Skip to main content

Reply to "Black Women vs. White women:SHOSHANNA JOHNSON VS. JESSICA LYNCH!"

AFRO BELLES

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

White Women: The Silent Racist

All too often when people think of racist they envision the white male. The confederate flag-totting red neck, the red-faced arrogant supervisor, or the corporate god sitting on the golden throne of a large company, but never does the image of the white woman fit the profile of a racist. Why? because most people view the white woman as an advocate against racism and the calming force of her white male counterpart on racial issues.

For some reason white women have been given an unspoken clearance from being racist because people believe that most are against it and may have been a large reason why slavery and more modern forms of racial oppression have subsided. People assume that the sensitivity of white women eased the brutalities of white men thus making the white male more passive toward Blacks and other minorities.

This reasoning is logical enough because white women possess a type of innocence in their demeanor that would suggest such sensitivity and empathy, however, not many people consider the fact that white women also contributed many times to the oppression and brutality of other minorities, also in so many unspoken words. They are, in fact, and always have been, the motivation behind the white male.

To look at the white woman who sits across from you at work and picture her chanting racial slurs at the local Klan meeting may seem far-fetched to many but this image is not unrealistic at all. Since the growth of the Internet, which allows more people to collaborate together from many parts of the country and world, hate groups have risen quite fast. And more [white] women are joining these groups.

"The number of women in some groups now ranges 25 to 50 percent of the membership," according to Kathleen Blee who authored the book: Inside Organized Racism: Women in the Hate Movement.

However, "Blee found that women tend to join not because they subscribe to racist or anti-Semitic ideology, as men do, but for personal reasons. They will befriend a member of such a group, often without knowing it, and slowly begin to subscribe to the group's beliefs in a cult-like fashion, she said."

"White supremacist groups are increasingly recruiting women because they tend to be overlooked by police and are less likely to leave the groups than are men, according to research by a University of Pittsburgh sociologist."

Should minorities be concerned about such a rise in racist white women? No, because the hate group will never actually gain too much power to fear nationally, but minorities should be concerned with hidden racist attitudes held by the white women we see everyday. Many secretly hold the belief that they should have first rights to positions of high authority and decision-making in the work force over those of minorities.

"Like their male counterparts, extremist women deny that Blacks, Jews and other minorities are equal to whites. Yet many extremist women argue that they themselves should be given the same consideration as white men in the workplace. By joining the workforce, these women believe they can better aid the white supremacist movement."

People, especially Black people, believe that the days of the "conspiracy" is over, but this belief should not be counted out so fast. There is always potential for a rise in certain beliefs based on many social factors of society. For instance, some group could feel that there are too many illegal aliens in the country and begin to target them for the welfare system. Because of a rise of one variable, a reaction of another is sparked naturally. Thus, since the rise in minorities in the work force, white women must somehow protect their jobs and futures.

According to and article at the Her Race Web site, Jane Burton presents appropriate "Careers for White Women," such as "Lawyer," "Human Resources Worker," "Advertising Writer," and "Real Estate Agent." Telling women "the White race needs" their help, Burton writes, "You need to work; so work in the right direction!" She asks, "What well-paying, interesting jobs could you choose that would most advance your race?"

Think that white women are only interested in protecting their financial futures? Think again. Many are prepared to protect their children and family if violence is involved. This is another image people tend to overlook. What if it really came to a race war is there any reason to believe that all white women would be standing in between the opposing forces crying "peace, love, and not war?" Not likely.

"Many other racist women suggest that females should be equal partners in the extremists' struggle, even when that struggle involves violent action. Nancy Jensen believes that women who would choose to lead the "movement" on the battlefield should be given the opportunity to do so. "As for the issue of women physically defending their race or country," she writes, "if they possess that desire and ability, than [sic] they should go for it."

Even in the political arena, more white women are pushing for higher positions that would allow them to secure laws and policies beneficial to their own interest. Not all white women are for "saving the children and the homeless," but more are concerned about their children's future and protecting it from extinction because of too many minority workers and workforce diversity.

"Other concepts promote female extremist political activism. "Diana, Love of a Princess" by Lisa Turner recognizes "the unique power a woman can have in the political world." Writing without any apparent sense of irony, Turner states that the white supremacist "movement" "desperately needs more women" because "women can represent nurturing, love, reaching out, touching, bridging a gap, and bringing a gentle, diplomatic approach to the problems at hand."

Never think that these are hate group concepts alone. Both conservative and liberal high social class elitist have the same ideas, they just do not promote them as openly. There are hundreds of elitist social clubs - not considered as "groups " - that are comprised of rich whites and the women who nurture this club's motivation have lots of social power.

In fact, it can be safely assumed that most racist are not confederate flag-totting red necks, red-faced arrogant supervisors, or the corporate gods, but are made up of democrats, republicans, and judges in positions of high authority throughout the country. As more women move into political and social positions of authority, be aware that not all of them believe minorities are their equivalent.

Source from: http://www.adl.org/ - http://www.religionnewsblog.com/

© 2003 by CR Hamilton


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------




http://www.afromerica.com/knowledge/justice/hatecrimes/whtwomen.php
×
×
×
×