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Reply to "The Sons and Daughters of Hip Hop"

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Originally posted by HeruStar:
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Unnessary burden"? Do you really think the struggle is over and we, as a people have nowhere else to go? And if it is not you, our youth, who is going to take us there, then who do you supposed we look up to?



No maam, I don't think the struggle is over. Hip-hop is a form of revolution (not fluffy renaissance) that our Mothers and Fathers don't understand. If you look at the spirit of hip hop as a whole you will understand that we rebel. We rebel against our opposers who deny us Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of OWNERSHIP of our rightful compensation. We can't obtain this through an intellectual medium, because half of us (our artist) don't have a formal education. But we can darn sure express ourselves.

When our leaders give us access to positive and forward moving education, maybe then we'll require our artist to have at least a bachelor's degree.

Heru,
As I said early, I do believe that there is a great deal of potential that has been in hip-hop for some time. Yet, if we are talking revolution, are we not talking about political, economic, social, and cultural power. How do you see specifically hip-hop addressing these issues. How does hip-hop confront those institutions and structures that subjugate, dominate, exploit, and marginalize the oppressed?

You mention a bachelor's degree for example. I concur with virtue that it may not be a prerequisite, but what in lieu the academy has hip-hop provided in any significant fashion educationally. While there are true autodidacts that acquire a great deal of knowledge and wisdom through the dent of their own will, this is not true for most people. They need some kind of structure and community in which to be educated.

Likewise, with respect to the economic well being of the community, I hear, and importantly see very little in hip-hop that provides a critique of capitalism and the market society. Instead of radical redistribution of wealth, I see excess, indulgence, extravagance. You mention charitable organizations, but what percentage of ones resources are you talking about.

Finally, this leads to the issue of an ethic. The ethic that I see in hip-hop is not one of delayed gratification, sacrifice, altruism, and community. It is often one of commodification, objectification, and violence. As such, again, it is not really a critique or alternative to the status quo. Thus, where is the revolution.

I would love to be wrong in my analysis. I do listen to Tupac, Dead Prez, Immortal Technique, The Coup, Zion I, Talib Kweli, Michael Franti, Mos Def, Wyclef as well as "old school" stuff such as PE, BDP and KRS-1, X-Clan, and Gil Scott Heron.
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