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Reply to "Negroes who defend the status quo once they've "gotten theirs""

I'm curious, kevin41: what do you think of Afrimericans who were born in poverty yet mainatined their extreme conservative bias throughout the tough years? This isn't a question on whether or not you agree with their views. Despite what some people may believe not all superconservative Blacks did a 180 once they reached a certain level of prominence--some were ultra right-wing through it all and used that conservative ethos to get where they are.

As for the health care issue, it never ceases to amaze me that the USA is the only First World Industrial nation on this planet that doesn't have some form of socialised medicine. The lack of health care certain segments of our society must endure--or the shitty health care they receive (baring illegals and those who can afford to pay but don't want to) is appaling. Having been in that category once, I can personally atest to it.

Constructive Feedback, it seems that you tried to make the point that some aspects of our lives places us in a higher risks category than other races--if that wasn't your point, then my apologies. If it was, I agree to a certain extent, but study after study has also shown that when all factors are controlled for, Blacks consistently get worse care than our counterparts. We are less likely to be given potentially life saving drugs, less likely to underg potentially life-saving surgeries/treatments, less likely to receive adequate aftercare following an operation...hell, we're even less likely to receive heavy painkillers for extreme pain! Remember, this is still the case even when controlling for isurance and ability to pay.

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0DXK/is_18_20/ai_110619175#continue
quote:
African Americans and Hispanics are more likely to experience pain, but less likely to be treated for it, even when they are in a doctor's care. Black folks in nursing homes are 64 percent more likely to do without pain medication than their White counterparts. Hispanics with broken arms or legs were twice as likely as Whites to go without pain medication. Part of the problem is that health care professionals see some patients through a stereotypical lens that colors (pardon the pun) their diagnosis and treatment.

Even when researchers controlled for income, language skills and insurance status, African Americans and other racial and ethnic minorities were under treated for pain across a range of conditions, from cancer and chest pain to post-surgical and lower back pain. Additionally, access to pain care and pain medication varied by race, with pharmacies in the 'hood far less likely to carry narcotic pain medicines.
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