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Reply to "The Effect of Public Schools on Our Kids"

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Their teachers this year simply are not up to par. One of my sisters told me a disheartening tale last week about her teacher. It was simple really...My sister went up to the teacher for a pass to the office. The teacher told my sister to leave her alone.


What the child neglected to tell you was that many students are asking for passes to be excused NOT because they want to "go to the bathroom," as they say, but because they wish to roam the halls. What gets me is when children run home to tell their parents selective information that will make them appear as angels and the teachers as evil demons bent on making their child's life a living hell. Parents must realize that before they buy into a child's story, you MUST get the full picture of what is taking inside the classroom. If a problem is consistent, request a parent-teacher's conference. Never go charging into a teacher's classroom making accusations when you failed to get both sides of the situation.

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I'm worried about "the future of our children". Is it a public school problem, a home problem, a combination of both? Something else?


How Can Schools Attract Black and Latino Teachers and Prepare White Teachers?

I'm worried about the future of students AND the future of teachers. A growing number of students entering our school systems today are nonwhite students coming from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Interestingly enough however, many of the students enrolling into teacher education programs are WHITE FEMALES! School systems across the country are reporting a shortage in Black and Latino teachers, a shortgage that is dropping every year. Consequently, researchers have predicted that many Black and Latino students will be taught by predominately White women. Therefore, I'm worried that our schools are not doing enough to attract teachers of color AND they are doing enough to prepare White teachers for diverse classrooms. For example, every education program around the country should require teacher candidates (as well as new teachers) to take a minimum of five Spanish and/or Japanese courses. This way, teachers will be able to at least communicate with their bilingual students. Unfortunately however, many teacher education programs are not equipping preservice teachers will these skills. Many programs are still preparing teachers as if White, middle-class, English-speaking students will be the majority.
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