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Tagged With "HOW TO ERASE AFRICAN HISTORY"

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Re: DNA Used to Trace African Lineage...

MidLifeMan ·
I didn't finish his book, "Civilization or Barbarism"... but love what i did read. This may turn into something very interesting and divisive. I saw someone on a talk show who used this DNA type testing and found that eventhough he "looked" AFRICAN American his DNA said he was white.
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Re: The Black Commentator vs. The Wall Street Journal

HonestBrother ·
Maybe Constructive Feedback knows this guy?
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Re: The Black Commentator vs. The Wall Street Journal

James Wesley Chester ·
The hell with the Wall Street Journal. I think Blackcommentator has a problem with African America. If you disagree, with their opinion, you are cancelled. PEACE Jim Chester
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Re: The Black Commentator vs. The Wall Street Journal

Faheem ·
This has to be the best op-ed I have read all year, albeit it is only the 13th of January. Brother Bruce articulates all that was running through my mind as I was reading white folk commenting about Black folk on a white Blog this morning in regards to a report that was published in Seattle's paper yesterday about the difference in length and how often Black students are suspended and disciplined in School in relations to white students. The garbage that was coming out of these white folk...
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Re: The Black Commentator vs. The Wall Street Journal

Nmaginate ·
And, since highlighted, African-American views then are, in Taranto's view, illegitimate or rather can only be legitimated when and if White people (a substantial minority of them, at least) hold the same views/perspectives or otherwise agree with so-called "appeals" from Black Folk. Racist Arrogance or no, it is the very imposition of and/or insistence on WHITE SUPREMACY. White Views RULE. They are the norm, the standard bearer - The Measuring Stick. Or so it is implied. I really don't...
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Re: Now Speaking of an Endless Loop Cycle of Poverty, Heavy Dependence on Social Welfare

Michael ·
I've lived in predominate Black communities, such as Oakland, Detroit, Baltimore, Compton, Watts, and South Central Los Angeles (when it was predominately Black), the working class community of Inglewood, West of La Brea when it was predominately Caucasian, stayed with a Canadian Caucasian farm family during my youth while with other family members, an integrated community such as West Adams where I continue to live until this day...... .......to which in every instance the predominately...
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Re: Impeach Bush?

Michael ·
...More likely the Democratic Party is losing steam, in trouble, losing its following, etc., etc. " Democrats target Alito, but miss the mark January 12, 2006 BY ROBERT NOVAK SUN-TIMES COLUMNIST Edward M. Kennedy, the 73-year-old liberal lion of the Senate, did not so much roar as huff and puff Tuesday, as he faced Judge Samuel Alito. He and other Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee who had spent weeks preparing for Alito's Supreme Court confirmation hearing seemed to be shooting...
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Re: Question for Kresge?

FireFly ·
hello Rowe, thanks for contributing. Yes, I agree with your comments immediately above. As it is I have always had a few 'issues' with Christianity and some of its concepts even though I was raised as a christian in my family but we 'won't go there'. I'm sure it's obvious I have a very limited education of world religions, and have been slowly reading up about all the 'alternatives'. I still find flaws but to date, the closest religion I find favour with has been Hinduism. African religions...
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Re: Impeach Bush?

Michael ·
...More likely the Democratic Party is losing steam, in trouble, losing its following, etc., etc. " Democrats target Alito, but miss the mark January 12, 2006 BY ROBERT NOVAK SUN-TIMES COLUMNIST Edward M. Kennedy, the 73-year-old liberal lion of the Senate, did not so much roar as huff and puff Tuesday, as he faced Judge Samuel Alito. He and other Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee who had spent weeks preparing for Alito's Supreme Court confirmation hearing seemed to be shooting...
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Re: What's At The End of the Rainbow?

HonestBrother ·
I don't believe in the American Dream. I'm with Umbra in that my goal personally is to achieve economic stability. This is * achievable * . The American Dream - to the extent that 'equality' requires acceptance - is not. Any kind of leverage will only come from $$$-power . We can demonstrate how moral, how intellectually brilliant, trustworthy, and capable we are until we're blue in the face. Hardcore whitey will still demand more proof. So that by no means should be the goal.
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Re: Question for Kresge?

Rowe ·
This topic is of great interest to me as well. However, because of the diversity of African cultures, and its widespread aspects, I reject the simplistic use of attributive terms such as "ancestor worship," "fetishism," and "animism" as definitions of African religion. Even among converts to Islam or Christianity, you will find elements of traditional African spirituality. In the Hebrew Bible, for example, animal sacrifices are common, rituals are performed, polygamy is an acceptable form of...
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Re: Vouchers ???

Nmaginate ·
I don't think either JWC or SweetWuzzy quite got Nmag's clear point. With all the anti-school desegregation machinations where Whites tried to get government funding for their private schools... I'm like trying to see how come that RACIST history is ignored or forgotten. To answer Sweet... The intention is for Whites to obtain government subsidies for their private school perogatives. The problem and even the reason for concern over integration is how it is an American Social/Political Fact...
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Re: Vouchers ???

Empty Purnata ·
Now there is no debating that. Anyone who tries to deny the fact that "school vouchers" have a racist past, and most likely a racist modern-day intent, have their heads buried in the ground. Of course, many White racists will deny it to the end, and their Black-faced, chicken-eating, greasy-grinnin', coon-shuffling lackies will follow them to the ends of the Earth and beyond.
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Re: Racism Out Of "Racism-Deniers"

Empty Purnata ·
But, I have a few theories on who and what CON-Feed is (and he's not the only one here like himself, Michael Lofton doesn't count, he's a Spambot): 1) A CONSERVATIVE WHITE GUY WHO VIEWS BLACK PEOPLE AS BEING "BENEATH HIM" COMING HERE TO SPAM THE SITE WITH TRIPE (WHILE PRETENDING TO BE BLACK) THINKING HE CAN GET US TO BREAK DOWN AND ACT ALL "NIGGERISH" SO HE CAN GET A GOOD LAUGH. 2) An extremely sheltered Black man who grew up in a middle-class/rich home by Black Middleclass parents who told...
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Re: Racism Out Of "Racism-Deniers"

Isome ·
You mean minimizers/deniers who say things like "thug culture" in comparison with the racism in America is worse for the Black community at large -- as if "thug culture" is a concept born, bred and thriving only among people of African descent, regardless of economic status or educational background, and without any external influences that nurture it? ...those kind of mindless, malevolent, deconstructive minimizers/deniers... that's what is being referred to, right?!
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Re: Appreciating Black Beauty

Rowe ·
I'm a beautiful sister, however, this is a photo taken from the collection of African models that I keep on my computer. For what its worth, my astrological sign is "Libra," and librans are known to have a strong appreciation for beauty.
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Re: Appreciating Black Beauty

Rowe ·
Sudanese Beauty, Clara Benjamin, by way of London. Clara is a top model who has appeared in Vogue, and many haute couture fashion shows. She is the most sought after for her full pouty lips and distinctive African features.
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Re: Education: then and now, Thomas Sowell

Constructive Feedback (Guest) ·
As I told my frat brother who encouraged me to join "N'Cobra" - I would consider joining BUT since he told me that they have a dual approach - REPARATION FROM AMERICA FOR SLAVERY and THE PROCESS FOR INTERNAL REPAIR WITHIN BLACK AMERICA. I told him that I would BE MORE FOCUSED ON THE INTERNAL REPAIR PROCESS. I would never do anything to stand in the way of the receipt of resources from America in the name of "Reparations" but this seems to me to be very much so less important toward acheiving...
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Re: Education: then and now, Thomas Sowell

Rowe ·
This statement is incorrect. According to research studies, most students who apply (and are accepted) into teacher education programs are White females. In fact, school systems across the country have and still are reporting a shortage in Black and Latino teachers, particularly Black male teachers. In response to this shortage, school systems have partnered with teacher education programs across the country in an effort to recruit more minority teachers. Please refer to the thread " Are...
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Re: What's At The End of the Rainbow?

Sandye ·
IMHO, we should be striving to become a unified, self-sufficient African American community. We should encourage and support small individuals who have the potential to be the next Donald Trump or Bill Gates. We should establish more of our own banks, improve our urban "blight", develop business and professional incubators to enable us to decrease our dependency on those who seek our demise rather than our growth. Education is certainly key to self-sufficiency and we should strive to...
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Re: What's At The End of the Rainbow?

James Wesley Chester ·
We, Americans who are African American, should aspire to a place and role of parity in American society. That place will enable us, as a people, to (finally) have equal protection under the law. That place would have our ancestral nationality to be recognized as an integral party our society. That place would enable us to function as individuals as every other individual in our society. PEACE Jim Chester
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Re: The 'Promised Land': Why We're Still Waiting

Constructive Feedback (Guest) ·
I am proud of Black Commentator. They made it to the second paragraph before they went on the attack. CONTENT OF THEIR CHARACTER - huh? Many who are involved in what THEY call "Civil Rights circa 2006" want everything BUT character to be the primary factor in JUDGEMENT. We have no "civil rights movement" today. We have an IDEOLOGICALLY based agenda" that seeks to use countervailing forces of racial categorization to achieve a certain result. Of course as long as YOU agree with their methods...
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Re: Education: then and now, Thomas Sowell

HonestBrother ·
My purpose was * NOT * to establish a dichotomy that encapsulated all the options in front of African Americans. As I agree that there are many other more urgent matters. I was * Only * addressing the single issue of reparations. And thank you for answering my question: In regards to the issue of reparations, you're really NOT serious. Forgetting already? : Reading for COMPREHENSION is fundamental.
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Re: Who Should Pay for Reparations? Black Americans... Obviously

James Wesley Chester ·
We, as black Americans, owe reparations for slavery.---Mike Green What a warped interpretation to put into the discussion. It is a betrayal of the best interests of African America. He will be rewarded well, and probably already is. And...it is willful. A boat-load of people, Project 21, who do 'Charlie's Job'. PEACE Jim Chester
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Re: Racism Out Of "Racism-Deniers"

Empty Purnata ·
Exactly!
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Re: What's At The End of the Rainbow?

humblelynn ·
I think what we should be striving for and what we continue to strive for is reclaiming our communities and finding ways to make sure our youths aren't statistics. I don't believe that the truth myth of the American Dream exist for most Americans, and it has never existed for African Americans. Black Millionaires still cannot conquer the sickness of white supremacy, and as long as white supremacy exist, the American Dream cannot be and has never been a reality. As opposed to chasing after...
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Re: The 'Promised Land': Why We're Still Waiting

FireFly ·
fair enough - I just took that if something had 'halted' then whatever it was had already begun. Keep in mind I have zilch experience and knowledge of a lot of US politics - local and national - just a rough 'outline', so things like Affirmative Action, or when Clinton asked in 1997 'to begin a great national conversation on race and conciliation' that I have a limited view - limited to access on information, limited in viewpoint as an outsider, and a white outsider to boot. I have to ask a...
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Re: A Declaration of Unity and Vested Interest in America

James Wesley Chester ·
No, I didn't write it. But does kinda look like 'my stuff'. Right? Out of curiosity, and with it being the MLK Holiday, I thought I would post this piece without credits. This piece is the seminal resolution of the Free African Society Convention of 1817 held in Philadelphia at Bethel A.M.E. Church. The convention and its resulting resolution was in repudiation of the American Colonization Movement to deport African American-Americans. It is the seminal document to the foundation of African...
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Re: The 'Promised Land': Why We're Still Waiting

James Wesley Chester ·
"Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity."---King I like that. It should be on a wall someplace, or used in the opening of every African American church. After all, that is the place we be found in numbers on a frequent and regular basis. I have used 'invincible ignorance' for years as an unknowing substitute for 'conscious stupidity'. This strikes me as another way to say the controversial words, 'We are our own worst enemy.' We refuse to...
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Re: Racism Out Of "Racism-Deniers"

Kweli4Real ·
In a recent departmental "Team-Building" exercise, we were asked to articulate our "Civil Rights Dream." Everyone gave the pat "I dream of the day when all people are treated fairly, with dignity and respect" or "I dream for the day when there is no longer a need for our department." And, everyone's head was bobbing, "Yep, Yep." Well, at least until they got to me, the only Black male in the division [well, there's one other, but he racially identifies with his white italian mother rather...
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Re: House of Representative is like a Plantation...

James Wesley Chester ·
I am noting that once again Ms Clinton is reaching 'into African American-related heritage to make her point. Like 'It Takes a Village...' I also don't think her analogy is terribly far off the mark, if at all. Washington, D.C. itself is, in fact, constructed on the plantation model. The city is a separate political entity controlled entirely at the discretion of the U.S. Congress, without active representation in the business of the nation. In its original construction, the residents...
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Re: House of Representative is like a Plantation...

James Wesley Chester ·
Re: House of Representative is like a Plantation...
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Re: The 'Promised Land': Why We're Still Waiting

FireFly ·
My question is do the general public white Americans take the opportunity to ask questions about race of any kind? This may not be 'dialog' but it's a way to begin to find out how other people think. To ask what's it like to be black is a valid question for someone who isn't. It's an attempt to understand another viewpoint. It's a start... not a whole conversation. I do understand the above. I see there being two sides to the process. Clarifying one's own beliefs certainly. And having the...
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Re: Vouchers ???

James Wesley Chester ·
I guarantee you that black children will suffer the most from the voucher system. Keep in mind that private schools can be very selective when it comes to admissions. They DON'T have to take any and all comers. If a child tries to gain entry from a low performing school and brings with him/her a discipline record as long as a cafeteria table, do you actually believe they will allow said student to walk their hallowed halls?? Nope.---DogBreath Rather than 'naysay' the thing, why not take the...
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Re: The 'Promised Land': Why We're Still Waiting

Nmaginate ·
Ummm... No, obviously, you don't. And this is exactly why: "I see there being two sides to the process." I'm going to be crude because you're working under the false assumption that Black people need to know something about White people. That's a rather curious idea especially when you say: Very few white people ever think about 'being white' and what that means... white privilege. Hmmm... Black people know White Privilege. What is it you think Black people stand to learn about White people...
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Re: The 'Promised Land': Why We're Still Waiting

FireFly ·
Only helping white people begin the as you call it "truth-telling". The only thing I "want white people to get out of the dialog" is to listen to and understand what is needed for equal rights, equal opportunities for all people on the planet. In this instance I am talking about African Americans and white North Americans. What do I want black people and white people to "get out of it"? An end the imbalance of "white priviledge" to create a truly inclusive human race. You keep telling me...
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Re: The 'Promised Land': Why We're Still Waiting

Nmaginate ·
A straight line is always the direct route. Why the detour? Why would White people need to know "What It's Like To Be Black"... why would they need to "listen" to anything like that when you say the object is to End White Privilege? A straight line... Very few white people ever think about 'being white' and what that means... white privilege. Okay. Why isn't White Privilege - i.e. White people taking it upon themselves to examine White Privilege - an INTRAracial Dialog you're trying to seek?
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Re: The 'Promised Land': Why We're Still Waiting

James Wesley Chester ·
I almost hate to add to this already clear issue. Almost. Without simple cynicism, there is nothing to be gained by engaging in discussion to 'educate' European-Americans, or European America. Both are 'consciously ignorant', as in invincibly ignorant. We do not owe such an effort to either African America, or America herself. That ignorance, of the European American, is a cultured, and treasured perspective that successfully resisted all efforts to effect change. That 'promised land' is not...
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Re: Expanding on MBMs Inquiry ...

James Wesley Chester ·
Malcolm X. His evolution was most directed toward a parity position for African Americans in our society. PEACE Jim Chester
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Re: The 'Promised Land': Why We're Still Waiting

Nmaginate ·
Well, ART_GURL, with JWC weighing in as EVERYONE (other than me) *lol*... It would seem that, in all your questions, with all the answers you're "looking" for, with all the answers you've gotten... Well, it's clear that you're just not listening. So, AG? Are you listening? You have been given information, rather freely I might add, about "what is needed for equal rights, equal opportunities..." But somehow, because of some pre-set idea you know you have ("two sides")... you're just not...
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Re: Vouchers ???

DogBreath ·
Rather than 'naysay' the thing, why not take the constructive route? With an assured tuition, enterprising African American-American now have a viable opportunity to create a school(s) for their own children in a construction they approve, and pay for. PEace Jim Chester[/QUOTE] That sounds good in theory....for real....it does. But do you actually believe that the powers that be would allow black folk to form their own institutions with taxpayer dollars?? Shucks, some are still complaining...
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Re: MBM: WHERE'S THE UNIFICATION?

MBM ·
As I've said many times over, there are thousands of African Americans who are 'doing their thing' in this country - achieving at the highest levels and acting in a way that is unencumbered by the ills that you are fixated on. It's a shame that this part of our community is apparently out of your view.
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Re: I finally found the Black women's reply to the "Where is the love?'" from Tampa

RadioRaheem ·
EVEN MORE!! http://www.sptimes.com/2004/10/02/Floridian/More_responses_to__Do.shtml More responses to "Do Black Men Still Want Us?" Spirited comments about romantic options and worries Letters to the Editor Published October 2, 2004 Where is the love? A magazine asks whether black men still desire black women. Eight men offer their answers. Black women speak out Earlier this week, African-American men answered women's question "Do Black Men Still Want Us?' Now women discuss their romantic...
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Re: I finally found the Black women's reply to the "Where is the love?'" from Tampa

RadioRaheem ·
My take on Part One:...in bold When elementary school teacher Patti Hairston picked up Monday's edition of the St. Petersburg Times, she braced herself. "I knew there would be negative things said about black women by black men," she said. very interesting, esp. since the writer of the original article was merely seeking the 'other side' of the Essence article. Lori Chung, 28, associate TV news producer, single, Brooklyn Personally, I don't feel the love from black men to black women and...
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Re: The Word ["Amen"]

Fine ·
How many would still say amen at the end of prayers if they knew the word is of/from the "african" God "Aten" "Aton".
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Re: MBM: WHERE'S THE UNIFICATION?

Rowe ·
Odd thing is, this fool has four degrees, one of them, a bachelor's degree in African Studies of all subjects! So you can imagine how shocked I was after hearing his views about African-Americans. You would think that someone having his educational background would be better informed about African History. Not surprsingly, his attitude about African-Americans is example of how some people can become once they have disassociated themselves from certain elements of society. Disgraceful.
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Re: MBM: WHERE'S THE UNIFICATION?

AudioGuy ·
With him, I think the emphasis was on bachelor and not the studies part... Your story remeinded me af a kid from Jamaica that was interning where I worked... We were engaged in converstion about something and he said that African Americans were lazy & Jamaicans are hard working... I stopped him in mid sentence and said: "what about all those unemployed MF's that are in Jamaica that sit around and wait for ships to come in so they can beg the tourists for money? You trying to tell me that...
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Re: MBM: WHERE'S THE UNIFICATION?

Rowe ·
Why do people insist on judging others based upon stereotypes? Nice come back!
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Re: MBM: WHERE'S THE UNIFICATION?

Rowe ·
CF, why is it okay for you to make constant racial comparisons between the accomplishments of African-Americans and other minorities, but it's not okay for others to do the same? I notice that you will only accept racial comparisons when it supports your argument. If you're going to measure the achievements of Blacks against the achievements of others, then expect for people to become defensive and do the same.
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Re: 4 Unpopular "TRUTHS"... by Project 2019

MBM ·
Could YOU? What are YOUR ideas? What has your ideology offered as a strategy to advance African America? What barometer can we look to to see the progress and RESULTS that have come from your way of thinking? Ad infinitem I have demonstrated that liberalism has fought against conservatism every step of the way to bring us from slavery to where we are today. At EVERY step along the way conservatism has fought to restrain and suppress our progress. How can you regurgitate your drivel with a...
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