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Reply to "Should Affluent Blacks Stay or Flee Blighted Communities."

"I haven't read all of this thread (I will), but I wanted to mention that from a strictly financial standpoint, the answer to this is pretty clear. There are many traditionally black communities that are currently the focus of tremendous investment and growth (i.e. gentrification). The more we can hang in there in these communities, or be a part of the reinvestment plans, the more we will obtain both financial and community benefits."

---posted by MBM

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"Gentrification Of Urbran Neighborhoods" thread by Empty Purnata:



Posted December 30, 2005 10:36 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gentrification

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Posts: 602 | Registered: October 29, 2005
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Response:


sunnubian
Master of The Universe

Posted December 30, 2005 10:58 AM
This is something else I have witnessed taking place a lot over the past two decades. I remember when I was working for social services in my hometown and I was talking with one of the social workers who was new to the state, etc., and he said that he lived in "__________ apartments", and I remember telling him that he may want to find somewhere else to live, etc., but was then interupted by another co-worker, who basically said, 'oh, it not like that anymore, they have renovated that whole block" . . . which was the truth and one of my first exposures to 'gentrification.'

This process brings me to why Cosby's statements, flipping the scrip onto the the poor just burns me up, since, if anyone has 'dropped the ball' it has been the Black upper class, those with the money to invest in these communities (and get rich doing so) since the property value in some case is damn near nothing, and would be a way that Black people with money COULD invest in declining Black communities, and in turn, having all or most of the property owned and not rented, and by other Black people at that - and with property owners collectively having more say so in community rights, ordinances, rules and regulations, be able to turn predominately Black communities around, even if through 'gentrification' of sorts, but leaving all or the majority Black owned.
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