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Reply to "The Effect of Public Schools on Our Kids"

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Why, if not the home environment, are the almighty 'standardized test scores' so much better for the school that gets LESS money?


The schools to which I am referring, and Kozol describes in his book, are the schools and students who suffer from the poorest conditions and community environments, schools where the student population is made up of mainly African American students. In these schools, the students are not academically on par with students who attend affluent private schools and public schools. In terms of their academic consistency, they do not perform as well as well as mainstream students. A brief surge in standardized test scores over a course of a few years cannot be counted as making improvements if the scores cannot remain constant. Furthermore, it is no secret that African American students do not perform as well as White and Asian students on standardized tests. The world of academia is flooded with research confirming this assertion in addition to research designed to solve, or at least address this problem.

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Another question, we rehab properties in Trenton, NJ and routinely pass the high school there at opening and closing. It is so rare as to be noteable to see any kids carrying books into or out of the school. Why?


Here, readers are getting conflicting messages in argument. At the start of your argument, you praise the students in your district for performing well on standardized test scores despite limited funding. Now, you discuss concerns about the students in your district arriving to school having no books. How can the students perform well on standardized test(despite limited funding) if they rarely arrive to school with any books?
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