Reply to "Wanted: A Good Black Woman"

quote:
Originally posted by ShayaButHer:
If I may, I wondered the same thing until I got back to the basics of what he was saying...I understood that statement to mean that "she" is not being all "We are the world" to the point of ignoring the issues that concern US, African/Indian/Black People, as a whole. "She" can love all of the rest of the world, but her loyalty is and always will be with her people. "She" is mindful not to forget who SHE IS....she remembers and always pays homage to her roots....or as my father used to warn when


But if you understand multiculturalism in the way that I do, then you would know that subscribing to multiculturalism isn't a betrayal of your cultural hertiage nor does it require you to abandon your cultural roots. I figured your explanation was probably the reason why Afro Saxon feels he doesn't want someone who subscribes to multiculturalism.

First of all, multiculturalism is simply a doctrine which proposes that several different cultures can harmoniously and equitably coexist in a single country. Multiculturalism doesn't ignore issues that are unique to diverse cultural groups, and it is does not suggest that one should completely forget about his or her cultural identity. That is not an accurate perception of multiculturalism. In fact, multiculturalism advocates a society that extends equitable status to distinct cultural and religious groups, with NO culture predominating. However, I know that by the time someone finishes reading my statement, he or she is going to get the urge to follow up this response by saying that most Whites while (rhetorically) claiming to be multiculturalists in public are really interested in making certain that their race and culture(s) take precedence over others in private, but the same can be said for Whites who claim to be strong propoments of justice, brotherhood, and freedom. Therefore, regardless of the term, how White people relate to them does not change their meanings.

Ultimately, you have to be responsible for how you represent what you believe. I've come to realize that you can't control anyone else's behavior. If you believe in freedom, justice, and a world that is multicuturally aware and appreciative, then you live by the beliefs and values that you have. And that's what I try to do.
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