Finally....the world gets it..."A Single Toilet Can Mean Safety And Dignity For Girls

A Single Toilet Can Mean Safety And Dignity For Girls

Girls who relieve themselves outdoors are often subjected to attacks and other awful risks.

03/22/2016 05:49 pm ET

About a third of the world doesn’t have access to a toilet, and it’s the girls and women in this underserved group who disproportionately suffer as a result.

Women and girls who have no choice but to relieve themselves outdoors in the open are at a higher risk of getting attacked, for example. And girls who don’t have access to sanitation at school often miss class when they menstruate. 

To highlight the power a toilet has to empower and protect people, and the need to bring sanitation to those in need, UNICEF released an arresting photo series of people around the world and their toilets, on Tuesday’s World Toilet Day. The subjects each shared how gaining access to sanitation has brought them improved health, security and a greater sense of dignity.

  • India
    UNICEF/UNI147517/Romana
    Tulsi Prajapati shows the toilet in her house in Madhya Pradesh, India. About 50 million in Madhya Pradesh defecate in the open and half of children under 3 suffer from stunting, according to UNICEF.
  • Nepal
    UNICEF/UNI199221/Karki
    A student washes his hands outside a toilet in a UNICEF-supported temporary learning center in Dolakha, one of the districts affected by the earthquake last year in Nepal. More than 90 percent of the district’s school buildings were damaged. 
  • Madagascar
    UNICEF/UNI180146/Matas
    Girls wait in line to use latrines at the Lohanosy Primary School in Madagascar. A lack of separate toilets often leads girls to miss school, according to UNICEF. The organization supported the construction of the water and sanitation facilities, classrooms and a sports field.
  • Niger
    UNICEF/UN07414/Tremeau
    “My children use the potty and then I empty it in the latrine. When they will be 5, they can start using the latrines,” says Djamila Mamane, 25, who has two children. “Me, I have been using the latrines for 4 years. There is a real difference of how life was then and nowadays. When you go to the toilets in the bush you can run into other people, this is really shameful.”
  • Eritrea
    UNICEF/UNI178403/Pirozzi
    A girl carrying soap and a small pitcher approaches her family’s latrine in the village of Echet Tsaeda in Eritrea, a country in East Africa. Three villages in Fana, with support from UNICEF, were declared ‘open defecation free’ in 2012. That means all of their residents committed to building and using latrines and had renounced open-air defecation. That, in turn, protects their water supply and environment from contamination by human excrement.
  • Bolivia
    UNICEF/UNI189326/Gilbertson
    Aidi Panoso toilet trains 3-year-old Mateo Visalla, one of her twin sons, at home in Totorenda, a Guaraní community in Bolivia. Before the family got a toilet and running water, they would relieve themselves in the bushes where there was a risk of getting bitten by snakes
Original Post

It might do wonders for safety and dignity, but not a whole lot for cleanliness and the offset of disease. Nothing like sharing a toilet facility with thousands of people in a dirt infested enclosure. Spiders, filth, enclosed, no Comet/no Chlorox/no Soap/no running CLEAN water. No words for this. Thank God, personally, I've never had to deal with a situation such as this. I'd forever be running around with my pants down screaming like a bitch over something or another crawling; if I even had pants. No bathtubs, no showers, no whole lots of things. Most of America's great for something, at last!!!!! 

Norland posted:

It might do wonders for safety and dignity, but not a whole lot for cleanliness and the offset of disease. Nothing like sharing a toilet facility with thousands of people in a dirt infested enclosure. Spiders, filth, enclosed, no Comet/no Chlorox/no Soap/no running CLEAN water. No words for this. Thank God, personally, I've never had to deal with a situation such as this. I'd forever be running around with my pants down screaming like a bitch over something or another crawling; if I even had pants. No bathtubs, no showers, no whole lots of things. Most of America's great for something, at last!!!!! 

Hell, it can't be any different that using a lot of public toilets in America where God only knows what the hell some nasty, disgusting person has did in there.

I have seen public toilets that reek of urine, even though they "look" clean; I've seen where someone has actually taken the time to smear feces on the wall inside a stall; I've seen where some disgusting freak has literally sh1tted ON the toilet seat; I've seen urine on the toilet seat, urine on the floor, vomit on the floor, sanitary napkin dispensers over flowing  . . . 

 

Sista Norland wrote:  It might do wonders for safety and dignity, but not a whole lot for cleanliness and the offset of disease. Nothing like sharing a toilet facility with thousands of people in a dirt infested enclosure. Spiders, filth, enclosed, no Comet/no Chlorox/no Soap/no running CLEAN water. No words for this. Thank God, personally, I've never had to deal with a situation such as this. I'd forever be running around with my pants down screaming like a bitch over something or another crawling; if I even had pants. No bathtubs, no showers, no whole lots of things. Most of America's great for something, at last!!!!! 

  I look at it more on the safety side for women who have to go to bathroom in the fields while monster predators are lurking behind a bush waiting to strike as soon as the women lift the long dresses.  For India...this is a HUGE improvement and should reduce the rape of women in that country.  But if you notice....in one of the photos in Africa,  the young girl is carrying a bar of soap and pitcher of water with her.  Despite what massa tries to say...African women are CLEAN...but they have to have the products to be clean and villages can't do that when  you're abrutly targeted and have to run from monsters like Boko or others as you attempt to use the bathroom.  

And the ONLY reason why America's hygiene is better is because of two groups of people:  Africans and Amerindian.  Massa and his whore came from filth.  They used to throw their fluids including you know what out the window in Europe.  As why THEY brought all those water-borne diseases to the Americas.  So I am elated that the world is realizing that the ability to go to the restroom is a PRIORITY and a leverage to keep women and children safe clean and disease-free.   Side note:  Not trying to stereotype India...but!  In this country some Indians bring their upbringing with them and lot of them are not familiar with personal hygiene.  [they hide behind so call tradition...like not shaving[which we know holds odor....and not understanding the use of toilet paper.]   And because of some of their ancient traditions, India has been overwhelmed with hepatitis C and B.  Like for example, bathing in the Ganges River which is a dumping ground for dead bodies, toxic chemicals etc.  However, in the ancient tribal places in both the Americas and Africa...you will ALWAYS find two things: a toilet-form and an area to bathe.  Hell they even got a place where women give birth.  And you never heard of either group giving massa ANYTHING.   That's letting you know that we as a people were always aware of being clean and disease free-and the importance of running water.  Cuz why?  We were NEVER to ONES to infect anybody.  Massa was.  Cuz when he got here?  Those places were already here until he destroyed them.  But!  

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