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Reply to "Reparations v. Eliminating Race Specific Claims"

quote:
The argument is completely nonsensical from a legal perspective. It seems more driven by fear, than by logic or legal precedent.

That said, I'm curious about how people evaluate the trade-off.
One thing to note, though, is how markedly different African-Americans are regarded when compared to Jews and Japanese-Americans. Though made out of fear or other such emotions, they are hardly misplaced. There is plenty of reasons to have those "fears"/emotions. They just don't make logical sense because, legally, there really is no reason to believe that it would go down that way (i.e. written in statutes), regardless of animosity Whites, even White legislators, etc. may hold.

In even greater opposition to that emotional perspective, I refer to one of my favorite commentaries that highlight what has happened in American History with respect to the White public adjusting to new ideas/regimes:

quote:
White Perceptions [An Interview with Tim Wise]

Q: To what extent do you consider it important to frame a movement against racism in a way that affects whites' perceptions of blacks (or other races) in a positive way?

A:
Not very. At least not as the means to an ends...precisely because progress on racism has never been related to how whites felt about black people. Rather, progress has come via movement activity forcing elites to make changes, whether or not the mass of whites supported such changes. None of the civil rights acts of the 1960's were supported by the majority of whites. Neither was desegregation via the Brown v Board decision. And needless to say, neither was abolition of slavery. But interestingly, after laws were changed, more and more people (though admittedly not enough) came to accede to the new norm, and actually reduced their opposition to such laws and changes. Keep in mind, most people are conformist. They assume the laws are legitimate, and the state is legitimate. As a result, when activists force changes, over time (sometimes a very short time), most people come to at least passively accept those changes, and many even come to support them outright.
Whether you totally agree or not, it makes for a pretty compelling case.
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