Reply to "Our Sisterfriend Rachael Dolezal once sued Howard University over racism for not hiring her to a teaching post"

sunnubian posted:

I think they made too big of a deal about her in the first place, I mean, I couldn't see what sooooooo wrong with her claiming to be Black from the context in which she explained it.  

Hell, there are countless White people in America that don't deal with nobody but Black people, that walk, "talk", dress, and live Black; who have essentially given up their "Whiteness" in favor of "Blackness".  

I believe her story was deliberately given so much press to shame other White people from adopting the Black race, and to humiliate her for doing so.  

Hell, how many people are passing for "White"as we speak?  

How many passed as "White" after Slavery?

During Reconstruction?

During jim crow?

How many Black women are walking around with their nappy hair chemically relaxed or heat straightened?  

And, [shamefully], how many Black women are getting cancer and/or scarred for life trying to bleach their beautiful black and brown and tan skin white or lighter?

How many Black people, in America (and globally) are walking around literally mimicking EVERYTHING White people do or say?

So, I think the criticism and 'outrage' was over-kill on Rachel Dolezal, and that if anything, Black people should have been insulted that her [or anyone else] wanting to be Black was viewed as so outrageous that it deserved to be put under a microscope, psychoanalyzed, and dissected into a million pieces, in the first place.

 

I believe her story was deliberately given so much press to shame other White people from adopting the Black race, and to humiliate her for doing so.  

Excellent points! But I do think it was foul basing that lawsuit on reverse racism, it smacks of entitlement. 

When you contrast what Black women do with nappy hair, why is the reverse such a big deal? 

A Black family took in a white kid they were babysitting and for some reason the mother never came back for him. After so many days they went to where she was staying and got his stuff and took him in and treated him like family. He was a really a quiet dude hardly ever said a word. And he never had a lot of friends but he was one tough white boy. He seemed like he was depressed, hardly ever smiled or laugh.

But he was as Black as anyone on the block and I never forget a white boy at school called him a nigger because Timmy dressed with Black taste, spoke with a Black accent. Timmy beat his ass and dragged his face on a hot black tar street, Timmy could throw down with the best of them. This was back in the day when boys took turns fighting each other and that white boy had no idea Timmy had skills honed in the hood. He married his step sister and no one batted an eye.  

Blackness is culture too, not just what we look like. 

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