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Reply to "The Effect of Public Schools on Our Kids"

Just to add to what Rowe's above post,

There is also a problem with poor blacks being directly involved in what is going on in their school systems/districts. From what I see, it also depends on whether or not what monies are spent and how, when, where, and why will be questioned and or scrutinized by the greater community. Often African Americans do not question how much money is going into their children's schools, where, when and how it is being spent, which would be another reason for schools in non-poor districts/communities being better equipped and maintained and staffed than those in poorer districts/communities, since middle class whites/others have usually WILL be the ones to question the school funding, may be more likely to have a knowledge the legal obligations of the school/district to students attending and the community at large, may be able to draw the probono or otherwise legal expertise from within their own community of parents and/or friends if there is a question of funding and/or quality of education being taught and/or students' rights.

Also, I would like to add that one reason that poor students perform poorly that is never discussed or admitted to is the fact that they are treated differently in some or most cases and are not expected to perform any other way by even the teachers that teach them. In a lot of cases vibes the students pick up on and the attitudes teachers often display towards them (while they are in contact with them for as much as six hours per day) usually already sub-consciously engrains a psychological 'self-fulfilling prophecy of failing and/or failure and unworthiness, causing young minds to loose interest early, give up easily, or in defense and/or retalliation against such negativity directed toward them, 'cut off their nose to spite their face' by refusing to perform or to perform to the fulliest potential.

Finally, the fundamentals of education rarely changes enough for it to matter a lot whether or not books are new, etc., or that state of the art equipment is priority, but it does matter the teachers' attitude toward teaching and the students that are being taught and also, (another thing that is rarely mentioned), that teachers be allowed to teach, and not be so restricted by rules and regulations that have nothing to do with teaching, but often merely interfere with the teachers' ability to teach AND DISCIPLINE in the classroom. Right now, it really appears that the average teacher spends a large percentage of time that could be used for teaching doing administrative paperwork, (another thing that has little if anything to do with teaching).
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