigrants face bias from blacks

Oshun Auset ·
Re: African immigrants face bias from blacks
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Re: Changing 'black' studies for the times

Oshun Auset ·
Re: Changing 'black' studies for the times
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Re: Changing 'black' studies for the times

Oshun Auset ·
I don't want to be rude to an elder, but the posts that I read from you as of late JWC show a level of ignorance and self hate I didn't know you had. You really have displayed a repulsive us/them mentality when it comes to the African diaspora. Divide and conquor goes beyond the plantation. Are you even concerned about our liberation? I'm one of those Africans born in Amerikkka that also fits the description of the 'they' you referred to... I hope you aren't suggesting that because I don't...
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Re: Changing 'black' studies for the times

James Wesley Chester ·
I don't think your reference of 'Africans in America' is the same as my reference of 'African Americans', but without belaboring that, I'm sure we will each know where our respective references are applicable. You may be right. That 'fear' may indeed be a consequence of experience in American society. African Americans are not the center of the African world, agreed. Educational programs, and systems, can reflect that African America in not the center of the African of the African World.
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Re: Changing 'black' studies for the times

Yemaya ·
From what I've seen most schools that offer African-American studies, tie it in with African studies. Medgar Evers College offers a degree in Caribbean studies, the only time I've ever seen it. They don't ironically offer a degree in African/African American studies. However, I believe that the courses should include all places where Africans were brought to be enslaved and the history of African nations and kingdoms. One should know each others history and culture in the African Diaspora.
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Re: African immigrants face bias from blacks

BanjiGirl ·
Its basically due to ignorance. Black Americans have been so disconnected from Africa and what we were taught was basically negative. For example we were taught that Africa was a primitive backwards lands of voodoo-worshiping heathens and we should be "glad" that the benevolent white Christian slavemasters rescued our behinds from such a backwards heathenish place. Africa is still considered backwards and it's people mired in ignorance. And of course we were told that African physical...
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Re: African immigrants face bias from blacks

TruEssence ·
I totally agree with you Zakar. Africans are my brothas and sisthas. I have gotten nothing but love from my African brothas and sistahs. It is very sad that situations like what was posted happens. But they do happen ignorance is a deadly thing.
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Re: Changing 'black' studies for the times

Oshun Auset ·
I'll do a furhter expose on that subject later(I'm short on time), but the attack on another thread stating something like the idea that you don't have an urge to reunite with 'those wo sold you' while you simultaneousely don't seem to have a problem being in a land controlled in every way by those who 'bought and exploited and continue to exploit and oppress us' is an example. I couldn't give a damn who likes me either, especially over the internet. The ending(or minimization of) systematic...
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Re: Garífunas sign accord with new Honduras president

James Wesley Chester ·
Back on May 26, 2005, when he was initiating his political campaign, Zelaya signed an accord with Afro Hondurans. He promised that, if he won the presidency with their support, he would make every effort to see that their concerns are addressed.---Oshun Auset This is good news for another member-group of The African Diaspora. I continue to contend that such internal alliance, dare I say 'organization', will have a similar levering effect in the U.S. The African American National Committee,...
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Re: Marcus Garvey Was A Colonialist

Empty Purnata ·
Marcus Garvey supported a Back-To-Africa movement which supported African-Americans moving to Africa and using Liberia as a home state. Of course, knowing the history of Liberia, this translated to establishing African-American settlements even against the will of the Native West Africans. African-American settlers into Liberia behaved very similarly to European colonialists. They displaced the natives against their will, and used Western backing to establish Western social order.
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Re: Marcus Garvey Was A Colonialist

ZAKAR ·
To mix Marcus Garvey's Pan African Approach to Afircan with the Ex African slaves who resettled Liberia as Colonialist is mixing apples and oranges. Marcus Garvey was in no way connected to the Liberia movement and he spoke of Liberia simpy because of the Diasporan connection but he was talking about the whole continent of Africa uniting as well as the Diaspora reconnecting to the motherland spiritually and in cases where people choose to repatriate physical. Whomever tried to tie Marcus...
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Re: Marcus Garvey Was A Colonialist

Empty Purnata ·
Did you know that he also supported Imperial Japan? Japan was conducting a massive imperial campaign to conquer the rest of Asia and he supported them in what they were doing. It's even admitted by historians (even ones sympathetic) that he borrowed some views from European colonialism and racialism. What about his whole "new African elite" thing? What do you think that meant?
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Re: Ghana reaches out to Chicago Heights

ZAKAR ·
what is there to be skeptical about? Spending a little money in West African can only help us as a people. So what if Ghana wants to take advantage of its history to draw africans in the Diaspora home, its a good thing. As of right now we spend virtual every dime we make with non black people, so giving lets say 10% to Ghana or other African countries is a drop in the bucket to what we give Prada, Cadilac,Polo, Nike etc
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Re: College "Education" Is BS

Shango67 ·
I have read your thoughts about a Black state and of course, I think your outline is a great plan. However, Africans managing an entire state in this country will come with a cost. What I am saying is... Haiti, the first, only liberated and free African state / country in the western hemisphere is suffering, IMO, beause their ancestors kicked french ass all over Hispanola. Yes, I do think white folks have long term memory, especially in the case of the Haitian people. The ramifications of a...
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Re: WHERE DO YOU STAND?

ZAKAR ·
you act like we can just up and all just leave right now, Im certainly not talking about that .What i am talking about is beginning the connection with other African people as well as brothers and sistas on the continent. Form bridges start organizations, international businesses. Everyone is not gonna leave america, probably most wont at least at the moment, but some have and more will, we can use this to build on expand out options and eventually with enough investment, exchanges and when...
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Re: WHERE DO YOU STAND?

ZAKAR ·
see the problem is you turn the dime on me and put me in a situation where I have to answer all the questions you ask, but you answer nothing, just sit back read what i write then pick at my statements. What do you feel, how do you believe we ensure the survivial of African people. If you have read many of my post I have articulated how I feel about what needs to be done for African people to ensure their survival. You make some very audicious and offensive comments, don't be surprised when...
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Re: Is Pan-Africanism Truly Possible or Even Logical?

Jabbar ·
two thoughts one Pan-Africanism could come to be in two different manners. One would be to unite "religions" and "belief systems" and all come together to be one happy family. The other would be more like a business agreement, where we do not necissarily have to come to one accord instantly or even at all. two I think one thing that does seem to be true to me, it could be a misconception, is that Africans can be satisfied with life without feeling like everyone on earth agrees with them and...
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Re: Is Pan-Africanism Truly Possible or Even Logical?

James Wesley Chester ·
---HonestBrother And...since 'Pan-Africanism' begins 'at home', why isn't that clear. What is 'unclear' about African American identity? Shouldn't 'Pan-Africansim' be more than simply 'black'. Maybe 'Pan-Africanism' cannot be more than simply 'black' Considering that when 'UppityNegress' listed locations of the African Diaspora, she omitted all the nations of Europe, questions of such identity exist for others as well. And then there is the issue of who constitutes the African Diaspora. The...
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Re: Is Pan-Africanism Truly Possible or Even Logical?

ZAKAR ·
well there were many africans from America, as well as the rest of the Diaspora, of course WEB was instrumental and I might add one of the foremost panafricanist of his time, as well as CLR James, George Patmore, JA Rogers, Malcom X was a Panafricanist in his own right as well as Marcus Garvey, the Great John Henrike Clark, Dr. Ben, Wade Nobels, AS well as cats like Dr Amos Wilson and so on, I dont know if WEB was Nkrumas mentor, but i do know while at Lincoln University and a part of the...
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Re: Nationalism VS Assimilation

ZAKAR ·
January 24, 1965. Malcolm X Speaks at OAAU Rally on Afro-American History. Listen to this Speech its on Malcolm x: A Research site. I'm a Black Nationalist, in the Tradition of Malcolm, Nkrumah, Seku Ture, Patrice Lumumba, CLR James, and George Patmore and of course John Henrike Clarke Amos Wilson among others. I believe in African peoples uniting institutionally all around the world. I believe there can be no liberation for an African anywhere if the African Continent isn't free. I believe...
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Re: Nationalism VS Assimilation

ZAKAR ·
did you guys read what i said, how you gonna say some bullshyt like that, Of course i know White Supremacy is Global, thats why i said what i said, so you assimilationist dont believe we can connect with the rest of African people? there is no way to build upon the Nationalist Pan African Movement so many have participated in since we have been here? They wasnt successful? I would say they were successful, they just didnt sustain. People sold out the masses on the Continent just like they...
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Re: Black Folks: It is Time to Lay Down the Mantle

Rowe ·
Black people are not merely interested in the securing the rights of immigrants when we hold the mantle of social injustice. And making such a statement demonstrates a severely limited understanding of the fight against global injustice. Black people hold this mantle because we know that combating WHITE SUPREMACY is a 24-hr., 365-day respoonsibility. Black people in America and throughout the diaspora would probably love just for ONE day to not have to think about combating social injustice.
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Re: Black Folks: It is Time to Lay Down the Mantle

HonestBrother ·
I will add that if we lay down this mantle, things will simply get worse for everyone (us included) a lot faster...
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Re: Black Folks: It is Time to Lay Down the Mantle

Black Viking ·
Re: Black Folks: It is Time to Lay Down the Mantle
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Re: Black Nationalism 2006

Shango67 ·
Haiti is in the condition it is primarily due to the weakness of Africans throughout the Diaspora and its lack of connection to Africa. Black folks, everywhere, are the only people without a foreign or domestic policy.
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Re: Black Nationalism 2006

tmonster ·
Clarity
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Re: Black Nationalism 2006

Shango67 ·
I am sorry...do you need clarity on Haiti or our lack of foreign policy - or both?
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Re: Black Nationalism 2006

tmonster ·
Neither, I was trying to say that your reply is filled with clarity
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Re: Black Nationalism 2006

ZAKAR ·
I believe the consciousness of Black nationalism is growing maturing and manifesting itself in a variety of ways. I see more and more organizations forming with its members representing the complete African Diaspora. I see more and more people connecting the global problem of white supremacy to the local conditions of the African Diaspora. I see more and more brothers and sistas marrying across intercultural boundaries. The movement may have become stagnated in the aspect of fist pumping...
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Re: Black Nationalism 2006

James Wesley Chester ·
But the complex work of weaving the experiences of the various areas of the African Diaspora is growing.---ZAKAR I don't see that as really being 'nationalism'. Amalgation, or assimilation, yes. I see that also to a lesser estent, because of the smaller (African-descendant) population in which we live. PEACE Jim Chester PEACE
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Re: Pan Africanism 2006

umbrarchist ·
How is Pan-Africanism different from Black Nationalism? I tend to dislike the term Nationalism because the very nature of the spread of the Black diaspora has put us in different nations created by other people. Most of the Black nations in Africa had their borders defined by Whites. So though I consider the terms somewhat equivalent I would lean toward Pan-Africanism. Also I think technology makes nations obsolete. I have visited a board in Pakistan and left messages. I am communicating...
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Re: Pan Africanism 2006

ZAKAR ·
I believe the consciousness of Pan Africanism is growing maturing and manifesting itself in a variety of ways. I see more and more organizations forming with its members representing the complete African Diaspora. I see more and more people connecting the global problem of white supremacy to the local conditions of the African Diaspora. I see more and more brothers and sistas marrying across intercultural boundaries. The movement may have become stagnated in the aspect of fist pumping slogan...
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Re: Pan Africanism 2006

Shango67 ·
Of course, Africans throughout the Diaspora do not share ALL of the same values, codes, or moral principles. As this conversation continues, maybe we should spend some time, if possible, agreeing to terms and definitions because as it stands, I need to know exactly how you would define homegenous. Be that as it may, I would argue that pure homogeneity is not needed throughout the African collective for Pan Africanism to be realized. That is to say, an agenda could be practical once we begin...
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Re: So Pan-Africanism/Black nationalism establishes a solid foundation circa 2010...

ZAKAR ·
That comes after you do the real work.Organizing a United Africa, an United Diaspora, I believe once you get our people organized and focused everything else is easy. If Africans come together and unite anything is possible.Im not an advocate of Nukes but how does everyone else get them. the Technology is already out there and as the years go by the material will be easier and easier to get it. THe short answer is after we do the serious work , nations will simply purchase the technology...
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Re: So Pan-Africanism/Black nationalism establishes a solid foundation circa 2010...

ZAKAR ·
PanAfrica: 'Greater Africa' Has Changed the World Too Email This Page Print This Page The East African Standard (Nairobi) COLUMN April 16, 2006 Posted to the web April 17, 2006 Ali Mazrui Nairobi Two trends relevant to the African people have been under way since the second half of the 20th Century: globalisation of Africa and hegemonisation of the United States. Africa and the people of African descent have become more of a global presence. And the US has become more of a hegemony: Empire...
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Re: So Pan-Africanism/Black nationalism establishes a solid foundation circa 2010...

ZAKAR ·
I thought it was good article, it speaks on the relationship of the African Diaspora and its affect on the Globalization of the continent. Im not trying to convince anyone to be more Pan African or not. I live it. So as individuals criticize the movement and its results.I as what has intergration done. What has individualism done. Its easy to critique, but to put yourself in the fire, deal with the people and build relationships its a totally different things. I know for a fact that Africans...
 
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