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How African Americans Have Become A Permanent Minority In South Carolina

 

(Actually these tactics have been consistently used since the 70's, in EVERY STATE, but especially in any areas with large Black and/or minority populations, but also in parts of the country that don't have large Black/and/or minority populations merely to keep those minorities disenfranchised from and/or powerless in America's political processes and outcomes.)  i.e., It's not ONLY South Carolina.)  (See "Gerrymandering")

 

 

 

Need to Know, January 20, 2012: Voting, power and South Carolina

Jeff Greenfield

Nearly half a century after the passage of the federal Voting Rights Act, African-Americans throughout the deep south still find themselves with little real power. In a report from South Carolina on the eve of the GOP primary there, anchor Jeff Greenfield describes how the sharp rise in the number of black state lawmakers creates the mistaken impression of greater black power. Greenfield also interviews two of the state’s leading political analysts about the GOP presidential primary.

 

And: This week’s American Voices essay features Bernard Lafayette, a prominent 1960s civil rights leader who discusses what he believes are organized efforts to undo black voting rights today.

 

 

Watch the individual segments:

Party down: Voting and power in South Carolina

In a report from South Carolina on the eve of the GOP primary there, anchor Jeff Greenfield describes how the sharp rise in the number of black state lawmakers creates the mistaken impression of greater black power.

Interview: Brad Warthen and Robert Oldendick

Host Jeff Greenfield speaks with two of the state’s leading political analysts about the GOP presidential primary.

American Voices: Bernard Lafayette

Need to Know’s “American Voices” essay features Bernard Lafayette, a prominent civil rights leader from the 1960s who reflects on the struggle for black voting rights then and what he believes are organized efforts to undo them now.

Watch more full episodes of Need to Know.

 

 . . . 

 

Party down: Voting and power in South Carolina

By 

The crucial South Carolina primary is set to take place on Saturday. So far, Newt Gingrich’s marital history and Mitt Romney’s career as a corporate buyout specialist have dominated the rhetoric of the campaign. But no honest conversation about South Carolina can avoid the topic of race — not in a state where the Civil War began. A state that was home to some of the most powerful opponents of civil rights, and where the Confederate flag still flies in front of the state capitol.

You can look at the dozens of African-Americans who hold seats in the state legislature and see changes that were almost unimaginable half a century ago. But when you ask, “Where does power really lie?” the answer isn’t so black and white … or maybe it is.

Watch the rest of the segments from this episode.



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"I'm just trying to make a way out of no way, for my people" -Modejeska Monteith Simpkins

 

AFRICAN AMERICA IS AT WAR

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON AFRICAN AMERICA

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON AFRICAN AMERICANS

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON BLACK PEOPLE IN AMERICA

AMERICA'S RACISTS HAVE INFILTRATED AMERICAN POLICE FORCES TO WAGE A RACE WAR AGAINST BLACK PEOPLE IN AMERICA

THE BLACK RACE IS AT WAR

FIRST WORLD WAR:  THE APPROXIMATELY 6,000 YEAR WORLD WAR ON AFRICA AND THE BLACK RACE

Last edited by sunnubian
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