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Reply to "Mulatto Couple Produces Blonde, Blue Eyed White Child"

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Why is that so surprising? You know how biologically diverse most African-Americans are, and probably British Blacks/Africans too (to a lesser extent).


It's not surprising so much as interesting. Part of the reason I posted this was to show the limitations of our modern concept of "race". Also, I've always wondered how such people chose to define themselves within our current construct of race when they have features that are drastically different from what society dictates their race should display. It reminded me of an earlier thread on passing, and I was curious as to a when mixed race person stops being "Black" and starts being "another race". Also, you say it's all Black, but how does one define Blackness and whiteness? No doubt society will view the darker twin as "Black" or perhaps "mixed race" in the UK, but what about her sister? They are full siblings, so does this mean racial designation is a primary function of appearance, or genes, and on and on.I think this situation is a good talking point for that.

At any rate, I suppose my main reason was because I've always been fascinated by the diversity between and within human populations. As for the term mullato, what would you suggest instead? Black? Negro? I suppose "mixed race" or "multiethnic" could suffice, but it was my understanding that "mulatto" was a term meant to signify specifically an equal admixture of white and Black. Am I missing something?

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The concept of "race" is a Eurocentric, 18th century invention. Technically, there is only one race: Humans. Different "races" like Blacks and Whites are Varities, not "Races".

And yet we still have africanamerica.org, geared towards a Black American population to discus things of relevance to their race. Biologically speaking, there is no true threshold between a "variety", "race" and "subspecies"; however, modern biology and anthropology affords humans the dignity of "race". I agree that much of our ideas about race do stem from a Eurocentric time period, but how can we dismiss these categorization and embrace them at the same time? off My whole college career I've heard the mantra "race is a social construct". While this is true to up to a point, it totally disregards the fact that to a certain extent "race" is biologial fact, in that seperate human populations are genetically distinct.

Part of the reason I posted this was to show how insufficent the categories can sometimes be. If you guys really don't like this post, I can remove it.
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