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Reply to "British Black Panthers"

It is a fact that in the nineteen sixties and seventies the Black Panther Party faced many limitations within the black community at-large.  Black social organizations in the decades of the sixties and seventies, e.g., CORE (Congress of Racial Equality), SCLC, (Southern Christian Leadership Council), SNICC (Student Nonviolence Coordinating Committee) and The Nation of Islam, although all of them had the same goals as it related to racial justice and social change, - each operated independent of the other.  Aside from Malcolm X who was assassinated in 1965, only the Black Panther Party advocated social change through violence.  This isolated the Black Panther Party from other black organizations of the decade.  Although Dr King did correspond with Malcolm X and other leaders of the decade, e.g., Stokely Carmichael, Roy Innis et el, the SCLC did not want the Black Panther Party in the south advocating violence or Malcolm X radicalizing southern black youth, - all of which would have drastically interfered with Dr. King’s non-violent movement and approach to social change. 

 

For this reason as well as other factors, J. Edgar Hoover and the F.B.I consequently were able to gradually minimize the effectiveness of these social and political movements and ultimately destroy them.  Other factors that contributed to weakening these sixties and seventies black organizations involve regionalism.  Even though for example, Elijah Muhammad was born and raised in Georgia, The Nation of Islam in the decade of the sixties was nearly invisible in the south.  The same was true of Malcolm X.  Aside from his 1965 trip to Selma, Alabama, where Malcolm X spoke at Brown's Chapel AME Church and a previous speaking engagement at Brown University - no other history exist of Malcolm spreading his Muslim or radical social change ideology at any of the HBCU’s that existed in the sixties.  Nor did he speak at any southern white university as he had at white universities in the northeast and Europe, e.g., Columbia and Oxford Universities.  Today, although far less effective as social change agents than they were in their heyday, the SCLC, Nation of Islam and the black church at-large remain as the only lasting social and political change agents African Americans have been able to maintain.

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