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Reply to "The Word ["Amen"]"

Peace....


quote:
Am I reading this thread correctly? Did Cheikh Anta Diop put forth effort at trying to prove that the word "Amen" from hebrew is a related to the name of Kemetic God Amun?


This was not the express purpose of Cheikh Anta Diop's work, however, included within Professor Diop's findings is the requisite evidence necessary to demonstrate a very well established union between the original practices, and language of the hebrews, with that of the people in ancient Kemet.

quote:
I mean, I have no problem believing that they're related words -- Amen means "verily," and I see a relationship between "truth" and that which is brought to "light."


The relationship between the words goes far beyond the interpretation of the term. The Bible was prepared by students out of the Kemetic Mysteries. This thread questions the correlation between the Hebraic root of the word "Amen" and the kemetic root usage. Of course it is obvious upon simple examination that the hebrew religion is not the same as Kemetic orthodoxy, however, the religion, and customs of the hebrew is tied to the parent culture which is ancient KMT, and the parent religion which is Maat.

And so to sum this up, when a Christian, Jew, muslim or other ends a prayer by saying "Amen" they are reproducing an act of religious devotion originally intended to invoke "The Hidden One"....

quote:
The languages are both Semitic, and so it's possible either that one derived from the other
or that they BOTH derived from some earlier, proto-Semitic word having something to do with light


The possibilty has grown to a very strong probability if we pay attention to the works of our own scholars.

quote:
But Diop... Is this precise question -- the relationship between these words -- really the subject of intense scholarly debate? (Not that I respect most of Diop's findings on matters like this, but still...)



Not really...I think things took a turn here once someone implied that the semitic hebrew usage of "Amen" may have developed independent of the other semitic usage...This idea is very problematic considering that the languages developed in the same area, and share a parent language...

And by the by, providing scholarly research, relevant to this topic, is where Cheikh Anta Diop made some of his greatest contributions. Diop was heavily criticized by his peers, however in open debate, his detractors were silenced by the ovewhelming clarity of his findings.



Kai
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