Tagged With "African Origin of Mathematics"

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Re: Black Middle Class vs. American Middle Class

Nmaginate ·
Constructive Feedback?? Sunnubian?? Comments on the actual question at hand? And that set of questions make up one whole question to the tune of the one quoted, in bold, above. Now, with Asian-Americans "making more income" than any other group and excelling in education... YOUR ANSWERS? As for these blanket statements:So please make sure you are comparing Like Sets in every demographical sense. And even with that... YOUR ANSWERS?
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Re: Law, Morality, and Christians

Melesi ·
EP, Yes, John Locke and the idea of universal rights is very European, though they did not spring full-grown from the head of the French Revolution, especially that part of it that so quickly degenerated into the Reign of Terror and was well criticized by such as Edmund Burke, a supporter of much of the American philosophy. But this couldn't have arisen without the ground of the Christian faith. It's no wonder that the Magna Carta was forced on King John in England. It was a first step...
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Re: Negroes who defend the status quo once they've "gotten theirs"

Kevin41 ·
Affirmative Action: Who Benefits? -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Contents A Policy That Suffers an Identity Crisis Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About Affirmative Action Where Do We Go From Here? Bibliography -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- A Policy That Suffers an Identity Crisis Few social policy issues have served as a better gauge of racial and ethnic divisions among the American...
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Re: The Word ["Amen"]

Melesi ·
How many use it knowing that it means no such thing? The origin of "Amen" is "Amman," not "Amen" or Amun."
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Re: Kola Boof Speaks: Race & Beauty In America

Rowe ·
Sister Marimba Ani (1994), speaking on the collective hypocrisy exhibited by Europeans in Chapter one of her book Yurugu: An African-Centered Critique of European Thought and Behavior believes hypocrisy is a "way of life" for Europeans. She would undoubtedly agree with the explanations you and Brother Nayo have provided. Hypocrisy as a Way of Life Marimba Ani Within the nature of European culture there exists a statement of value or of "moral" behavior that has no meaning for the members of...
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Re: Pope: Embryo = "Full and complete human being"

MidLifeMan ·
My comments were more directed to what OTHERS said about the Catholic church...I didn't put you in that group to be honest. So we are limited to YOUR view of what makes a human? The question you asked was about the popes view about the embryo ...from your response I don't see how anyone can discuss this...I mean...we are talking about an embryo..which some have deemed shapeless and therefore not alive/human. Or maybe they say the "shapeless mass" that is not alive is human but dead? Are we...
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Re: The Spiritual Problem With Modernist Art

Melesi ·
art_gurl, I think we are talking at cross purposes. I am not talking about "art." You seem to be. That's fine, except that it confuses the issue, because you keep assuming that I'm talking about what you're talking about, and we are not. You draw an incorrect conclusion form a simple statement: +++++++++++++++++++++++++ I don't particularly care if they write or paint in a way easy for me to understand. +++++++++++++++++++++++++ Which you then say is about art. It isn't. Check the context...
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Re: People of Color' are All One? Latino Inmates in L.A. Don't Think So

UppityNegress ·
Am I the only annoyed by the whole "people of color" catchphrase? First, "people of color" are the majority on this plant, so why invent a catch-all term for the majority, why not the minority? Should we start refering to whites as "people lacking color" or "people of paleness"? Second, it irks me how all "people of color" are grouped together, despite extreme differences in culture, race, ethnicity, and country of origin. A Nigerian may have the same skin tone as a Dravidian, but therein is...
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Re: Mulatto Couple Produces Blonde, Blue Eyed White Child

Pace Tua ·
The results of the Human Genome Project, completed in 2003 and the HapMap project seem to contradict this statement. Some excerpts: By the Numbers: The human genome contains 3164.7 million chemical nucleotide bases (A, C, T, and G). The average gene consists of 3000 bases, but sizes vary greatly, with the largest known human gene being dystrophin at 2.4 million bases. The total number of genes is estimated at 30,000 "”much lower than previous estimates of 80,000 to 140,000 that had been...
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Re: Mulatto Couple Produces Blonde, Blue Eyed White Child

kresge ·
Great information!
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Re: DNA Used to Trace African Lineage...

msprettygirl ·
they aren't charging for the service, on their site they said they are so backed up with requests that they have had to direct people and or still directing incoming people who wish to have the test done to another organization that charges a fee but they themselves aren't charging but not taking on any new cases. truessence brung up a series on PBS that had a whole episode on this very subject. i saw the episode and it was really good. The interesting thing was henry louis gates jr.( the...
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Re: What is Egungun

Johnny Destiny ·
Hello, fellow philosophers, Let us use that part of the mind I call perception, and we shall discover the scientific facts. Quote: ________________________________________________ Dude, don't you realize that the terms "God" and "Goddess" are artifacts of the English language??? What you're saying is nonsensical. You haven't made a single legitimate ontological distinction and are dealing only in the field of semantics. ________________________________________________ Let us stick with...
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Re: What is Egungun

HonestBrother ·
Greek: Theos Latin: Deus German: Gott French: Dieu Italian: Dio Then how do you deal with the fact that Sanskrit is an Indo-European language and so has the related word devi ? A problem for you since India is in Asia....
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Re: The Rise of Fascism in America

Empty Purnata ·
At a signal from the Principal the pupils, in ordered ranks, hands to the side, face the Flag. Another signal is given; every pupil gives the flag the military salute -- right hand lifted, palm downward, to a line with the forehead and close to it. Standing thus, all repeat together, slowly, "I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands; one Nation indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all." At the words, "to my Flag," the right hand is extended gracefully, palm...
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Re: Is Pan-Africanism Truly Possible or Even Logical?

UppityNegress ·
"Africoid"....mmmm...sounds like I'm a zoologist classifying so new and elsuive animal. Sorry if the word "Negro" offended anyone. Henceforth, Negro will be replaced with "Black African" or "Subsaharan origin" in this thread. A bit off topic, but seriously, why is "Negro" so controversial?
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Re: Illegal Immigration

ricardomath ·
Half a million march against US immigration reform Demonstrators march in Los Angeles, California, to protest of proposed illegal immigration legislation. Half a million protesters paralyzed downtown Los Angeles, demanding amnesty for undocumented immigrants and rejection of a proposed law that would drastically tighten US immigration rules.(AFP/Getty Images/J. Emilio Flores) LOS ANGELES (AFP) - Half a million protesters paralyzed downtown Los Angeles, demanding amnesty for undocumented...
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Re: The Word ["Amen"]

Kai ·
Peace.... I do not think that scholars deny the connection between the proto semitic language and kemetic influences. The idea that the two are distinct is a fallacy. It is quite probable that Amen of ancient KMT is the origin of the use by the people of Shem. Shem according to the Tenahk, is the brother of Ham, according to many african scholars, including the illustrious Cheihk Anta Diop, Ham is derived from Kham, which is within the original name Khamit or KMT. If this is correct the...
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Re: The Word ["Amen"]

Kai ·
Peace.... Okay...But in this case...the root use of Amen is Kemetic. The root of anything Semitic is African. If you accept the biblical version of history then Shem(Semites) is the brother of Ham(Kam). If the two are sons of Noah, they spoke a common language. the languages are not cousins, they are brothers. Both the Tanahk, and the Gospel, are products of students out of the Egyptian mysteries...I would consider this as a Prima facie evidence. Now we can argue the validity of the Bible's...
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Re: The Word ["Amen"]

Majadi ·
I am new to this forum and find it very interesting. Something to ponder; How is it that a word of "hebrew" origin has an antiquity of at least 5,000 years, possibly to 10,000 years? How is it that the same word can be incorporated into an Afrikan country and civilization prior to the origins of the word Hebrew? We find Afrikans in the Nile Valley using the word "amen" in names of pharoahs i.e., Amen-Hotep, Amen-ophis I, II, III, and IV, Amen-kare. The question of Greece and its supposed...
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Re: The Word ["Amen"]

Fine ·
Hebrew origins is nothing more than a copy-cat echo of the "akan language" out of Ghana.... The people "now" in Ghana that speak the "akan language," once lived in Egypt and were the dominant group at that time!
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Re: The Word ["Amen"]

Melesi ·
As have I, and at no time did I ever mean a "slave" or a "worker," which the Czech word meant originally, which is why it appeared in a science-fiction work in the early Twenties and has been with us ever since. When we use the word "debonair," we don't mean someone who smells good, though that is what the word meant originally. And "malaria," no longer means "bad air," but rather a mosquito-borne disease. One who is "dextrous" is able, not "right-handed," which is what the Latin term meant.
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Re: The Word ["Amen"]

HonestBrother ·
When the French say 'Oui' they mean 'yes' but they sound (more) like they're saying 'We'... Are the words 'oui' and 'we' related in any significant way because they sound alike? The answer is NO. Note: The Norman French once conquered England. The English lived for a time under French rule and the English language still bears many obvious French influences. But this is not one of them. If you've spent a lot of time studying languages you'd realize that it's extremely easy to come up with...
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Re: Whitewashing the 10 Commandments

DogBreath ·
Well, I won't be watching it. I'm so dagum tired of Hollywood...shucks, white America trying to write black people out of biblical history. Zipporah was an Ethiopian....a Cushite woman. Nothing Spanish about that. Her father Jethro was also....well....Ethiopian. Yet, instead of getting a black woman, they went and got a Spanish one. That's a slap in the collective faces of black people. It is so sad that even many white so called "theologians" are STILL trying to write black people out of...
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Re: The Word ["Amen"]

Kai ·
Peace... Well what would you say when someone points out that the habiru or hebrews are themselves egyptians for much of their history? The Hebrew people were embedded in Egypt as we are embedded in america. this is consistent with the biblical version of history and the academic view. Of course there are differences in dialect, however, they are closely related. they are both semitic. the semitic origin of Hebrew, and the language of the people of KMT is not actually disputed in academic...
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Re: The Word ["Amen"]

HonestBrother ·
Firstly, I'm not an Africanist nor an Egyptologist.... Never claimed to be .... I'll repost the following: And I have spent a hell of a lot time studying languages. For more than a decade I was in the practice of learning one new language every year. And I have a degree in the subject. So I do have some amount of expert knowledge. Virtue asked about the methodology. One does not have to be an Africanist to make general observations about linguistic methodology. And so I attempted to explain:...
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Re: Nationalism VS Assimilation

HonestBrother ·
You're proving my point... I'm not suggesting you follow anyone.... I'm also not denying that Diop was a genius... But even geniuses can be wrong... Even geniuses need other scholars to round out and test their work.. You can't build on Diop alone is my point Just as modern physics does not build on Einstein alone.... You can't just throw out ideas just because they're European in origin.
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Re: Nationalism VS Assimilation

HonestBrother ·
You have to test ideas on the merits - not based on their origin
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Re: The Word ["Amen"]

Fine ·
I too, cringe, HeruStar! It is true -- "Greek misinterpretation" does in fact have e-v-e-r-y-t-h-i-n-g off track -- in general -- and the true meaning of the work A-M-E-N -- in particular. Greeks knew nothing about the true essence of "Black Antiquity" -- and to this day they still don't want to know or care to know. They are copycat counterfeiters-in-denial of the truth/facts. In fact, the root of this very book [i.e. "basic instructions before leaving earth - the Bible] has its origin in...
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Re: I. The Right To Healthcare and Well-Being

urbansun ·
Sorry I am late to this. One thing I noticed about the book was the etiology (sickness origin) of all the disparity between blacks and whites was one thing --> Control The reason I was pissed at the book was because it was light on creating mechanism to increase community control, and strong on creating mechanisms by which government (white majority) would be the ones administering the things to correct the disparity. How irrational is that? That is why as a blanket answer to any question...
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Re: The Word ["Amen"]

Former Member ·
GREAT INFO! Most of the religious world doesn't overstand why Egypt is so prominant in the bible. All of the most important biblical characters at some point went to Egypt. Abraham (Ab-Heart, Ra-Most High God of Egypt, Ham-Hammites, black folk), Josesph, Moses(known as Thutmose in Egypt) and according to scriptures, even Jesus(known as Horus in Egypt) went there for 12 years. The word Amen, comes from the names of the Ancient Egyptians Gods, Amun,Amon,Atum,Atun,Aten and even Amen. Check out...
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Re: The Word ["Amen"]

HonestBrother ·
Now can we name any other verse in the Bible where this seems to be the case? That's granting that you're correct about the verse in Revelation. A book which was written in the 1st century AD (centuries after the bulk of the Old Testament) - probably one of the very last books of the Bible to be written. So even if you're correct about this one verse you still haven't accounted for the Biblical origin. The best you've maybe established is that the writer of Revelation was alluding to the...
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Re: The Word ["Amen"]

Former Member ·
HonestBrother, thank you for your opinion and dialogue. It challenges me to dig deep into my mental reservoir of facts that I have studied and researched for a number of years. I'm not here to argue or belittle anyone's belief or opinion. I'm a man of facts and I'm only posting the facts that have been discovered by many and my conclusion to what I feel those facts are. You brought up some very interesting points and yet have me a little confused on some of the nature of your questions.
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Re: The Word ["Amen"]

Former Member ·
************ Amen was never a Hebrew word. It was later pulled into Hebrew language. Just the phonetics of the word Amen alone, proves it's not of Hebrew origin. People seem to forget that Egypt existed before any of the biblical references or stories that are told OR documented in the bible. Historians and archeologists prove that Egypt was the first "civilization" of the world, not really but that's what history goes with. Thus, the Egyptian Deities names of Amon, Amun, Atum, Atun, Aten...
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Re: The Word ["Amen"]

HonestBrother ·
ntellect, in your response to me, you told me a lot of stuff that I already knew or had heard of... My essential point was that finding a (possible) reference to an Egyptian god in the very last book of the Bible does not prove that the word "Amen" is of Egyptian origin nor does it prove that Christians are evoking an Egyptian deity. And it's quite a stretch to use one verse in one of the last written Biblical books to prove something about a word that occurs in other books written centuries...
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Re: The Word ["Amen"]

Former Member ·
HonestBrother, you have every right to your opinion about this being pointless but to others, it's of ultimate importance. You say the word "Amen" is possibly not of Egyptian origin. Like I said, I'm a man of facts. Just show me when and where it was used before Egypt and I'll accept it. I couldn't begin to give you every scripture in the bible that pays homage to Egyptian Deities because there are so many but I could probably give you a good 20 off the top of the dome, if you would like.
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Re: The Word ["Amen"]

HonestBrother ·
ntellect, read the thread. I won't rehash so many things that have already been said. But just because a word in one language looks (when transliterated into a 3rd language) superficially like a word in another language (i.e., they're spelled or sound alike) DOES NOT MEAN they're the same word or even related. It's perfectly possible for it to be sheer coincidence. Many examples were produced earlier in this thread. Anyone who has actually studied several languages in depth knows that this...
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Re: Nation of Islam-KKK Konnection: fact or fiction?

sunnubian ·
It is obvious that there could or should be a connections or alliance between the Nation of Islam and the KKK because both groups want the exact same things; to oppress women, exploit religous beliefs and to be racial segregation. Also, I have seen Klan members being interviewed on talk shows on more than one occasion over the years who praise the Nation of Islam and actually say that its because the Klan and the Nation of Islam want the same things. It would not be inconcievable for me to...
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Re: NEGROID- A Question of phenotype?

Afroman ·
Compiled by 'Ayinde' a good friend of mine! Creation Of The Negro Extracts from: The name "negro" its origin and evil use: Richard B. Moore The name that you respond to determines the amount of your self worth. Similarly, the way a group of people collectively respond to a name can have devastating effects on their lives, particularly if they did not choose the name. Asians come from Asia and have pride in the Asian race' Europeans come from Europe and have pride in Europe accomplishments.
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Re: Something of a Revelation

Melesi ·
soul_doctor, If this is no place for egos, then you certainly do need to go somewhere else, for yours is as self-inflated as any I've seen. YOu start your original post with the statement that anything that any of your readers now believes "is irrelevant." That's a pretty presumptuous statement, really, indicative of an ego instead of a mind. But you are a single-minded evangelist on a mission, and nothing so little as the truth will stand in your way. YOu ahve all the truth that anyone...
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Re: Something of a Revelation

soul_doctor73 ·
Presumptuous, yes. Intentional actually, but at the time the futility wasn't apparent to me. You have me just about pegged: single-minded and on a mission, but no evangelist. The 'gospels' are all, for the most part, fiction. You will not find me preaching 'Jesus saves'. But of course, evangelist is your opinion, and I understand that. But you did grasp the elements of my 'mission' as you call it. Pretty perceptive. No. *You* placed linguistics and words at the center of *your* argument. I...
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Re: Christian ORIGIN of RACISM!

NSpirit ·
Nmaginate, Why does the secular humanist article seem to use the word "pagan" to describe everyone who is not a christian? What is the origin of the word Pagan?
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Re: Christian ORIGIN of RACISM!

Nmaginate ·
I doubt if that tells you about the "origin" of the word...
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Re: Have we forgotten the Australian Aborigine.

henry38 ·
I see. The only difference is if we go with your original post the link between Africans and blacks across the Atlantic is very clear, very recent and traceable. Africa is the motherland of all black people across the Atlantic and every black person across the Atlantic was stolen from the motherland, this means the two peoples are blood relatives. This also means all the wealth and riches of Africa still belong to these ones as well as to the Africans. On the other hand any link between...
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Re: Have we forgotten the Australian Aborigine.

Len ·
Where did you get this information that the Australian Aborigines come from Africa? Whether they identify as African origin or not they share a similar experience to Native American Indians, and black-Africans regarding European colonizers. They also share similar experiences with black Americans in that they are the poorest, unhealthiest; least employed, worst housed and most imprisoned Australians. In other words, they suffer hardship, and are discriminated against based on the color of...
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Re: Mary Magdalene: Prostitute or Apostle?

Prophetessofrage ·
Love this topic! Have been editing work on the same truth with regard to this FEMALE APOSTLE of Yeshua Hamashiach the Black Messiah. Mary Magdala is another black woman of Semitic/Khemetic origin whose ethnicity as well as true relationship with Yeshua is a part of the BLACK WOMAN LIBERATION HOUR! Not only Mary Magdala but Mary of Bethany and the woman at the well, as well as the many women in Yeshua's ministry were purposely defamed by ill-bred, racist, sexist, males. This is a proven fact.
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Re: Something of a Revelation

Melesi ·
soul_doctor, Sorry I haven't been around lately. A friend of mine committed suicide and I've been with the family instead of here. In fact, the funeral is soon today, so I won't have time to answer much that you posted. What I can do now I will, and I'll be back later--in a day or two probably--to answer more. Tonight I have to teach an Urban Search and Rescue class, tomorrow night I take my German student and a couple of his friends to a play, Saturday I have to build a set for another...
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Re: Racism & the Victim Mentality

Kevin41 ·
I am waiting on that mature thinking also...and it damn sure cannot consist of excusing racism as something to accept and live with or denying its origin as it has been implemented towards black people in america......that wouldn't be mature...that would be delusional....
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Re: Mary Magdalene: Prostitute or Apostle?

Prophetessofrage ·
Hi Melesi, yes the 'translators' did purposely DISTORT the Bible to teach SEXIST as well as RACIST evil and this is why women are oppressed under the banner of the 'religions' calling themselves Christians. There's just too much evidence out there to refute the blatant patriarchy evil. Modern day white religions all have their origin from the Bishops who gathered at the various councils to decide what white males and their colored proselytes mentality and will for 'women' Christians would...
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Re: Have we forgotten the Australian Aborigine.

James Wesley Chester ·
I don't have anything to add to the discussion on "origin." Although I have heard that Australian organizations have begun an outreach to African American organizations. I am posting because my inspiration for creating a flag for African American. in addition to and beyond the flag of the African Diaspora, came from the Australian athlete in the Olympics taking her victory lap carrying the flag of Aboriginal Australians. It was the "bright light" for me. PEACE Jim Chester You are who you say...
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Re: Mary Magdalene: Prostitute or Apostle?

Prophetessofrage ·
Psst...melei ole girl, over here. Do I get a "f" from computer/internet grammar school inc. or sumptin' that YOU should fret over the way I phrase my words on my bought and paid for computer? Now, to stop you from making a further uh...whatever of yourself, let me say this, What's your race? Who are you? What is your objective in talking to me? Are you the computer school grammar teacher going around correcting the grammar of strangers on computer? Let me try this one more time and see if it...
 
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