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Reply to "New Black Conservative Website"

quote:
Originally posted by Kweli4Real:
NTA, that's a great philosophical discussion to answer the philosophy of globalism vis a vis zero sum game. And, I'm sure Free Market Globalists such as Toussaint would prefer that we focus on that level of discussion-the theoretic.

Because focusing on the real impact of FMG means looking in the face of real live losers in this game, real live human beings that no longer have a job. And while if the factory locates from one intra-country region to another, people can follow the jobs, this does not address the race to the bottom in terms of wages and/or benefits.

But not only don't they have a means to support themselves, FMG has always negated the position [or avoided the topic] of a social safety.

Again,
quote:
All philosophies that discount real human's suffering as a cost of progress sound great ... until one wakes up are realizes that you are not the player that you thought you were; rather you are merely one of the played.


The thing is that my position is not a philosophical one; it's simply an application of the physical laws of nature concerning matter and energy. Economics is subject to these laws because matter and energy is what makes economies work.

I am a firm believer, based upon physical laws of nature, that there can never be a net gain...only shifts. You might have 20 dollars in one pocket and nothing in the other. If you move 20 dollars to the other pocket, you still only have 20 dollars, but one pocket experienced a gain and the other a loss.

Profit is simply the act of getting more out of something than what you put into it. The only way one can get more out of something that that which they contributed is for someone else to get less out than that which they contributed. Wealth and poverty is thus created from unequal exchanges and or ownership of matter and energy. The concept of value distorts the physical laws, because people in need or in desire are often willing to enter into unequal exchanges.

Take for example that I am driving down a highway in the desert and come upon a man walking in the desert that is dehydrated and needs water to survive. Say that I have some water in may car that I paid $1 for. I then take advantage of the man's need and offer to sell him the water for $100 dollars. Of course, he values the water so much at this point that he would likely pay $1000 for it, but I cut him a deal for only $100. We both go away satisfied. The man got the water he wanted and needed and I made a $99 profit from the sale of water. The fact that both parties are content masks the unequal exchange. It took me only a minute and a half of work (energy expenditure), to purchase the water. Assuming that the person in the desert earned the same rate of pay for his work, it cost him slightly more than 2 hours of expended energy, conserved in currency, to buy the water from me. Thus I transferred his energy, represented in currency, to me, meaning that I profited by getting more energy back, than the energy I put in. This is how the system of capitalism works but on a much larger scale. Energy (in the form of human work and natural resources) are pooled together then reallocated back disproportionately in favor of the owners of capital.
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