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Tagged With "How Right-Wing Religion Infiltrates"

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Re: Why are we comfortable with Euro-paganism and not African?

Oshun Auset ·
That hit's to the core of my point on this thread... BTW I like your contributions to the forum. Honest Brother you are! Don't even get me started about who is at most of the Reaggae and Continental African musical concerts I go to... Besides the Carribean and continental born Africans of course...Those of us born in the states are beyond low in attendence! It's a damn shame!
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Re: Negroes who defend the status quo once they've "gotten theirs"

Kevin41 ·
Uppity Negress, Blacks maintained SOCIALLY conservative views during our advancement, not POLITICALLY conservative views. One has to do with family marriage, religion and morality which we are all for. The other relates to politics and policies such as repeals on AA that has always worked adversely against blacks...and if you ever look at what the black majority believes in, the political conservatives are diametrically opposed to it 100% of the time. That tells me that one of two things are...
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Re: Negroes who defend the status quo once they've "gotten theirs"

UppityNegress ·
OK, I see the how you distinguish the two, although there does seem to be a bit of gray area. For example, is being anti-homosexual a social or poltical issues? It seems social, IMO, but if the last wave of election count for anything, the right sure played it like a political issue. You say that political conservatives are diametrically opossed to the Black majority. The only issues I can think of now are AA and death penalty reform. What are the others?
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Re: Negroes who defend the status quo once they've "gotten theirs"

Empty Purnata ·
So has Nmaginate (he says it more often than Kevin). You get called that because you are so apologetic and defensive of the White Establishment. However, nothing that Kevin said justified your comment about his mother. I thought you were such a "Christian" man? What happened to "turn the other cheek"? I see Neoconservatives like to throw religion around when it is beneficiary in propaganda, then disregard it when it is convenient.
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Re: Tolerance of Intolerance?

HonestBrother ·
Kresge, that's a good question. I suppose the immediate context is Melesi's accusation that I don't give his posts a fair reading. But to be fair, it goes far beyond that. As a single non-Christian, who has just moved to a new town, living in the Bible belt, in a place where the first thing people ask you when they meet you is "Where do you go to church?", in a place where even in the online dating community the women all declare "You can't love me if you can't love Jesus", I frankly find...
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Re: Law, Morality, and Christians

Melesi ·
nikcara, You have more than one point in your post. I will try to address them, but I hope you can forgive me if I miss one or two. Do we have differing definitions of "Christian"? What is a Christian to you? Yes, Christians do differ on issues, but they differ usually because they've started from different points of view. They have different conclusions about the world to begin with, thus they have certain differences in their worldviews, which is part of the point that I made originally.
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Re: Tolerance of Intolerance?

kresge ·
I am grieved to hear about your experience. I spent 12 years in academia as a college/university chaplain. Before my theological training, however, I obtained a B.S. in physics and mathematics, and an M.A. in physics. So I think that I might be able to relate to your situation from several positions. With respect to the AA community, I think that science and mathematics, little priority seems to be given to these disciplines. There seems to be much more of a connection with arts associated...
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Re: Law, Morality, and Christians

Empty Purnata ·
Alright, here's the reality of the land: America was founded on Englightenment Principles (the ideas in our Constitution are borrowed from the French Constitution and inspired by Englightenment Age philosophy on liberty, freedom and justice). There is a radical Seperation of Church and State. Church cannot regulate religious beliefs as laws, and the State cannot regulate religious beliefs. This is mutally beneficial, it provides a safe, bias-free (in theory) system that does not make...
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Re: Law, Morality, and Christians

Melesi ·
EP, Yes, John Locke and the idea of universal rights is very European, though they did not spring full-grown from the head of the French Revolution, especially that part of it that so quickly degenerated into the Reign of Terror and was well criticized by such as Edmund Burke, a supporter of much of the American philosophy. But this couldn't have arisen without the ground of the Christian faith. It's no wonder that the Magna Carta was forced on King John in England. It was a first step...
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Re: Why do souls come to Earth?

Melesi ·
The "second death" is a phrase in the Revelation of John describing spiritual death and one's choice of and consignment to hell. It's not considered a good thing. The western Church for a long time took the Stoic/Neoplatonist idea that the flesh is "bad" and evil, but ever since the Reformation that has not been a serious concept. Now ansd then someone would revive the idea, but it never found much currency. When the Bible became cheap and readily available, the description of the world...
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Re: The Bridge: Black Men & White Women (article)

Blacksanction ·
MLM I believe that it depends on the persons who are making the love connection. We all bring baggage to a relationship (some bring more than others). Example some white women might pick a black man because she was abused by white guys in her previous relationships. Some black women have done the reverse and if you interviewed both would say that it is because they are treated with respect. I am still trying to figure out one of my wife's friends who was married and had four children. She...
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Re: Negroes who defend the status quo once they've "gotten theirs"

Kevin41 ·
Affirmative Action: Who Benefits? -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Contents A Policy That Suffers an Identity Crisis Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About Affirmative Action Where Do We Go From Here? Bibliography -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- A Policy That Suffers an Identity Crisis Few social policy issues have served as a better gauge of racial and ethnic divisions among the American...
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Re: The Bridge: Black Men & White Women (article)

HonestBrother ·
Issues? like? In my experience you're right on the mark.
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Re: Question for Kresge?

FireFly ·
hello Rowe, thanks for contributing. Yes, I agree with your comments immediately above. As it is I have always had a few 'issues' with Christianity and some of its concepts even though I was raised as a christian in my family but we 'won't go there'. I'm sure it's obvious I have a very limited education of world religions, and have been slowly reading up about all the 'alternatives'. I still find flaws but to date, the closest religion I find favour with has been Hinduism. African religions...
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Re: Question for Kresge?

Rowe ·
This topic is of great interest to me as well. However, because of the diversity of African cultures, and its widespread aspects, I reject the simplistic use of attributive terms such as "ancestor worship," "fetishism," and "animism" as definitions of African religion. Even among converts to Islam or Christianity, you will find elements of traditional African spirituality. In the Hebrew Bible, for example, animal sacrifices are common, rituals are performed, polygamy is an acceptable form of...
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Re: MBM: WHERE'S THE UNIFICATION?

Rowe ·
Um, it may have something to do with the fact that you are in the Issues/Politics forum? Politics, much like religion and racial matters are very controversial subjects. You will find people everywhere, not just Blacks in particular, who are divided on these issues. Therefore, trying to get members on the board to reach some sort of unified concensus is unrealistic, in my opinion. However, I think what you are noticing, as a new member, is an ongoing, rather hostile and verbally explicit...
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Re: Dorothy Dandridge....now there was a woman

HonestBrother ·
Yes Lawd...Now that'll make a man get religion...
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Re: Al Sharpton Accuses Bush Of Fueling Homophobia Among Blacks

Empty Purnata ·
I'm not referring to him you goddamned idiot, I was referring to you. It matters not whether or not your religion or your interpretation of a holy book agrees with the concept of Gay Marriage. What matters is what the Constitution says. What about Seperation of Church and State? The First Amendment.
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Re: Al Sharpton Accuses Bush Of Fueling Homophobia Among Blacks

Black Viking ·
You finally got something straight. Yes, a benefit that is afforded one group of people to the exclusion of another based on race, religion, gender, ethnicity, sexual-orientation, or disability is illegal discimination, and therefore oppression. BTW, it's also unconstitutional. Healthcare coverage has nothing to do with anything. Insurance companies set their own policies. No one has a constitutional right to healthcare. They should, but they don't. What does this mean? You make it sound as...
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Re: Al Sharpton Accuses Bush Of Fueling Homophobia Among Blacks

Huey ·
Just curious, but did MSNBC actually misspelled Niger Innis's name on purpose/or by accident, or is that Photoshop?
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Re: Black Unity: Moving Beyond The RHETORIC

Empty Purnata ·
NOW THIS IS KEY RIGHT HERE. I'm glad that you posted this, Nmag. Now these are things which harm Black Unity in America more than anything else (I would also add those who view quick monetary gain through illegal activity as "acceptable" to the dis-unity list). For Black Unity to be achieved, we also need more communal ethic with Black Businesses. Many Black Businesses operate just like White Businesses and just do business with whoever the highest bidder is (so in the end, it doesn't help...
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Re: Kola Boof Speaks: Race & Beauty In America

Rowe ·
Sister Kola speaks volumes in her discussion about race and beauty in America. Her thorough discussion about the ways in which the White supremacist concept of whiteness has impacted people globally is reminiscent of the research done by Neely Fuller and Dr. Francis Welsing. I'm certain her analysis has been heavily influenced by Dr. Fuller's United Independent Compensatory Code. Thanks for sharing. Loved it! What is Beauty? Within a world dominated by White Supremacy it is vitally important...
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Re: Conservative Whites vs. Liberal Whites

MidLifeMan ·
Not sure if your question was for the group or for a particluar person so if forgive my response if "jumped into the middle of the conversation". The answer is yes. To say otherwise would be to generalize. Like Malcolm realized after is trip to Mecca, it's not the race or color of the peope but the mentality. To LABEL whole groups of people as inheriently bad is wrong. The nature of men does not change with races, class, gender, or religion. We ALL have our good and bad traits. The problem...
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Re: Asking too much?

tru2urself16 ·
I've waited to repsond to some of the things posted because I wanted to think about my reasoning for my choice. Now I can't say that my choice has anything to do with religion or thinking that by beinging a virgin I am holy or clean, it's not. I respect people who have different views than mine and I think that it's your own choice and that you have to do what;s right for you. In the past few days I've been thinking about that more and more. That I have to do what's right for me just like...
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Re: Asking too much?

MidLifeMan ·
You obviously have a good head and heart. There is NOTHING wrong with your reasoning. Everyone that has responded gave some very good advice. I learned a very important lesson at a very early age and it helped me to avoid making some bad decisions. The lesson I learned is that TRUE friends accept you for who and what you are. A real friend is not going to "encourage" you to do something that you don't want to do or would cause harm. I wish more young people could learn this and stop making...
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Re: Pope: Embryo = "Full and complete human being"

James Wesley Chester ·
I like the 'viable on its own without assistance' approach. But that's science, and science says, 'Yeah, but that fetus can survive with assistance.' I still prefer the first practice of viability. The Pope's interpretation is religion. I'm not Catholic. When I was a child, until I was a full adult, you didn't take your pregnant wife to the Catholic hospital unless you didn't care about the life of you wife. They would let her die without blinking an eye. And...tell you that's the way God...
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Re: Life After Limbo

MBM ·
Great. Are they consistent with scripture or not? Unnecessary . . . interesting. It is "unnecessary" now because some old dinasours in Rome say it is. 100 years ago was it? Has God's word changed in those 100 years? The point is that religion can be as much about man's quest for power and control as about God and salvation. IMO this is an example of a foolish practice dying (thankfully) at the hands of the people. Integrity? No - there are FAR meatier examples of the Catholics being out of...
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Re: Danish Newspaper And Mohammed Cartoon

Vox ·
I think it goes a little deeper than that, though, Faheem. When I said that I can't pretend to understand the mindset, I had in mind my miniscule, rudimentary understanding of the impact on Muslims from the Middle East on the fact that they largely come from a ethnic culture that derives a huge portion of its identity from religion. Islam isn't just a religion; it is probably the primary influence on their culture (even on those there who aren't Muslim). I suspect that this makes it much...
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Re: Danish Newspaper And Mohammed Cartoon

UppityNegress ·
The cartoons were originally commisioned to test the boundaries of free speech in Denmark. An ethnically Danish author who was writing a pro-Muslim children's book on Islam, couldn't find anyone to illustrate it for fear of violence and persecution from the Muslims in Denmark. He questioned whether political correctness in regards to Muslims was hindering free speech in the country. The newspaper drawings were meant as a test--granted, a rather childish one. The smarter option would have...
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Re: Danish Newspaper And Mohammed Cartoon

Nmaginate ·
BUT you did not answer me question and "I stand by my view" that the Christ and Christian images are not comparably "sacred" in Christendom. Symbols of Christ, no matter what the lay or particular Christians feel about them [read: Christians angry enough over 'The Last Tempation of Christ' to call in bomb threats] , just aren't as sacred. It just doesn't translate. It's not the same language or the same word. There's a deeper, different meaning because of the very different tradition in...
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Re: Another Danish? Noah's "I wonder what?"

UppityNegress ·
I suppose that argument would have some merit in Palestine, but that situation isn't comparable to what is happening in northern Europe. Muslims in Scandinavia especially are far from ocupied--hell, they willingly migrated there to escape the poverty and extremism of their own countries! Having lived in the area for a brief period, I can say that while there is racism (or perhaps more accurately, culturism) in places like Denmark and Sweden, the Muslims there are segregated from mainstream...
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Re: Spiritual Autobiography

HonestBrother ·
I'm an odd bird. On the one hand, I'm a very rational person. Extremely logical. And naturally given to healthy doses of skepticism. I find it impossible to be religiously dogmatic. But at the same time, I have certain marked mystical tendencies. At age 11, I read a book by Albert Einstein called "Ideas and Opinions". It had a very profound influence. I became agnostic after that. I remember deciding that I no longer believed in Jesus and told my parents that I didn't want anything for...
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Re: Danish Newspaper And Mohammed Cartoon

kresge ·
Yes, democracy means problems and conflicts without an ultimate resolution. This does mean that some situations might reach an amicable conclusion, but as soon as one problem is solved, many more would arise. I do not believe that democracy is a state of affairs. It is a process, dynamic, dialogical, agonistic, and messy. Does that answer your question?
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Re: Should God?

HeruStar ·
Ancient practices aren't applicable to modern times. As far as ancient interpretations go... Whatever religion you are, I'm sure their is an enlightened individual that gives THE original interpretation. Now today, with our unenlightened minds, we feel that we can re-interpret, or out-smart/out-wit/out-interpret the enlightened.
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Re: Should God?

Empty Purnata ·
1) What makes you assume there is any ONE correct "THE" interpretation? What makes you assume exclusivism? 2) What makes you assume people in the past are any more enlightened than people of today? 1) What makes you assume that people today are so unenlightened? 2) What makes you assume the ancients were any more enlightened? 3) What makes you assume the original interpretation was more "correct"? 4) Isn't it possible many ancient interpretations weren't simply re-interpretations of even...
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Re: Life After Limbo

Melesi ·
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Great. Are they consistent with scripture or not? +++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Wrong question because it is too general. That they are not inconsistent means that they are consistent under the right circumstances or with the right and possible interpretation. ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Unnecessary . . . interesting. It is "unnecessary" now because some old dinasours in Rome say it is. 100 years ago was it? Has God's word changed in those 100 years?
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Re: Life After Limbo

MBM ·
Principle? Since when is principle the guiding light of religion? Those people who committed suicide to link up with a comet about 10 years a did so out of principle. So what? For the sake of argument, whether you believe the argument or not, could you concoct a logical religous argument against condoms in a world where millions upon millions of people could save their lives with them?
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Re: Untitled--Just Disappointed and Upset

HonestBrother ·
Sista Rowe, I have no good advice to offer. I do greatly sympathize. I fear that I may be dealing with a similar situation some time soon. My household was not conscious but my parents were sufficiently apathetic towards religion to allow me (perhaps - probably - unintentionally) the freedom to experiment and make up my own mind. My mother is getting older now and is perhaps facing an existential crisis of sorts - she seems depressed. I notice that she talks more about involvement in the...
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Re: Untitled--Just Disappointed and Upset

Empty Purnata ·
That's part of how it began with my mother and father. I noticed that they began becoming more involved with the church as their physical bodies started failing them (my dad used to be an athlete and he is ex-military, he always prided himself on physical fitness, but now he is getting overweight and his legs aren't what they used to be anymore; my mother also used to be athletic, but she has put on weight over the years and after she broke her leg, she became depedent; my parents are also...
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Re: Untitled--Just Disappointed and Upset

kresge ·
As a recovering Fundamentalist, I can understand the attraction. There are both rational and irrational aspects to it. I think that the transition out for me was smother than some because of my rationalist tendencies. For others, however, I think that fundamentalism is about belonging and a felt need for certainty in ones life. It is incredibly difficult for most of us to live with ambiguity and complexity. Its so much easier when everything is black and white. Just a couple of things off...
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Re: Untitled--Just Disappointed and Upset

Rowe ·
Brother Honestbrother, thanks for replying. This is why I posted my concern in this discussion forum. It would do nothing for me to write all of this in a journal, having received any feedback. So I greatly appreciate your response and sympathy. I hope your mom feels better soon.
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Re: Untitled--Just Disappointed and Upset

Rowe ·
My sister is only 25 years old, and yes, she has recently graduated from college and is in search for a job. So your evaluation might be correct here. More great advice. I too am beginning to have those dreams, except the goal in my dreams is to either protect or secure my sister away from harm. Then you're much more noble than I. My sister and I are not speaking to one another because I can't even have a normal conversation with her. It's like speaking to a brick wall. There is no...
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Re: Untitled--Just Disappointed and Upset

FireFly ·
I don't know the answer to this. I should say upfront that I am not a religion-hater. Even as an atheist (or natrualist??) I believe all religions have something wonderful to offer us. It is SO darn hard and I really feel for you. All you can do is 'be there' for her. You cannot blame yourself. It is HER journey. And much as we love people close to us, we cannot live their experiences for them. I hope your sis can pick up the good things from her religion and carry them into something more...
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Re: Untitled--Just Disappointed and Upset

Empty Purnata ·
I know what you mean, those were the warning signs with my parents too. But, as horrific as I just made my parents sound, it's not all that bad all the time. Many days, their religious shenanigans were just laughable in my mind. Like they would get all worked up in a frenzy if they saw two guys kiss on TV. It was those egrigious incidents that made them so bad. But, I'd have to say, my parents, as of late, seem to be getting better. I just had a conversation with my parents today and the...
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Re: The One....

HonestBrother ·
What I want or am looking for ? .... To be understood. To be appreciated. To be accepted. That probably sounds very one sided (and maybe even a little self-indulgent). Of course, I think understanding, appreciation, and acceptance should be things I'm also able to give to "the one". But I put it like that because I really don't feel I've ever had that from a sista. Please no one get upset. That's not a general statement about all black women. It's just my experience which I hope will change...
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Re: Untitled--Just Disappointed and Upset

EbonyRose ·
Wow ... y'all are really scaring me here Although I have no personal family experiences like what has been written here (my family is very much a "It's your thing, do what you want to do" type and my mom (was) and my sister (is) the hardcore "spiritualists" of the family, but the religion is not Christian ... although the same zealousness to convert is ever present! ) So, Rowe, I do sympathize with you, but I cannot offer you much assistance with your dilemma. However, I did have such a...
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Re: The One....

Khalliqa ·
It's hard for me to believe that a brother with such great credentials is not snapped up already..... But may I add, hmmmm... not on the Beyonce bandwagon? I'm a lover of the intelligence of the human mind.... which the sister does not strike me as having in any significant quantity..... however I understand her allure....and it's not just her physical attributes.... it's her acceptance of her feminine attributes and the power and acceptance of those qualities that generate the magnetic...
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Re: The Spiritual Problem With Modernist Art

FireFly ·
Great that you posted these musings Melesi. I don't have common reference points with you as far as a diet of Arthur Miller or Jose Ortega y Gassett, so my response is more intuitive, being someone who does draw and paint. And therefore subjective, which all discussion of art ultimately is. I'd like to know your own personal thoughts and interactions on/with modern art though, references aside. First off, every artist is an individual. They may be popularist, obscure, political, commercial,...
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Re: Who Were You In Your Last Life?

Rowe ·
I don't know how you feel about it, but you were male in your last earthly incarnation: You were born somewhere in the territory of modern South China around the year 725. Your profession was that of a digger, undertaker . Your brief psychological profile in your past life: Revolutionary type. You inspired changes in any sphere - politics, business, religion, housekeeping. You could have been a leader. The lesson that your last past life brought to your present incarnation: You are bound to...
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Re: The One....

HonestBrother ·
As a scholar, I'm a research mathematician by education and profession. I'm also a student of religion and philosophy. As an artist, see the thread HB's Art Show in the Music-Entertainment-Arts Forum. I also write poetry, fiction, and essays. As an activist, I've advocated for a number of causes in my community. Currently I'm working on a somewhat unusual project. I'm putting together a Black History Month photo exhibit featuring local people - updating and democratizing the imagery of black...
 
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